Science

Einstein’s speed of light constant could be proven wrong

Einstein’s speed of light constant could be proven wrong

Albert Einstein might be known for a great many things, but even the layman might be familiar with at least one thing: E = mc2, the formula for mass-energy equivalence. However, a critical part of that formula might soon be debunked. According to Einstein’s physics, light has, does, and always will travel at a constant speed. Some physicists and cosmologists have begun challenging that observation, and may just have gotten closer to proving that the venerable scientist may have been wrong.

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TIM robot keeps the Large Hadron Collider in tiptop shape

TIM robot keeps the Large Hadron Collider in tiptop shape

Robots might be thought of taking over human’s jobs or, in the future, the world, but their first real-world uses were in areas too dangerous for humans or for tasks that human physiology just isn’t equipped for. Such is the job of TIM, the Large Hadron Collider’s “security” robot. But unlike what you might think of a security bot, TIM doesn’t protect the LHC and its humans from external threats. Instead, it prowls the innards of the facility, monitoring for environmental dangers to one of the world’s most sophisticated scientific equipment.

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SpaceX wins contract to launch ocean-monitoring satellite for NASA

SpaceX wins contract to launch ocean-monitoring satellite for NASA

Despite their recent troubles over a rocket explosion, Elon Musk's SpaceX has won another contract from NASA to launch a satellite for the agency. April 2021 will see the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite sent into orbit on one of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rockets that's launched from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base.

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Schiaparelli lander’s mysterious crash partially solved

Schiaparelli lander’s mysterious crash partially solved

On 19th October, the European Space Agency rejoiced as its first ExoMars mission successfully completed one of two initial goals. The Trace Gas Orbiter was finally in orbit around its red planet target. However, rejoicing gave way to scratched heads and furrowed brows as the second part of that phase remained in question. The Schiaparelli lander had mysteriously vanished after it detached from the orbiter to land on the surface. Its remains were found three days later and now the ESA has released its initial findings on what may have caused its premature demise.

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Climate change hits Arctic hard as Trump set to drop NASA funding

Climate change hits Arctic hard as Trump set to drop NASA funding

President-elect Trump may cut NASA's climate research funding despite a pair of new reports highlighting unexpected spikes in Arctic temperatures. According to a recent report from Stanford, quickly rising temperatures in the Arctic have affected ecology and industries around the world, and things are set to get worse if 'we lose too much more ice.' Despite this, Trump is set to wipe out NASA’s climate research in favor of deep space exploration.

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Flexible supercapacitor could mean smartphones that charge in seconds

Flexible supercapacitor could mean smartphones that charge in seconds

Scientists at the University of Central Florida have devised a new process for making flexible supercapacitors. These supercapacitors can store more energy than previous flexible supercapacitors and can be recharged over 30,000 times without degrading. The scientists think that the new approach could one day revolutionize technology ranging from mobile phones to electric vehicles.

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See Ceres’ bright spot up close in latest NASA space photo

See Ceres’ bright spot up close in latest NASA space photo

Remember the formerly mysterious bright spots on Ceres that intrigued researchers and the Internet alike? The space agency has released a new photograph shot by the Dawn spacecraft, and in it we get a clear, up-close look at one of these bright spots and the crater in which it is located. The spot isn't very shiny and bright in this photo; rather, we see just how rough the terrain in this area is.

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Confederate time capsule found, contents mostly destroyed

Confederate time capsule found, contents mostly destroyed

An unexpected Confederate time capsule was found beneath the Confederate monument near the University of Louisville, but unfortunately it doesn’t hold any well-preserved treasure. The contents in the box are probably destroyed, according to the city mayor, as the capsule itself was waterlogged. The time capsule is made of brass, per initial reports, and was only half a foot beneath the monument. The discovery was made yesterday during construction work.

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Stanford scientists figure out how to send texts using window cleaner and vinegar

Stanford scientists figure out how to send texts using window cleaner and vinegar

Researchers at Stanford University have devised a way to allow for communication that sounds like something out of a science fiction film. The team working on the project figured out how to send messages using household chemicals. Researcher Nariman Farsad began working on the project and it is an area of study that few in the world are investigating at this time.

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NOAA GOES-R weather satellite launch goes off without a hitch

NOAA GOES-R weather satellite launch goes off without a hitch

NASA has announced a successful launch of a highly advanced National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather satellite. The satellite is called the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R or GOES-R. The launch happened at 6:42 p.m. EST on November 19 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The GOES-R satellite will boost the nation's weather observation capability allowing more accurate and timely weather forecasts, watches, and warnings.

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SpaceX Mars ITS fuel tank tests end in success

SpaceX Mars ITS fuel tank tests end in success

SpaceX just moved one step closer to realizing its dreams of a mission to Mars. The company has been recently testing a lot of the components that will make the trip to Mars, with the latest test being one for the massive fuel tank that will be attached to its Interplanetary Transport System. SpaceX announced this week that the tests were a success, taking to Twitter to share a photo of the tests in progress.

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Ballu is part blimp and part robot

Ballu is part blimp and part robot

The robotics researchers at the UCLA Robotics & Mechanisms Laboratory have created a cool new robot that looks very different from the fancy and complex robots we are used to seeing researchers kick out. This robot is called Ballu and that stands for Buoyancy Assisted Lightweight Legged Unit. It has a body made using a helium balloon and that balloon stands on a spindly pair of legs that look like a crane's legs.

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