Fire TV

Amazon Fire TV: everything you need to know

Amazon Fire TV: everything you need to know

The living room market has earned itself another contender this April with Amazon Fire TV. This device is a 4.5" x 4.5" x 0.7" (115 mm x 115 mm x 17.5 mm) box with several outputs on its back and its own dedicated remote control, aimed at being connected to your television via HDMI. From there, you’ll be using the internet to watch TV.

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Frequency brings social-curated video to Amazon Fire TV

Frequency brings social-curated video to Amazon Fire TV

Frequency has announced support for the Fire TV, Amazon's new streaming dongle, bringing socially-curated movies and TV to the set-top box. Already supported on iPhone and iPad, as well as certain Samsung smart TVs and other platforms, Frequency pulls in content from AP, National Geographic Wild, and thousands of other online sources into individualized "channels".

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Amazon shows gaming prowess with Fire TV

Amazon shows gaming prowess with Fire TV

In rolling out their Fire TV today, Amazon had an opportunity to take on some incumbent devices. Whether you think their media offerings are adequate or not, one thing is certain: they want to make a name in gaming. In that vein, amazon has introduced their gaming efforts today, hardware and all.

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Amazon Fire TV apps include Netflix, Hulu, ESPN

Amazon Fire TV apps include Netflix, Hulu, ESPN

In Amazon Fire TV is the company’s first look at a real dedicated piece of hardware for the living room. Using a quad-core processor with "dedicated GPU", this device is said by Amazon to be "3x as powerful" as Apple TV, Chromecast, or Roku devices. The device is a box which sits near your television - tiny and unobtrusive (but not quite a dongle, as it were).

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Amazon Fire TV detailed: set-top box of simplicity

Amazon Fire TV detailed: set-top box of simplicity

Today Amazon’s Peter Limp stood on stage to speak about why Amazon’s services need revamping on the variety of streaming devices they’re already pushed to today. Instead of focusing on Amazon’s services specifically, Limp suggested that devices like Roku, Apple TV, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4 needed a push in the "Search" direction for content.

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