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Snapchat video ads may get three second delay to stop rapid skips

Snapchat video ads may get three second delay to stop rapid skips

Snapchat is considering a new monetization method that will upset users should it go live: three-second wait times before skipping advertisements. According to sources speaking on the matter, Snapchat is "serious" in its contemplation of the change, which would come close to mirroring the skip-button used on YouTube video advertisements. The reason, according to the sources, is young users' tendency to immediately skip ads.

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YouTube loses major advertisers over controversial videos

YouTube loses major advertisers over controversial videos

YouTube has lost major advertisers as the controversy over inappropriate videos targeting and featuring minors on its site grows. At the heart of the matter are a glut of videos hosted on YouTube that feature predatory comments directed at children, as well as inappropriate videos that target and/or feature minors. YouTube has taken steps to address the problems amid the controversy, but it hasn't been enough to stop some brands from pulling their ads.

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Honest Ads Act wants tech companies to reveal who buys political ads

Honest Ads Act wants tech companies to reveal who buys political ads

Russian-linked online advertisements have snowballed into a new bill called the Honest Ads Act that would force tech companies like Google and Facebook to disclose when political advertisements are bought on their platforms. This disclosure bill was drafted by Democrats Amy Klobuchar and Mark Warner; soon after Republican Sen. John McCain signed onto it. The bill aims to increase transparency about who is funding online political advertisements and, potentially, revealing what kind of motives may lie behind them.

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Facebook will give Congress the ads bought by Russian agency

Facebook will give Congress the ads bought by Russian agency

Facebook has revealed that it will provide Congress with the advertisements that were purchase by the Russian entity Internet Research Agency throughout 2015 to 2017. The advertisements came to light a couple weeks ago when Facebook revealed that the Russian agency had bought in excess of 3,000 ads targeting both political and social issues in the United States.

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Facebook blocks ads from fake news Pages

Facebook blocks ads from fake news Pages

Facebook is blocking advertisements from Pages that dish out fake news, taking away the financial incentives that drive some to create these faux news bits. This is the company's latest effort to rid its service of fake news, whether it's the variety designed to manipulate public opinion or simply garbage that individuals use to rake in ad revenue. The ad-blocking action will only apply against a Page that repeatedly shares such stories, however.

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These are the 3 new Google ads you’ll soon be seeing everywhere

These are the 3 new Google ads you’ll soon be seeing everywhere

Google has introduced AdSense Native ads, a new type of advertisement that, says the company, it has designed to match how your website looks and feels. The Native ads will be comprised, at least for now, of three new ad types: In-feed, In-article, and Matched content, the latter of which has already been available to certain publishers. The advertisements are designed for different aspects of your website, and you can expect to start seeing them all over the place.

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Chrome will have a built-in ad-blocker starting in early 2018

Chrome will have a built-in ad-blocker starting in early 2018

Back in April, we reported on sources that claimed Google was going to bake an ad-blocker directly into its Chrome browser, something that would block advertisements deemed to be intrusive and/or disruptive for visitors. Google has confirmed that report today, shedding light on a crucial detail that was missing the first time around: Chrome will block all advertisements on a website that doesn't adhere to Better Ads Standards.

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Chrome with built-in ad-blocker may target the most obnoxious ads

Chrome with built-in ad-blocker may target the most obnoxious ads

Google is planning to add a built-in ad-blocker to Chrome, according to sources, and it will target the Internet's most obnoxious types of advertisements. These sub-standard advertisements include things like videos that automatically start playing and advertisements that won't disappear until a long countdown timer is finished. The sources indicate that Google hasn't ironed out all of the details yet, and that it may not ultimately go through with the feature.

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Facebook’s racial exclusion ad feature prompts concerns

Facebook’s racial exclusion ad feature prompts concerns

Late last week, a report surfaced revealing that Facebook enables advertisers to exclude certain people based on race. With this feature, advertisers can make sure their advertisements are only seen by certain people — only whites, for example — while excluding others including Asians, Hispanics, and African Americans. The feature is available for advertisements that can't legally make those exclusions.

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Watchdogs want Google, Disney to stop kid-centric influencer marketing

Watchdogs want Google, Disney to stop kid-centric influencer marketing

Influencer marketing has been an increasingly contentious issue, with the FTC recently calling out deceptive sponsored social media posts as the first part of a crackdown against them. The commission wants to see more transparency with those posts, but is noticeably quiet on a related issue: influencer marketing targeted specifically at children. As a result, three consumer watchdogs have filed a complaint with the FTC, requesting that it do something about the problem.

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Here’s what happen to your unused mobile data quota according to this video

Here’s what happen to your unused mobile data quota according to this video

In the US and in most other countries when you pay for data each month, you lose what you don’t use with most carriers. This is a major source of annoyance for just about everyone who has a mobile phone with a data plan. If you pay for something and don’t use it all, you should get to keep that data. AT&T and other carriers in the US do allow you to roll over unused data.

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FTC sets its sights on sneaky sponsored social media posts

FTC sets its sights on sneaky sponsored social media posts

While some types of sponsored content are easy to spot, that kind of transparency hasn't quite made its way into the social media realm. Tweets, status updates, Instagram photos and more dot the digital landscape with celebrities holding or using products, slyly showcasing notable brands to their thousands or millions of followers. Often times, these posts are advertisements the individual is getting paid to publish...but rarely are the statuses flagged as such.

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