Science

NASA video simulates Huygens’ historic descent and landing on Titan

NASA video simulates Huygens’ historic descent and landing on Titan

NASA has released a video showing a simulation of the Huygens probe’s descent and landing on Saturn’s moon, Titan. This probe’s landing is notable as the most distant landing to ever take place on another celestial body, says the space agency, and is also the only time something like this has landed on a ‘body’ located in the outer solar system. The probe's landing happened back in 2005, though the video itself is new.

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SpaceX launches first rocket since explosion, deploying satellites & landing successfully

SpaceX launches first rocket since explosion, deploying satellites & landing successfully

A round of congratulations are in order for SpaceX, as the Elon Musk-led agency successfully returned to flight on Saturday with the launch of a rocket that delivered 10 satellites into orbit, followed by a first stage booster landing atop a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean. This was SpaceX's first launch in over four months, following the August launchpad explosion of their previous rocket in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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The world’s tightest knot is too small to see

The world’s tightest knot is too small to see

A group of researchers have achieved a new record, but you can’t see it with the naked eye. Scientists with the University of Manchester have formed the tightest knot to ever grace our blue marble, at least as far as humans are aware, and they did so using molecular strands. Though the final knot is only about 20 nanometers long, it could lead to the creation of new, more advanced materials.

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Researchers use salmonella to attack deadly brain cancer tumors

Researchers use salmonella to attack deadly brain cancer tumors

Researchers with Duke University have detailed a new project in which salmonella was successfully tapped to target cancerous brain tumors. According to the university, biomedical engineers set their sights on a solution for one of the deadliest forms of brain cancer, the glioblastoma. Patients have only a 10-percent chance of surviving five years following their diagnoses of this cancer, but a potential new treatment may double those numbers.

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Saturn’s moon looks like the Death Star in new NASA photo

Saturn’s moon looks like the Death Star in new NASA photo

Back in 1789, the Saturn moon Mimas was discovered by William Herschel, the man after whom the moon's Herschel Crater is named. This crater is massive and fairly round in shape, with rising walls around the edge and a large triangular peak in the middle...all of which are reminiscent of the Death Star, earning Mimas its nickname. NASA has just released a new photo showing off the moon and its giant crater with sharp, high-contrast clarity.

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3D graphene is lighter than steel but ten times stronger

3D graphene is lighter than steel but ten times stronger

Yes, that is almost an oxymoron but almost a material scientists’ dream come true. A material that has 10 times the strength of steel, one of the hardest man-made materials, and yet also just 5% of its density. But that is precisely what researchers at MIT might have just accomplished by taking graphene, believed to be the strongest materials in existence, and forming it into a structure that resembles a coral more than a bar of steel.

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Fast space radio bursts finally traced to nearby galaxy

Fast space radio bursts finally traced to nearby galaxy

There are many mysteries in both the known and the unknown universe, but one that has recently confounded astronomers is what is known as Fast Radio Bursts (FRB). First recorded in 2007, these short explosions of radio energy were so strong but so short that it was near impossible to determine where they came from. Finally it seems that our stars have aligned and researchers have discovered that these FRBs are actually coming from a dwarf galaxy just outside our Milky Way. And, no, they're not coming from aliens.

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Nissan debuts Seamless Autonomous Mobility system based on NASA tech

Nissan debuts Seamless Autonomous Mobility system based on NASA tech

Like many car companies, Nissan's focus at CES 2017 this year is autonomous driving technology. Nissan Chariman and CEO Carlos Ghosn took the stage at the trade show this evening to announce a new driverless system called Seamless Autonomous Mobility (SAM). SAM will be one component of Nissan's Intelligent Mobility system, but it will likely be the most noteworthy one as well.

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Humans have a new organ and it’s been there for ages

Humans have a new organ and it’s been there for ages

You’d think that, by now, scientists would have gotten every body part identified and classified. But as the eternal mystery of the appendix proves, there are still parts of our body we have failed to grasp. Take for example the news that we have a new organ. No, we didn’t grow one over the decades as part of evolution (though some would wish we indeed grew more hands or arms). No, we’ve had the mesentery for as long as we had intestines, but it’s only now that it’s being raised to the status of “organ” from “anonymous tissue structure”.

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SpaceX returns to space on Sunday as investigation closes

SpaceX returns to space on Sunday as investigation closes

What should have been a glorious end to SpaceX's 2016 ended up in a blaze when, on 1st September, its Falcon 9 exploded even before it could get off the ground, taking Facebook's first satellite down with it. Now four months later, SpaceX is closing the books on its joint investigation with government agencies and industry experts. Having traced down the cause of that failed attempt, SpaceX will once again try its luck on 8th January in an attempt to start the year right.

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Rare dinosaur egg embryo hints at 6-month incubation times

Rare dinosaur egg embryo hints at 6-month incubation times

The popular image of dinosaurs is that of giant lizards. After all, that's where their name came from. Science, however, paints us a different and more complicated story. They were warm-blooded, unlike reptiles and some were actually closer to birds than lizards, having feathers and wings. There were, however, nonavian dinosaurs that were indeed closer to crocodiles than chicken. And these, according to scientists, laid eggs that took 6 months or more to hatch, which, in a sad way, helped bring about their extinction.

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Researchers: bad ‘magic mushroom’ trips may still be beneficial

Researchers: bad ‘magic mushroom’ trips may still be beneficial

So-called magic mushrooms are the source of renewed scientific interest in psilocybin, particularly the beneficial effects the chemical may have on helping terminal cancer patients accept impending death, among other things. Researchers recently published the results of a large survey they conducted with magic mushroom consumers, one in which they specifically looked for details about bad trips and their lasting effects.

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