Science

Ancient human ‘ghost’ species revealed by saliva protein

Ancient human ‘ghost’ species revealed by saliva protein

A simple salivary protein has revealed a so-called 'ghost' species of ancient humans, a new study reveals, hinting at the existence of an archaic species that swapped genetic material with human ancestors. It is well known that ancient hominin species contributed to the rise of modern humans, not the least of which is the Neanderthals and lesser known Denisovans. Such rendezvous took place in Europe and Asia, but it seems similar encounters may have happened in ancient Africa, too.

Continue Reading

Phobos makes surprise appearance in Hubble Mars photo

Phobos makes surprise appearance in Hubble Mars photo

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope recently captured a time lapse of Phobos, a tiny rock-like moon, orbiting around Mars. The resulting composite image of the 13 total exposures shows what appears to be a bright dot of light near Mars...it looks something like a spec of dust that reflected light back at a camera. That 'speck of dust,' though, is a great look at one of the Red Planet's two small moons.

Continue Reading

Street View in Space: Google Maps on the International Space Station

Street View in Space: Google Maps on the International Space Station

Google Street View has escaped Earth and made it to the International Space Station, with the first-person Google Maps add-on venturing out into zero gravity. European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet spent half a year on the ISS, returning to Earth last month. While on the orbiting research platform he captured numerous Street View images which Google has now released publicly.

Continue Reading

SpaceX’s next-gen Dragon won’t have propulsion landings after all

SpaceX’s next-gen Dragon won’t have propulsion landings after all

SpaceX has abandoned plans to use powered landings for its Mars-destined Dragon spacecraft, company CEO Elon Musk recently revealed. The original plan involved utilizing thrusters to help the Dragon land, but a 'tough decision' was made to eliminate that ability, or at least part of it. Musk explains that while the technical ability is still there, it has removed from the design the small legs that would pop out for the spacecraft to land on.

Continue Reading

T-Rex was a power-walker not a sprinter, AI study concludes

T-Rex was a power-walker not a sprinter, AI study concludes

The Tyrannosaurus-Rex was, no doubt, one of the largest beasts to ever walk around on two legs. Questions remain, though, about how quickly it could move; were those legs similarly capable of running, and if so, how fast could this dinosaur move? The topic has been studied extensively, but answers are still forthcoming. In the latest study, researchers used a multi-physics approach to reconstructing the dino's locomotor abilities, and the results are surprising.

Continue Reading

Plastic is clogging Earth and recycling is barely helping

Plastic is clogging Earth and recycling is barely helping

Despite the push to "go green," plastic waste is growing in quantity at an alarming rate, and current recycling efforts simply aren't keeping up. That's the ominous conclusion from a breakthrough study exploring the use - and re-use or disposal - of plastic materials since the 1950s, and published today. In fact, as of 2015, a mere 9-percent of waste plastic had been recycled, the researchers discovered.

Continue Reading

Photoshopped fakes trick you all the time, researchers report

Photoshopped fakes trick you all the time, researchers report

Photo manipulation tricks human eyes very easily according to a new report. Three researchers from the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick have done a number of tests to conclude that "people have poor ability to identify whether a real-world image is original or has been manipulated." In other words - humans do not have any sort of innate sense for discerning reality from computer-edited photography, AKA Photoshopping.

Continue Reading

Ross 128 red dwarf’s signals send scientists’ hearts aflutter

Ross 128 red dwarf’s signals send scientists’ hearts aflutter

You might have an image of outer space as being this vast, empty, and silent vacuum, and, to some extent, you’d be correct. But with the right instruments, you’d discover how much of a noisy party space really is. Radio waves of all kinds travel the vastness of space, taking ages even when traveling at the speed of light. And some of them naturally reach earth, giving scientists data to devour. Last week, however, a red dwarf by the name of Ross 128 in the constellation of Virgo has been sending us some rather strange signals and scientists are only too excited to find out what exactly they are. And no, they don’t think they’re from aliens.

Continue Reading

Japan’s space robot will steal your heart from the ISS

Japan’s space robot will steal your heart from the ISS

Japan's space agency has an adorable ball-shaped camera that looks like something from Wall-E, and it is live on the International Space Station right now. The camera, which is called Int-Ball, comes from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and it qualifies as a camera drone of sorts. Despite its location in space, operators can control this camera drone from Earth.

Continue Reading

Cryogenic fish were reanimated with lasers (and it worked this time)

Cryogenic fish were reanimated with lasers (and it worked this time)

Scientists have successfully reanimated fish that were frozen as part of a cryopreservation project. Though the process was not perfect -- most of the fish died within the first hour of being reanimated -- there were statistically notable instances of survival that highlighted the potential of this new cryopreservation technique. How did the researchers pull it off? By using very small particles of gold and laser beams.

Continue Reading

Study: water bears will survive until the Sun itself burns out

Study: water bears will survive until the Sun itself burns out

It's no secret that tardigrades -- also known as water bears -- are nearly indestructible, but a new study from Harvard and Oxford University highlights just how durable the tiny critters are. According to the study, water bears will outlive everyone on Earth in the face of catastrophes and mass extinction events, and will in fact persist to live until the Sun itself dies.

Continue Reading

Blame coal mining for Appalachia’s salty rivers

Blame coal mining for Appalachia’s salty rivers

Forget sipping fresh mountain spring water -- Appalachia has a salty river problem and coal mining is to blame. The salt leaches into the streams and rivers from crushed rock and coal that gets deposited in valleys from mountaintop-removal mining. The leeching then causes consistently higher levels of salt in the water, damaging the ecosystems that lie downstream.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next