Data Security

Three Madison Square Garden hack lessons to shop safe on Black Friday

Three Madison Square Garden hack lessons to shop safe on Black Friday

Madison Square Garden has announced that it was the victim of a security breach that lasted nearly a year. As if that weren't bad enough, the breach affected five Madison Square Garden venues - four in New York City and one in Chicago. Considering how many people live in those cities and visit them each year, this has the potential to be a rather serious attack.

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If Yahoo won’t take security seriously, then it deserves to die

If Yahoo won’t take security seriously, then it deserves to die

Yahoo has been in the news quite a bit recently, and aside from the announcement of its sale to Verizon, that news has mostly been negative. That's because Yahoo recently revealed that it was the victim of a major security breach. Again. This time around, whoever beat Yahoo's security made off with the login credentials and personal details associated with 500 million accounts.

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Apple promises fix for iOS 10’s iTunes backup security flaw

Apple promises fix for iOS 10’s iTunes backup security flaw

Security forensics company Elcomsoft revealed last week that encrypted iOS backups created in iTunes have been made far less secure with the recent release of iOS 10. While an unintentional flaw, the new password protected backups offer an "alternative password verification mechanism" that allows them to fall victim to brute force hacks much more quickly and easily than with previous iOS versions. Fortunately Apple acknowledged the issue, and says a fix is on the way with "an upcoming security update."

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How the Yahoo mail hack affects you, and what to do

How the Yahoo mail hack affects you, and what to do

Today is was revealed that Yahoo experienced a breach of account names and passwords of epic proportions. Now we're running down the ways which users - any user of Yahoo products of all sorts, with Yahoo accounts - should move forward. This includes password changing. This includes the potential use of Yahoo's Account Key. It includes not having a heart attack about the situation while, at the same time, understanding that one's account breach could mean some very serious things.

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Yahoo prepares to confirm rumors of extensive data breach

Yahoo prepares to confirm rumors of extensive data breach

Back at the beginning of August, we heard claims of a massive Yahoo data breach, with a hacker named Peace saying he made off with credentials for 200 million accounts. At the time, Yahoo said it was investigating those claims to figure out if they were actually true, but since then, we haven't heard anything from the company about the supposed hack. That may all change quickly, as new reports are saying that Yahoo will soon confirm the data breach.

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Hacking group OurMine takes control of Variety website, spams readers with email

Hacking group OurMine takes control of Variety website, spams readers with email

The group of hackers going by the name OurMine managed to briefly take over the website for the entertainment new outlet Variety this weekend. If the name OurMine sounds familiar, it's because the same collective was responsible for hacking social media accounts belonging to high-profile tech CEOs recently, including Twitter's Jack Dorsey, Google's Sundar Pichai, and even Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook.

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Twitter hackers manage to reactivate banned accounts

Twitter hackers manage to reactivate banned accounts

Twitter has been known to ban accounts for several reasons, such as if they're connected to known hacking groups or extremist organizations, and sometimes if the use is offensive/abusive. Once an account has been suspended, there's really not supposed to be anyway to reverse the ban unless the social network itself decides to. That's why is comes as a surprise that hackers have not only gained control of a handful of said accounts, but actually managed to reactivate them as well.

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Hackers can steal data via the sounds of a hard drive

Hackers can steal data via the sounds of a hard drive

Just about anytime you think you and your computer are safe from hackers and security weaknesses, some bizarre, unexpected method or flaw gets discovered. Case in point: security researchers have come up with a way to steal data from a computer's hard drive just by listening to the sounds it makes. Not only can information be transmitted without a users' knowledge, but their computer doesn't even need to be connected to the internet.

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Oracle hack could impact payments for hundreds of thousands of businesses

Oracle hack could impact payments for hundreds of thousands of businesses

There's some potentially bad news for a lot of Oracle customers surfacing today, as it seems the company has fallen victim to a data breach. According to KrebsOnSecurity, the breach affected Oracle's MICROS division, which provides point-of-sale systems and support for many businesses around the world. In fact, the number of locations using MICROS around the world comes in at more than 330,000, spread across 180 different countries.

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Yahoo investigating hacker’s claims of massive data breach

Yahoo investigating hacker’s claims of massive data breach

Those of you with a Yahoo account may want to reset your password, as the hacker behind the recent MySpace and LinkedIn data dumps is claiming that he has the details of 200 million Yahoo accounts. He's ready to sell too, posting the lot on the dark web with an asking price of three bitcoins, which amounts to around $1,800.

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It’s not paranoia to cover your laptop’s webcam

It’s not paranoia to cover your laptop’s webcam

Mark Zuckerberg may cover his laptop's webcam and microphone with sticky tape, but you don't have to be the billionaire founder of a massively-popular social network to be sensibly cautious about privacy. A photo shared by the Facebook founder this week - celebrating 500 million Instagram users - piqued the attention of eagle-eyed privacy advocates, who spotted a low-tech solution to helping secure Zuckerberg's laptop.

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The Pentagon expands program for hackers to test its security

The Pentagon expands program for hackers to test its security

Back in March, the US's Department of Defense launched a "Hack the Pentagon" campaign to get hackers to test their websites and security networks for vulnerabilities, without the threat of jail time. The project was so successful that the government agency has announced it's being expanded, including more DoD websites and networks, with further cash incentives for hackers. Think of it like the bug bounty programs that Google, Facebook, and other tech companies offer, except hackers get to put the government's most secure facilities to the test.

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