Science

Scientists unveil one of the largest 3D maps of the early universe

Scientists unveil one of the largest 3D maps of the early universe

Astronomers have been working on a massive 3D map of what they call the infant universe. The map was unveiled in Europe by a team led by Dr. David Sobral of Lancaster University. The giant map was made using the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii and the Issac Newton telescope in the Canary Islands.

Continue Reading

Life on Venus could flourish – tiny but hardy – in the clouds

Life on Venus could flourish – tiny but hardy – in the clouds

Extraterrestrial life could be closer than we think, flourishing in the clouds around Venus, though think along the lines of microbes rather than little green men. The possibility of Venus' clouds being habitable was first raised back in the 60s, with subsequent probes dispatched to the planet confirming that the idea wasn't entirely improbable.

Continue Reading

50 huge dinosaur footprints from Middle Jurassic found in Scotland

50 huge dinosaur footprints from Middle Jurassic found in Scotland

Researchers have discovered a cache of massive dinosaur footprints in Scotland, ones that date back to the Mid-Jurassic period. About 50 footprints in total were found, each helping reveal information about that time period. Researchers with the University of Edinburgh say the discovery is very important due to the relative lack of Middle Jurassic period evidence.

Continue Reading

NASA’s new X-plane: The next sonic boom

NASA’s new X-plane: The next sonic boom

This week we're getting an idea of what it'll be like to travel at supersonic speeds thanks to NASA's newest initiative. They've awarded a contract to Lockheed Martin Skunk Works to create the next X-plane. This experimental craft is aimed at 55,000 feet above the earth at a speed of about 940 mph - but without the big boom. Their aim is to make this X-plane fly at supersonic speeds without so much of the big boom of sound that's always come with said speeds.

Continue Reading

Pasta isn’t the diet villain you think it is, new study claims

Pasta isn’t the diet villain you think it is, new study claims

Pasta may not be as terrible for your diet as popular dieting brands suggest. A study newly published in BMJ Open details a "systematic review and meta-analysis" of existing randomized controlled trials in helping determine whether pasta is as bad as some believe. According to the findings, participants in clinical trials who consumed an average of 3.3 servings of pasta per week instead of other carbs didn't gain weight because of it.

Continue Reading

9 billion light years away, this is the furthest star we’ve ever seen

9 billion light years away, this is the furthest star we’ve ever seen

We're used to telescopes bringing us a glimpse of distant galaxies, but just how far away can we actually see through the universe? According to NASA, the answer is "more than halfway across": the American space agency has released a new photo from the Hubble Space Telescope, and it's mind-blowing in more ways than one.

Continue Reading

Extinct animals in zoos: How real is Jurassic World today?

Extinct animals in zoos: How real is Jurassic World today?

Today we're exploring a bit of research on a future in which extinct animals could be cloned for scientific and entertainment purposes. Two researchers from the University of Central Lancashire explored three scenarios and/or purposes for which cloned rare or extinct animals might exist. The possibilities are endless, of course, but just beyond the plausibility of cloning rare animals - a real possibility - comes the planning stages for how they must be treated.

Continue Reading

Wearable device monitors electrical activity in the stomach

Wearable device monitors electrical activity in the stomach

Researchers have developed a new wearable device for people that have issues with their stomach. The wearable is able to measure electrical activity in the stomach and could help folks with digestive issues determine if treatments or diets are working. The wearable device still requires clinical validation and uses a technology called electrogastrography or EGG.

Continue Reading

NASA Marsbee flying robotic insects may explore Mars in the future

NASA Marsbee flying robotic insects may explore Mars in the future

NASA recently funded a new potential future way to explore the Red Planet: Marsbee, an insect-like flying robot that could operate in swarms with a rover serving as a base station. Marsbees are described as about the size of a bumblebee with wings like you'd find on a cicada; they don't need much energy and can be recharged from a rover that doubles as a communication center.

Continue Reading

Today’s SpaceX launch is special, but not for the reason you think

Today’s SpaceX launch is special, but not for the reason you think

On the heels of last week's successful Falcon 9 launch that carried 10 Iridium satellites into orbit, SpaceX is ready to take to the skies again today. Assuming the weather cooperates, another Falcon 9 rocket will launch from Cape Canerval today at 4:30 PM Eastern. This time around, the destination is the International Space Station, where it will drop off about 5,800 pounds of supplies to the astronauts currently residing there.

Continue Reading

NASA InSight Mars lander could launch as early as May 5

NASA InSight Mars lander could launch as early as May 5

NASA is talking up its next mission to Mars. The mission will see the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) stationary lander head to the Red Planet. That stationary lander will be the first ever mission meant specifically to explore deep into the interior of Mars.

Continue Reading

China’s Tiangong-1 plummets to death over South Pacific ocean

China’s Tiangong-1 plummets to death over South Pacific ocean

What goes up must come down, especially if you don’t remain in orbit. That is the fate that befell China’s first space station attempt which the country simply told the rest of the world “ceased to function”. While there have been speculations and conspiracies on what happened or the bus-sized station would land, reality is, fortunately, more boring and less dangerous. Space agencies have confirmed that Tiangong-1 re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere and crashed and burned, literally, over the southern Pacific ocean.

Continue Reading