Science

Scientists warn climate change will bring more severe storms

Scientists warn climate change will bring more severe storms

A new study warns that severe rainstorms are likely to become more common in coming years due to climate change, a statement that contrasts some observations made by other researchers and studies. According to this paper, which is in the pipeline for the journal Nature Climate Change, the peak temperature for intensive rainstorms is moving upward as global temperatures increase.

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Wooly mammoths experienced ‘genomic meltdown’ before extinction

Wooly mammoths experienced ‘genomic meltdown’ before extinction

A new study details the severe evolutionary changes that affected the wooly mammoth shortly before it went extinct. Among those changes, researchers have found that wooly mammoths experienced a great reduction in their ability to smell, as well as changes that produced a satin fur coat and other things. The changes took place in a small popular of wooly mammoths living in isolation on Wrangel island.

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Scientists find evidence of oldest life on Earth

Scientists find evidence of oldest life on Earth

A team of researchers in Canada have found what might be the oldest set of fossils in the history of the world. These fossils have been found inside a rock which has been dated at 3.7-billion years old. This set of life forms is rather unique in their age relative to that of the Earth's formation at 4.5-billion years ago.

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NASA satellite makes evasive maneuver to dodge Mars’ Phobos moon

NASA satellite makes evasive maneuver to dodge Mars’ Phobos moon

NASA had a bit of excitement earlier this week, with its Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s flight controllers having to send commends to the MAVEN spacecraft, making it perform an evasive maneuver to avoid smashing into one of Mars’ moons, Phobos. The spacecraft was forced to speed up by about 1.3ft/second, an adjustment that tweaked MAVEN’s orbit and allowed it to skirt by Phobos without incident.

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The oldest fossils ever may have been found in Canada

The oldest fossils ever may have been found in Canada

Researchers have discovered what might end up being the oldest fossils ever found, it has been announced, ones that fall into the so-called “microfossils” designation. You can’t see these tiny fossils with the naked eye, as they are the fossils of microbes from the ancient world. Their exact age isn’t known, but they’re estimated to be — at minimum — 3.77 billion years old, eclipsing the previous confirmed 3.5 billion year old microfossils.

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Wireless arm patch reduces migraine pain without meds

Wireless arm patch reduces migraine pain without meds

A new study out of Neurology reveals that a wireless patch could be a simple way to reduce the pain of migraines, being just as effective as drugs. The patch is designed to be worn on one’s arm, where it then produces electrical stimulation that disrupts pain signals before they can get to the brain. Users are able to control the patch using a related smartphone app. Unlike medication, this wireless patch has no side effects, says researchers.

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SpaceX will fly two private passengers around the moon in 2018

SpaceX will fly two private passengers around the moon in 2018

SpaceX will make its first private space flight with public passengers next year, with two private individuals coughing up the cash for a round-trip around the moon. The flight, which is scheduled to take place some time in 2018, will use SpaceX's Dragon 2 craft. Though that has so far been used to make unmanned supply missions up the International Space Station, it was always intended to one day transport human occupants.

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Researchers urge caution over bringing back extinct species

Researchers urge caution over bringing back extinct species

News of researchers’ efforts to bring back the long-extinct wooly mammoth has caught the public’s attention, and while the prospect is interesting, many are against it. That project in particular has its own controversies, such as whether it is ethical to bring back a creature that will have no social group of its own, but the entire de-extinction project as a whole is also not without its potential issues.

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Study: Neanderthal genes are still affecting humans

Study: Neanderthal genes are still affecting humans

Neanderthals haven’t existed for the better part of 40,000 years, but their genes continue to affect present day humans in important ways. According to a new study, Neanderthal DNA resulting from the mating of Neanderthals with humans is still active in 52 varieties of human tissue, influencing gene expression. This influence includes things like making people taller and reducing one’s odds of developing schizophrenia.

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SpaceX Dragon capsule successfully docks with International Space Station

SpaceX Dragon capsule successfully docks with International Space Station

It's been a somewhat turbulent week for the SpaceX Dragon capsule, but today SpaceX and NASA announced that it has successfully docked with the International Space Station. The rocket carrying the capsule was originally scheduled to launch on Saturday, but was delayed at the last second. SpaceX and NASA tried again the next day, and managed to pull off not only a perfect launch, but a perfect landing of the booster that sent the Dragon capsule into space.

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Birth Control pills saved 200k lives in 10 years, say scientists

Birth Control pills saved 200k lives in 10 years, say scientists

A study conducted by a group at Oxford showed that 200,000 lives have been saved from endometrial cancer over a 9-year period. This group, known better as the Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies on Endometrial Cancer (Oxford), showed that "about 400 000 cases of endometrial cancer before the age of 75 years have been prevented over the past 50 years (1965–2014) by oral contraceptives." Their conclusion, based on this study, is that use of oral contraceptives (birth control pills), confers long-term protection against edometrial cancer.

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Super-early Alzheimer’s detection may hinge on speech patterns

Super-early Alzheimer’s detection may hinge on speech patterns

Detecting dementia and Alzheimer's early is tricky and that's a problem, as early detection -- and thusly early treatment -- is thought to be a very important factor in possibly slowing down the disease's progression. Thanks to studies analyzing the speech and language patterns of individuals eventually diagnosed with these disease, however, researchers may have identified a method for detecting Alzheimer's disease several years or more than a decade earlier than using other methods.

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