Science

Large amounts of toxic pollution found in deepest trenches

Large amounts of toxic pollution found in deepest trenches

It’s mankind’s dirty secret that its garbage eventually find their way to the open seas. Given the vastness and almost unimaginable depths of the world’s oceans, man might assume that some parts of the ocean remain safe from human indifference. Scientists are proving, however, that it is sadly not the case. By studying amphipods leaving at the world’s deepest trenches, scientists discovered worrying levels of “persistent organic pollutants” inside the crustaceans’ bodies. This means that our toxic waste has already reached places where man itself has barely set foot. To add insult to injury, these are pollutants that have been banned for decades already.

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Trump administration delays bumble bee’s endangered status

Trump administration delays bumble bee’s endangered status

The population of the rusty-patched bumble bee has been noticeably decreasing over the past couple decades, a worrisome trend that sparked federal conservation efforts. Among those efforts was a decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to add the bumble bee to the endangered species list with the ultimate goal of determining how to increase the bee’s population numbers. All that has been halted, however, by the Trump administration.

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Study finds calorie restriction slows aging in mice

Study finds calorie restriction slows aging in mice

A new study recently detailed in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics has found that calorie restriction may slow cellular aging, a conclusion that isn’t entirely new — we’ve seen studies over the past handful of years that detail similar findings. In particular, calorie restriction appears to positively impact ribosomes, the so-called protein-maker of a cell. Slowing down ribosome production lends more time for repair, and, it turns out, slowing down production is as simple as eating less.

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Stunning blue lightning filmed from the International Space Station

Stunning blue lightning filmed from the International Space Station

Researchers at the International Space Station have managed to catch rare blue lightning on camera, giving everyone a look at the phenomenon commonly only spotted by pilots. Such blue flashes aren’t something you’re likely to see from the ground, as they tend to happen above thunderstorms, making them visible to planes above the clouds. In an effort to better study them, the researchers were asked to point a special camera above one such thunderstorm.

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Algae survived 16 months in space outside of the ISS

Algae survived 16 months in space outside of the ISS

Algae can survive exposure in space for a long duration of time, according to the results of a relatively recent experiment aboard (sort of) the International Space Station. The results have been described as ‘astonishing,’ with researchers finding that despite exposure to the vacuum of space, extreme temperature changes, and both UV and cosmic radiation, the algae was able to survive for 16 months on the exterior of the ISS, demonstrating an incredible hardiness.

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Trump just halted a federal bid to save bumblebees

Trump just halted a federal bid to save bumblebees

The Trump administration's executive order on Federal Regulations has delayed the listing of the Rusty Patched Bumblebee as an endangered species in the United States. Because listing a bumblebee as an endangered species would extend federal protection to said bee, a federal regulation would be put in place. Because of Trump's January 20th executive order on federal regulations, a 60-day freeze was put in effect for all regulations published in the official register at the time of the order's signing.

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Big green fireball caught on video streaking through Midwest sky

Big green fireball caught on video streaking through Midwest sky

A giant fireball streaked across the dark Midwest sky over the United States this past Monday, and was spotted by individuals in multiple states, including Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, and even some as far away as West Virginia. The majority of reports seem to center around Chicago and eastern Wisconsin, though thanks to a couple of dash cams and webcams, everyone gets to have their own look at the event.

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Researchers discover ancient undersea landslide near Australia

Researchers discover ancient undersea landslide near Australia

Researchers have discovered a huge undersea landslide located on the Great Barrier Reef, one said to have formed about 300,000 years ago. The region has been dubbed the Gloria Knolls Slide, and it is said to be about 47 miles from Queensland, Australia. The slip was formed by a large scale collapse of sediment in the region, something to the tune of 32 cubic kilometers' worth.

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Bill Nye Saves the World arrives on Netflix in April

Bill Nye Saves the World arrives on Netflix in April

Back in August, we heard that Bill Nye would be teaming up with Netflix to produce a new, science-focused show. '90s kids, remembering countless hours in science class watching Bill Nye the Science Guy, were immediately excited for this new premiere, but at the time of the announcement, Netflix was painfully short on details. All we were told is that the new series, called Bill Nye Saves the World, would launch sometime in 2017.

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This “fish-scale” lizard sheds its scale to escape

This “fish-scale” lizard sheds its scale to escape

Lizards are quite famous for their ability to voluntarily cut off and sacrifice their tail in order to escape with their lives. But for some types of lizards, that isn't the only thing they can shed. A specific genus named Geckolepis, endemic to Madagascar and the Comoro archipelago, also known as "fish-scale geckos", can also quickly remove their scales if needed, making them not only harder to capture but also harder to study. Which makes the classification of a new Geckolepis megalepis an even bigger accomplishment than it sounds.

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Ancient slug fossil reveals spiky ‘armor,’ hints about evolution

Ancient slug fossil reveals spiky ‘armor,’ hints about evolution

A newly published study details a unique-looking ancient slug that had a protective ‘armor’ composed of small spikes. This discovery helps shed light on the evolution of mollusks, revealing that they didn’t exactly have shells in the popular sense of the word, but weren’t entirely without protection, either. The fossils were found several years ago by an enthusiastic collector.

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5,000-year-old Chinese beer replicated using ancient recipe

5,000-year-old Chinese beer replicated using ancient recipe

Remember the ancient Chinese beer discovery publicized last year? It was a notable discovery for multiple reasons, including shedding light on agriculture in China at the time and giving modern humans an ancient recipe used to create beer. Now students at Stanford University have set out to recreate that beer, doing so following along with the ancient recipe. Some of the resulting beer was described as less than desirable, but others were successful.

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