medical

Gene expression imaging could lead to new treatments for brain disorders

Gene expression imaging could lead to new treatments for brain disorders

The image you see here represents a first for scientists and researchers and could usher in a new era for treating some brain disorders. The image is the first time that the visualization of epigenetic activity has been performed in a living human brain. The researchers behind the technology hope that it may one day help to figure out the role epigenetics plays in certain brain disorders.

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Wireless sensors the size of dust could allow monitoring of organs and nerves

Wireless sensors the size of dust could allow monitoring of organs and nerves

Devices like the Fitbit are very popular today with their ability to monitor things about the wearer like their sleep habits, heart rate, and activity. In the future devices like the Fitbit might be able to do much more by using tiny wireless sensors that allow the monitoring of nerves and internal organs. These tiny wireless sensors are being developed by the University of California, Berkeley and are said to be the first dust-sized sensors that can be implanted into the body.

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Study review finds little evidence that flossing actually helps

Study review finds little evidence that flossing actually helps

One of the things that we have had to do most of our lives is floss our teeth. The dentist says that this is something you have to do to keep gums and teeth healthy. The federal government even pushes for people to floss their teeth along with the American Dental Association. The catch is that according to the AP after looking at 25 different studies comparing various oral care regimes, it found that there was very little evidence that flossing your teeth actually helps with gum and tooth health.

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Embattled Theranos Inc talks up new minilab test system

Embattled Theranos Inc talks up new minilab test system

Theranos is a heath technology firm that is having massive troubles right at this moment. It's CEO has been banned from running any lab facilities for two years and the company as a whole has been barred from receiving any Medicare or Medicaid payments, often a deathblow in the medical world. Despite all its troubles, Theranos is still trying to get new gear onto the market and its CEO Elizabeth Holmes has recently talked up the company’s new minilab.

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Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

This may look like how Eleven started as an infant in Stranger Things, but it's actually a device that is designed to help infants who are at risk of developing cerebral palsy. This condition covers a range of early neurological disorders that affect movement and muscle coordination and can be caused from a number of factors. Those factors include brain damage during birth, infection, and trauma.

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Kinsa Elmo smart ear thermometer tracks temps via app

Kinsa Elmo smart ear thermometer tracks temps via app

Everything is connected today from your toothbrush to your TV. It's no surprise that our thermometers are now connected as well. Kinsa has debuted a new ear thermometer that is designed to look like Elmo from Sesame Street and is called the Elmo Smart Ear Thermometer. The connected device mixes the ability to take your temperature along with the ability to track symptoms via the app.

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‘Harpoon’ device eliminates open heart surgery for mitral valve repairs

‘Harpoon’ device eliminates open heart surgery for mitral valve repairs

A new device may revolutionize the world of mitral valve repair, making it possible for surgeons to fix this particular heart problem without having to perform open heart surgery. According to researchers investigating the device, which is called ‘harpoon,’ it has shown 100-percent performance and safety for this medical purpose. Unlike open heart surgery, using the image-guided contraption is safer for the patient, less physically taxing, and requires much less recovery time. In fact, the researchers estimate someone could leave the hospital the day after a mitral valve repair is performed with Harpoon.

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Glaucoma researchers restore partial vision in blind mice

Glaucoma researchers restore partial vision in blind mice

A group of Stanford researchers may have just made significant progress in finding a way to cure or treat Glaucoma, the illness that gradually leads to blindness. In an experiment involving blind mice with a glaucoma-like condition, they managed to restore partial eyesight in the animals, the first time for such an accomplishment in mammals.

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Theranos CEO banned from running lab for 2 years by US regulators

Theranos CEO banned from running lab for 2 years by US regulators

Over the last year, blood-testing startup Theranos has fallen from its position as a rising star in Silicon Valley. The company has become the subject of several federal investigations, been accused of false advertising and unreliable test results, and found to be operating without FDA approval, all following an investigation by The Wall Street Journal eight months ago over recurring irregularities. Now Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes has been federally banned from running a US lab for the next two years.

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Why this vast helium discovery is being called “life-saving”

Why this vast helium discovery is being called “life-saving”

You might associate helium with party balloons and squeaky voices, but the gas is a whole lot more important: that's why scientists have been so worried in recent years of a helium shortage. Vital for everything from MRI scanners through to essential nuclear energy production systems, helium's usefulness has traditionally stood at odds with its relative rarity.

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DARPA program seeks ‘rugged drugs’ that don’t expire

DARPA program seeks ‘rugged drugs’ that don’t expire

Much like the food in your fridge and the cleaning supplies in your closet, the drugs — both over the counter and prescription — in your medicine cabinet have an expiration date. While that expiration date isn’t a hard and fast rule in most cases, at least according to past research on the matter, it does mark a time when one can expect the medication to start losing potency, making it difficult to take proper dosages. Thanks to a new synthetic protein recently detailed by DARPA, however, that reality may itself soon be obsolete.

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FDA approves home stomach pump to combat obesity

FDA approves home stomach pump to combat obesity

This week, the Food and Drug Administration announced its approval of a stomach-draining device called AspireAssist; it is designed to combat obesity via a drainage tube and port implanted in the patient’s stomach, allowing the patient to drain some of their stomach contents after they eat. When used properly, the device will drain about 30-percent of a meal's calories, according to the FDA, essentially serving as an alternative to lap band surgeries.

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