NHTSA

Apple letter to NHTSA confirms self-driving car ambitions

Apple letter to NHTSA confirms self-driving car ambitions

Just when it seemed like Apple's much-rumored self-driving car project was on the verge of collapse, more evidence surfaces that Cupertino still has plans in place. A recent letter from Apple to the US's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been dug up, where the former writes that it is "investing heavily in the study of machine learning and automation, and is excited about the potential of automated systems in many areas, including transportation."

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The government wants to cripple your phone while driving

The government wants to cripple your phone while driving

US driving safety regulators are pushing for a strict limit on what smartphone tech can be used in the car, recommending phones go into lockdown when plugged into the dashboard. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has published its first set of guidelines on driver distraction for portable and aftermarket devices, effectively outlining its goals for cutting down on unsafe smartphone use while at the wheel. Though not a law, it's nonetheless a strict set of suggestions for how platforms like iOS and Android should behave, including limitations on apps and features that may leave drivers frustrated.

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NHTSA “Quiet Car” safety standard will make hybrids and EVs noisy

NHTSA “Quiet Car” safety standard will make hybrids and EVs noisy

The NHTSA has announced that it has set a new "Quiet Car" safety standard that will make sure that hybrids and EVs make some noise when they are traveling at low speeds. The problem with near silent EVs and hybrids is that people with low vision or who are blind may not know that the vehicles are there leading to accidents if they walk out in traffic ahead of the vehicles. The NHTSA says that mandating a certain noise level will help prevent about 2,400 injuries each year.

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DVD player in Tesla wreck raises distraction questions

DVD player in Tesla wreck raises distraction questions

The crashed Tesla that collided with a truck while in Autopilot mode, killing the driver, had a portable DVD player reportedly still playing "Harry Potter" inside when witnesses rushed to the scene. Investigators of the May accident, in which the electric car's systems apparently failed to see a tractor-trailer crossing the highway ahead due to lighting conditions and the truck's color, are still examining data extracted from the Model S' "black box" but questions had already been raised about what might have distracted the driver.

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Drivers, not ones and zeroes, the biggest roadblock to autonomous cars

Drivers, not ones and zeroes, the biggest roadblock to autonomous cars

Tesla's Autopilot is in safety regulators' crosshairs after one driver died using the system, but the NHTSA's own research suggests unrealistic expectations and human nature may be the biggest risk to semi-automated cars. The crash, in May 2016, saw Joshua D. Brown, 40, of Canton, Ohio die after his 2015 Model S struck a tractor-trailer crossing the divided highway he was using Autopilot on.

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Fatal crash prompts Tesla Autopilot safety investigation

Fatal crash prompts Tesla Autopilot safety investigation

Tesla's Autopilot system in the Model S is the subject of a preliminary investigation by US safety regulators, after a fatal crash by a driver using the semi-autonomous technology. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) confirmed today that it will be making "an examination of the design and performance of any driving aids in use at the time of the crash" in which a driver of a 2015 Model S struck a tractor trailer and was killed.

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Tesla on offensive against NHTSA gag-order allegations

Tesla on offensive against NHTSA gag-order allegations

Tesla has come out fighting against reports that the automaker is trying to cover up car safety issues, and prevent owners from discussing them with federal safety agencies. The accusations came following a report of a broken suspension system in an out-of-warranty Model S, which Tesla offered to help pay for repairs on as part of what the company says now was a "goodwill gesture" to the owner.

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Takata airbag recall doubles in size, Tesla added to affected list

Takata airbag recall doubles in size, Tesla added to affected list

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has doubled the Takata airbag recall in the U.S., announcing that between 35 million and 40 million additional inflators will be added. The announcement was made today, and marks a new record-breaking auto recall, bringing the total number of affected parts up to 69 million. As well, Tesla Motors has been added to the affected list, bringing the number of manufacturers up to 17.

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Google pressures government to fast-track its self-driving cars

Google pressures government to fast-track its self-driving cars

Google is pressuring the US government to green-light more advanced autonomous car testing, including ditching the requirement that prototype vehicles have controls for emergency use. Leader of Google's project, Chris Urmson, has penned a letter to U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx requesting more flexibility in how self-driving vehicles are judged, a move which would not only affect Google but any other company working on such technology.

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Car hacking the next big road threat warns FBI

Car hacking the next big road threat warns FBI

Drivers should be cautious of potential car hacks, the FBI has warned today, pointing out that increasingly connected vehicles open the door to futuristic automotive exploits. The PSA, issued by the Federal Bureau of Investigation along with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Department of Transportation (DoT), recognizes that onboard data connections - whether installed by automakers themselves, or via a third-party accessory by the cars' owners - can be useful, but cautions that we're unlikely to have heard the last of high-profile hacking incidents.

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20 automakers commit to auto-braking cars by 2022

20 automakers commit to auto-braking cars by 2022

Cars that can brake themselves in the case of an emergency will be standard on forecourts by 2022, with twenty automakers agreeing to fit the technology by default on their US models. The voluntary commitment to Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) could prevent an extra 28,000 crashes and 12,000 injuries, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said today.

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Ford F-150 drivers allege brake failure, NHTSA investigates

Ford F-150 drivers allege brake failure, NHTSA investigates

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced an investigation into complaints that some 2013 and 2014 model year Ford F-150 trucks can experience brake failure. According to the NHTSA, the issue could affect about 420,000 of the 3.5-liter V6 pickups; it has received 33 complaints about the possible issue so far, with some drivers reporting their trucks suffered “complete” braking failure, a few instances of which reportedly resulted in crashes.

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