Google Chrome OS

Chromebooks dual-booting Windows 10 is a terrible idea

Chromebooks dual-booting Windows 10 is a terrible idea

After years of being ignored, if not ridiculed, Chromebooks are slowly becoming more interesting and more appealing. Chrome OS, combined with Android and Linux, is transforming into a platform that can make both Microsoft and Apple worry. All of that, however, might be for naught. Because come October, Chromebooks might be declared dead or at least on their way to becoming pointless. And that will be thanks to an admittedly appealing feature that will be introduced by none other than Google itself.

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Chromebook “cheza” to have large 3:2 detachable screen

Chromebook “cheza” to have large 3:2 detachable screen

Once largely panned for being glorified browsers in netbook clothing, Chromebooks are becoming one of the most interesting devices in the computing market today. On the software front, you have Android and Linux apps and, just maybe, even Windows 10 dual booting. On the hardware side, you’re getting new form factors that are threatening to make Android tablets obsolete. There are still some new Chromebooks on the way, including the first one powered by Qualcomm’s latest processor and may come with a large, square-ish detachable design.

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Chrome OS now supports installing arbitrary Linux packages

Chrome OS now supports installing arbitrary Linux packages

Samsung recently presented the Galaxy Tab S4 as the ultimate productivity portable device but initial reviews have been rather scathing. Thanks to its timing, Samsung’s premium tablet is being compared to the likes of the cheaper iPad, the cheaper Surface Go, and, closer to home, Chromebooks. The latter, especially, is getting more and more talented and the latest experimental feature nearly turns it into that ultimate productivity OS. That is if you live and breathe Linux.

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Google’s strategy to take on iPads needs these to succeed

Google’s strategy to take on iPads needs these to succeed

Once belittled as a glorified browser masquerading as a desktop, Google’s Chrome OS is arguably more exciting now than Android. Save for a phone, it now runs on different form factors, including detachable 2-in-1s and standalone tablets. It can run Android apps and, soon, Linux apps as well, both command line and graphical. Chrome OS is definitely now in a better position to take on even the likes of Apple’s iPads, but it will not be enough to simply have Chrome OS tablets or convertibles. Fortunately, Google might already have all that it needs to take it to the next level.

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Acer Chromebook Tab 10 now available for regular consumers [Updated]

Acer Chromebook Tab 10 now available for regular consumers [Updated]

It’s almost puzzling that Google was so proud of the first ever Chrome OS tablet and yet restricted its availability to the education market. Granted, it was really aimed for students and schools anyway, preempting Apple’s launch of the more affordable but Pencil-compatible new iPad. If you have actually been wishing you could get your hands on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10, the good news is that you can now do so. Just be prepared to for what you’ll be getting for that price.

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HP Chromebook x2 variant sounds like the Surface Go

HP Chromebook x2 variant sounds like the Surface Go

Microsoft launched the Surface Go clearly as a response to Apple’s and Google’s stronger push into the education market. Specifically, it’s meant to battle the 2018 iPad and Acer Chromebook Tab 10 head-on. There might, however, be something brewing in the Chrome OS camp that could undo the Surface Go’s advantage. According to a leaked HP technical document, there will be variants of the Chromebook x2, the first detachable Chromebook, on the way, and one of them runs on the same processor as the Surface Go.

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Surface Go takes on Apple, Google and it might just succeed

Surface Go takes on Apple, Google and it might just succeed

Truth be told, there was really no surprise left when Microsoft finally announced the Surface Go other than a confirmation of its existence and its price. It is the affordable Surface that people have been talking about recently and the portable Surface that some may have been waiting for. Of course, Microsoft also confirmed the tough choices that had to be made to keep it small, slim, and affordable. But while it’s not going to appeal to power users, the Surface Go might actually win in its most important battle: taking on the iPad and the new breed of Chrome OS tablets.

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Chromebook “Nocturne” detachable to fix HP Chromebook x2’s flaw

Chromebook “Nocturne” detachable to fix HP Chromebook x2’s flaw

Chromebooks are starting to expand into more than just the “book” factor. But before Acer’s first Chrome OS tablet, there was the HP Chromebook x2, the first detachable Chromebook. For its price and specs, it was a near-perfect portable Chromebook save for one critical flaw: its keyboard had no backlight. Fortunately, it seems that an upcoming detachable Chromebook will correct that mistake and push the Chrome OS envelope again.

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18 Chromebooks get Linux app support

18 Chromebooks get Linux app support

If you thought Chrome OS was just a boring glorified web browser turned OS, then your impressions are woefully outdated. Next to still unofficial, or even unconfirmed, platforms like Google Fuchsia or Microsoft Andromeda, Chrome OS is shaping up to be one of the most exciting operating systems of late. That is, if you owned a Google Pixelbook or one of the more recent, more powerful, more expensive recent Chromebooks. Worry not because Google has just recently flipped the switch that will give even the cheaper and older ones some powerful features, namely Linux app support.

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Acer Chromebook Tab 10 gets Android-like features

Acer Chromebook Tab 10 gets Android-like features

While Google is probably wishing the world forgot about its less than stellar history with Android tablets, it isn’t writing out the device form factor completely. It is, instead, reframing tablets within the context of Chrome OS, particularly with its first tablet, the Acer Chromebook Tab 10. But in order to do that, it has to bring some features over from Android to Chrome OS, which is what it’s doing now with its education-themed update.

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Chromebooks with Linux can run Windows apps but it’s not easy

Chromebooks with Linux can run Windows apps but it’s not easy

It really seems that Chrome OS is being groomed to be the one OS that runs them all. Well almost all. In addition to its native Chrome-based platform, it now supports Android through Google Play Store and, just recently, Linux. Because of those two, it is also possible to run Windows programs to some extent. CodeWeavers, which develops software for running Windows programs on Mac and Linux, has just shown what could be a better way to run those same programs on a Chromebook.

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Future Chromebooks might have eSIM, Project Fi support

Future Chromebooks might have eSIM, Project Fi support

Still don’t believe that Chromebooks are out to get Android tablets? This latest clue could be one of the nails on that Android coffin. While Chromebooks have always been designed as portable devices, give or take a few grams, they haven’t exactly been completely portable because of one thing: reliance on Wi-Fi connectivity. That could be changing in the next generation of Chrome OS devices with signs that Chrome OS is getting support for eSIMs that will integrate with Google’s own Project Fi as well as other carriers’ networks.

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