Science

EPFL researchers create a nanodevice 100 times faster than current transistors

EPFL researchers create a nanodevice 100 times faster than current transistors

EPFL researchers have developed a device that operates ten times faster than today's fastest transistors. The new device also operates about 100 times faster than transistors that are in current computers. The nanoscale device they have created enables the generation of high-power terahertz waves. The scientist says that those waves are notoriously difficult to produce. Being very difficult to produce, the waves hold promise for a range of applications, including imaging or sensing and high-speed wireless communications.

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NASA’s Orion spacecraft gets one step closer to the moon – and to Mars

NASA’s Orion spacecraft gets one step closer to the moon – and to Mars

Shrink-wrapped and fresh from the belly of the Super Guppy, NASA's Orion spacecraft has returned to the Kennedy Space Center for the big assembly. Scheduled to head out to complete first an orbit of the moon, then land on Earth's satellite, before venturing out to Mars, the spacecraft has just completed some of the toughest testing imaginable.

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Stanford University engineers develop ankle exoskeleton to make running easier

Stanford University engineers develop ankle exoskeleton to make running easier

Engineers at Stanford University have created a device that people could strap to their legs that makes running easier. The team of researchers has investigated a pair of different modes for running assistance. One of the methods was motor-powered assistance, and the other is spring-based assistance.

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Multiple ESA space missions take a hit as coronavirus pandemic grows

Multiple ESA space missions take a hit as coronavirus pandemic grows

The European Space Agency has revealed that multiple current space missions are being impacted by the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. In an announcement on Wednesday, the agency said that it is dialing down its mission operations and sending a number of its mission control center personnel in Germany home to avoid the virus risk. Some instrument operations must be stopped as a result, among other things.

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SpaceX Crew Dragon parachute test fails – but it’s not what you think

SpaceX Crew Dragon parachute test fails – but it’s not what you think

A SpaceX Crew Dragon parachute test didn't end as intended this week, after the parachute system eventually intended to safely lower the spacecraft to the ground failed to deploy. While the failed test isn't being blamed on the Crew Dragon itself, it could still put a serious dampener on SpaceX and NASA's ambitions for the spacecraft.

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NASA reveals Bennu’s entire surface in first high-resolution global map

NASA reveals Bennu’s entire surface in first high-resolution global map

NASA has given the public its first high-resolution look at asteroid Bennu's global surface. The details are revealed in a newly published global map of the asteroid, one that is currently the focus of NASA's OSIRIS-REx space mission. As we've seen in previously shared images, the asteroid has a very rocky surface filled with large boulders, which was an unexpected complication for the OSIRIS-REx mission.

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The NASA Orion spacecraft just hit a huge milestone

The NASA Orion spacecraft just hit a huge milestone

NASA's Orion spacecraft has held up to huge extremes of temperature and more, acing its testing at one of the US space agency's most impressive facilities, as the capsule prepares to head to the Moon. The test process took four months, a vital safety precaution ahead of the Artemis I mission. Success there paves the way for NASA's manned mission to Mars.

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NASA’s next-gen moon thrusters have survived over 60 glowing-hot fire tests

NASA’s next-gen moon thrusters have survived over 60 glowing-hot fire tests

NASA is currently working on components for its future Artemis lunar lander that we use what the space agency calls next-generation thrusters. Those thrusters are small rocket engines that are used to make alterations in the flight path or altitude of a spacecraft. They will be used to enter lunar orbit and to descend to the surface of the moon.

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Purdue University researchers create a device that can detect cellular stiffness

Purdue University researchers create a device that can detect cellular stiffness

Purdue University researchers have created a new device in the lab that could help diagnose cancer that is invading other tissues in the body. One indication that cancer is invading other tissues comes from the stiffening of a structure surrounding cells in the human body. Monitoring changes to that structure, known as the extracellular matrix, could give researchers another way to study the progression of cancer.

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Melting faster than expected, this vast glacier could raise seas by 5 feet

Melting faster than expected, this vast glacier could raise seas by 5 feet

A fast-retreating glacier melted through climate change could release billions of tons of ice, researchers have discovered, enough to raise global sea levels almost five feet. East Antarctica had been considered an area less at risk for glacial melt by scientists tracking global warming, but new findings published this week suggest that is not in fact the case.

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KAIST researchers develop an ultra-thin camera with an insect eye structure

KAIST researchers develop an ultra-thin camera with an insect eye structure

Scientists from KAIST have announced the development of an ultra-thin camera that uses an insect eye structure for high-resolution imaging. The camera uses a unique visual structure that simulates the eyes of insects providing a thinner profile for the lens and wider viewing angle than any commercial camera. The researchers believe that the features will allow the camera to be applied to fields that require various small cameras like mobile, surveillance, medical equipment, and reconnaissance equipment.

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New MIT simulation system teaches autonomous autos real-world crash avoidance

New MIT simulation system teaches autonomous autos real-world crash avoidance

Scientists at MIT have created a new simulation system that they invented to train autonomous autos with infinite steering possibilities. The goal of the simulation system is to help the autonomous autos learn to navigate a range of worst-case scenarios before they are let loose on real streets around the country and world. Control systems for autonomous autos rely heavily on real-world data sets of driving trajectories from human drivers.

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