health

Study: Ibuprofen poses major cardiac arrest risk

Study: Ibuprofen poses major cardiac arrest risk

Ask anyone, and there’s a good chance they’ve casually taken a tablet or two of ibuprofen to stave off a headache or other minor ailment. The general perception is that ibuprofen is a pretty safe drug, the small risk of stomach ulcers aside, and that’s why it is available in large quantities for low prices over the counter. According to a new study, though, this medication is associated with big increases in cardiac arrest risk, so much so that some professionals are calling for it to be made prescription-only.

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Study: audio synced to brainwaves improves memory in elderly

Study: audio synced to brainwaves improves memory in elderly

A new study out of Northwestern Medicine has found that playing audio synced to one’s brainwaves both improves memory in the elderly and improves their deep sleep quality. The memory increase is likely due to the substantial improvements in deep sleep quality, which gets worse as a person gets older, but especially starting in middle age. The discovery could lead to non-medicine-based interventions to improve both memory and sleep quality in older adults and the elderly.

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Amazon Alexa taps WebMD to answer your health questions

Amazon Alexa taps WebMD to answer your health questions

WebMD has announced that its glut of medical and health information is now accessible through Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant, giving users a way to easily ask for health-related information. The information is accessible by asking Alexa health questions, such as, “Alexa, ask WebMD to tell me about insert health condition here.” Alexa, of course, will retrieve the information and then read it back to the user, no smartphones or apps necessary.

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Fitbit’s Alta HR out in April, enhanced sleep tracking incoming

Fitbit’s Alta HR out in April, enhanced sleep tracking incoming

Fitbit today unveiled its first fitness tracker of 2017: the Alta HR. While not exactly a new device, it is a redesign of one of 2016's most popular models, and it comes with some improvements that fans of the first will definitely want to consider. The most important is likely the addition of PurePulse technology, which Fitbit says was the most requested feature from Alta users.

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Nokia rebranding every single Withings device

Nokia rebranding every single Withings device

A whole bunch of new Nokia-branded products will be appearing on store shelves soon, thanks to their deal with Withings. One brand bought the other, and now the products we've reviewed over the past several years will be coming with a Nokia brand instead of Withings'. This re-branding will take place in the summer of 2017 alongside a major update to the Health Mate App and launch of HIPAA-compliant Patient Care Platform.

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Artificial intelligence used to detect very early signs of autism in infants

Artificial intelligence used to detect very early signs of autism in infants

It’s difficult to diagnose infants with autism due to trouble determining whether any behavioral traits common to autism are present. This difficulty is most pronounced before the age of two, and especially before the age of one, resulting in delayed diagnoses. All that may be changing, though, thanks to artificial intelligence and its ability to predict with high accuracy which infants will be diagnosed with autism by their second year.

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Super-early Alzheimer’s detection may hinge on speech patterns

Super-early Alzheimer’s detection may hinge on speech patterns

Detecting dementia and Alzheimer's early is tricky and that's a problem, as early detection -- and thusly early treatment -- is thought to be a very important factor in possibly slowing down the disease's progression. Thanks to studies analyzing the speech and language patterns of individuals eventually diagnosed with these disease, however, researchers may have identified a method for detecting Alzheimer's disease several years or more than a decade earlier than using other methods.

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Experts tentatively OK human gene editing, but with strict rules

Experts tentatively OK human gene editing, but with strict rules

Experts comprising a panel formed by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine have tentatively recommended that human gene editing be allowed to proceed in very limited cases where individuals are at risk of inheriting severe diseases that cannot be prevented by any other means. These edited genes would be passed on to future generations in due time, potentially removing defective genes from entire blood lines. That ample benefit, however, may not be adequate enough to quell concerns.

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Study finds gluten-free diets may be high in arsenic and mercury

Study finds gluten-free diets may be high in arsenic and mercury

Americans have been amidst a low-and-no gluten dieting craze, with many individuals swearing off the protein despite not having celiac disease. Whether gluten sensitivity is a real thing is still a hot debate topic and not without its controversy, but that’s neither here nor there. A new study recently published in Epidemiology has found that cutting gluten entirely out of your diet may result in an increased consumption of heavy metals, causing higher-than-average levels of arsenic and mercury to develop in your body over time.

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These connected Rossignol skis have a built-in computer

These connected Rossignol skis have a built-in computer

As "wearable tech" goes, skis are probably pushing the edges of the definition, but that hasn't stopped PIQ from embedding a whole bunch of technology in a new connected ski. The collaboration between PIQ and slope favorite Rossignol sees the former's PIQ ROBOT nano-computer integrated into the latter's Hero Master skis, offering real-time analysis of how you're doing on the snow. Currently a prototype, it's being shown off for the first time in Munich this week.

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Science confirms misophonia is a real condition

Science confirms misophonia is a real condition

Misophonia -- if you don't have the condition, it can be baffling when you run into someone who does. Individuals with misophonia have a severe intolerance for certain obnoxious sounds, such as gum being chewed loudly. Exposure to such noises provokes a nearly uncontrollable anger in so-called misophonics, a reaction some have tried to paint as irrational or fake. Science, it turns out, disagrees with that criticism, finding that misophonia is indeed a very real condition.

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Hospitals test Gear VR as non-addictive pain management tool

Hospitals test Gear VR as non-addictive pain management tool

Samsung and AppliedVR are working with hospitals to test the Gear VR as a potential pain management tool that doesn’t have the same addiction potential as opioid prescriptions. A trial has tested the Gear VR with both child and adult patients to test whether a library of ‘relaxing landscapes’ and games can help take one’s mind off things like chronic pain and anxiety. Up to 120 hospitals are being sought to participate in the trial.

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