medical

Lab-grown human blood vessels could advance research of vascular disease

Lab-grown human blood vessels could advance research of vascular disease

Scientists have announced a breakthrough in medical technology with the ability to grow what they are calling perfect human blood vessels as organoids in a petri dish. An organoid is a 3D structure that is grown from stem cells that mimics an organ and can be used to study aspects of that organ in a petri dish. The scientists say that this breakthrough could be key to advancing research of vascular diseases like diabetes.

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Study finds cholesterol levels spike during Christmas season

Study finds cholesterol levels spike during Christmas season

The holiday season is known for excessive eating and weight gain, but a new study warns there may be an invisible consequence to this end-of-year consumption: a spike in cholesterol levels. The research comes out of the University of Copenhagen's Department of Clinical Medicine, which found that the odds having elevated cholesterol levels were six times higher after Christmas.

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E-bandages use electricity to speed up skin wound healing

E-bandages use electricity to speed up skin wound healing

Scientists have developed a new electric bandage ("e-bandage") that uses an electric field to speed up the rate of skin wound healing. The technology, which was recently detailed in the journal ACS Nano, was successfully used to speed up wound healing on rats, hinting at a potential treatment for diabetic ulcers and other wounds that take too long to heal.

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Implant can prevent hunger and increase weight loss to fight obesity

Implant can prevent hunger and increase weight loss to fight obesity

The small implantable device seen in the hands of the researcher below is made to fight hunger pangs and help people lose weight. Obesity is an increasing problem around the world with over 700 million adults and children globally considered obese. Obesity can lead to all manner of health problems, and scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison have created an implant that could help the obese lose weight.

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Wearable sensor measures a wide range of light to protect skin

Wearable sensor measures a wide range of light to protect skin

Researchers from Northwestern Medicine and Northwestern's McCormick School of Engineering have created the world's smallest wearable, battery-free sensor. The sensor is designed to measure exposure to light across multiple wavelengths spanning UV to visible light. It's able to record up to three separate wavelengths of light at once.

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Baby girl is the first born to mother with a transplanted uterus from a deceased donor

Baby girl is the first born to mother with a transplanted uterus from a deceased donor

Uterus donations right now are only available to women who have family members that can donate to them. A new technique might broaden the pool of available uterus donors and give more women the option to have a baby. A woman who received a donated uterus from a deceased woman has given birth to a baby. This marks the first time a baby was born from a deceased donor uterus and the first uterine transplantation to occur in Latin America.

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Chinese scientist created human babies using gene editing resistant to HIV

Chinese scientist created human babies using gene editing resistant to HIV

A Chinese scientist called He Jiankui claims to have used a gene-editing tool called CRISPR to modify the genetic material of twin baby girls born this month in China. Gene editing of this sort is banned in the US due to fear of the DNA changes being passed to future generations with the risk of harm to other genes. Some have denounced the researcher for human experimentation and claim that this sort of practice is too unsafe to try.

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LEGO heads swallowed and passed for science so you won’t have to

LEGO heads swallowed and passed for science so you won’t have to

It’s a sad and unavoidable fact of life that innocent as well as not so innocent toddlers love putting things into their mouths. Most of the time it's food but other times it involves things they may perceive as delicious delights. It is a parent’s worst nightmare or at least one of them, and yet toy companies keep on producing potentially dangerous pieces of plastic. That is why a group of pediatricians has taken it upon themselves to go through the weirdest test ever to find out how long it will take for a kid to poop out a LEGO head in case the little one manages to swallow one.

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Apple’s next medical mission: put veterans’ health records in iPhones

Apple’s next medical mission: put veterans’ health records in iPhones

It is still primarily a technology company but Apple has lately been obsessing over one largely untapped market: medical technology and gadgets. It has turned the Apple Watch Series 4 into a miniature diagnostics lab, acquired and invested in medical and health startups, and is slowly but surely turning the iPhone into a digital repository for your medical records. The latter is practically what the company is discussing with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to help turn veterans’ medical records into digital form they can easily access on iPhones and iPads.

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Explorer total-body scanner combines PET and CT scanning for unique internal views

Explorer total-body scanner combines PET and CT scanning for unique internal views

To better diagnose and treat all sorts of medical conditions, researchers and physicians are continually working on new tests and technology. One such new technology is a total-body scanner called Explorer that is the first medical imaging scanner in the world that can capture a 3D picture of the entire human body all at once. The very first scans from the device have been made public, and they are incredibly detailed.

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Deep Learning AI diagnosed Alzheimer’s 6-years earlier than conventional methods

Deep Learning AI diagnosed Alzheimer’s 6-years earlier than conventional methods

One of the most important things for combating Alzheimer's disease is early diagnosis so treatments for the condition can start before damage is severe. The earlier interventions start, the better the outcome for the person suffering from the condition. A new study was published to the medical journal Radiology has found that early prediction for Alzheimer's disease later in life can be made using PET brain scans and AI technology.

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Trio of paraplegics walk again thanks to electrical stimulation

Trio of paraplegics walk again thanks to electrical stimulation

Medical researchers around the world are working hard to develop new treatments and technology that could one day help those suffering from paraplegia to walk again. In a new study called STIMO (STImulation Movement Overground) three paraplegics who sustained cervical spinal cord injuries many years ago can walk again using crutches or a walker. The recovery of the ability to walk with aids is thanks to a rehab protocol that uses targeted electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord and weight assisted therapy.

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