Science

NASA Earth time lapse shows 20 years of seasonal changes in 2.5 minutes

NASA Earth time lapse shows 20 years of seasonal changes in 2.5 minutes

A new NASA time lapse shows 20 years of seasonal landscape changes around the globe, condensing the years down to a mere 2.5 minutes. Though NASA is known primarily for its space missions, the agency focuses extensively on Earth science, too, training a variety of satellites down toward our own planet. The content presented in this new video was gathered by NASA satellites every year since 1997.

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Ominous NASA climate change app shows which cities will flood

Ominous NASA climate change app shows which cities will flood

Coastal cities around the world are at risk of severe flooding and even eventual eradication as ocean levels rise. A new simulation from NASA highlights how big this potential problem is, showing what could happen to 293 coastal cities around the world over the next 100 years. Among the observed changes are severe flooding to big locations like New York City and London.

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Scientists use gene editing for the first time in attempt to cure metabolic disease

Scientists use gene editing for the first time in attempt to cure metabolic disease

A team of scientists has for the first time tried to cure a disease by editing the genes inside the person's body. The first use of this procedure happened this week in California on a man called Brian Madeux. In the procedure, Madeux was connected to an IV and through that, he was given billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a very precise spot.

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Temperate Earth-mass exoplanet discovered 11 light-years away

Temperate Earth-mass exoplanet discovered 11 light-years away

Scientists and space agencies all around the world are scouring the heavens in a search for planets that could potentially harbor life. A new discovery has been made that was found using the ESO's planet-hunting HARPS instrument. The exoplanet has been dubbed Ross 128 b and is the second closest temperate planet detected with Proxima b being the closest.

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Brain implants could boost memory by 30% says scientists

Brain implants could boost memory by 30% says scientists

Scientists have devised a new brain implant that might one day be used to treat conditions that affect a person's memory, such as dementia. The implants that the researchers have devised could boost memory function by as much as 30%. Researchers from the University of Southern California have developed what they call a memory prosthesis.

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Ancient wine jar shows winemaking goes back 8,000 years in Armenia

Ancient wine jar shows winemaking goes back 8,000 years in Armenia

Anthropologist Patrick McGovern from the University of Pennsylvania has been searching for the origins of wine for years and his investigation took him into the mountainous areas of modern Georgia, Armenia and Iran near the Black Sea. These areas are where the ancestors of modern-day wine grapes originally grew wild. Ancient writings from these areas point to wine being integral in that region and an established part of the culture thousands of years ago.

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Letter to humanity from 15,000 scientists raise climate change alarm

Letter to humanity from 15,000 scientists raise climate change alarm

In 1992, a "warning" sent by the Union of Concerned Scientists and signed by 1,700 such people painted a dire picture of what could happen if the ozone layer problem wasn't dealt with. 25 years later, the ozone situation has improved but the planet, and humanity, is in an even worse condition. That is practically the message sent by the new "letter to humanity", signed by around 15,364 scientists from 184 countries, is trying to say, raising the alarms to the highest levels and potentially ruffling feathers along the way.

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Dream Chaser spacecraft conducts first successful atmospheric glide test

Dream Chaser spacecraft conducts first successful atmospheric glide test

Sierra Nevada Corp. has announced that it has concluded its first successful atmospheric glide test. The Dream Chaser spacecraft landed at Edwards Air Force Base in California on Saturday. The successful glide test was able to verify the spacecraft handling qualities and guidance systems before the spacecraft can move on to the next round of testing.

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Daimler’s newest fuel cells aren’t going anywhere

Daimler’s newest fuel cells aren’t going anywhere

Put in hydrogen; get out nothing but electricity and water. There's a reason hydrogen fuel cells have become increasingly popular among automakers, but Daimler's latest ambition for the technology isn't actually designed to move at all. Instead, it's all about weening power-hogs off the grid.

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Dinosaurs could have survived if asteroid had hit another location on Earth

Dinosaurs could have survived if asteroid had hit another location on Earth

The odds were stacked against the dinosaurs when the massive asteroid thought to be about 6-miles-wide slammed into the Earth 66 million years ago. The impact released energy more powerful than billions of atomic bombs and the aftermath killed off 75% of all life on Earth. The event is known as the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction.

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Clinical trial using blood-plasma transfusions shows promise for Alzheimer’s disease

Clinical trial using blood-plasma transfusions shows promise for Alzheimer’s disease

Massive amounts of money and effort are being put into researching treatments and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer's disease. A clinical trial has been running that is using human blood-plasma transfusions to treat the disease has found that the treatments are safe and promising for those suffering from the disease. Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have reported success with this treatment in an early-phase clinical trial.

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Science piracy site Sci-Hub ordered to shut down again, but it won’t listen

Science piracy site Sci-Hub ordered to shut down again, but it won’t listen

Entertainment piracy may get the most attention, but it's far from the only type of unauthorized online sharing. Another major variety is educational piracy, both in the form of over-priced college textbooks and in the unauthorized sharing of scientific papers that would otherwise be hidden behind a paywall. A court has just ordered one of those sites, Sci-Hub, to close down.

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