medical

Soccer player head injuries could be reduced by adjusting the ball

Soccer player head injuries could be reduced by adjusting the ball

Over the last several years, a lot of focus has been put on the significance and consequence of head injuries involved in sports. Researchers at Purdue University say that up to 22 percent of soccer injuries or concussions that result from players using their heads to direct the ball during a game. Researchers say that to reduce the risk of injury, their study recommends preventing how hard the ball hits the head by inflating balls to a lower pressure and swapping them when they get wet.

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Study shows pandemic could end – face masks lower the ERN

Study shows pandemic could end – face masks lower the ERN

A study conducted this year using COVID-19 outbreak and containment data showed that consistent use of facemasks could potentially end the pandemic. The study's focus was fluid flow behavior of respiratory droplets and aerosols through facemasks with a special focus on SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19.

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Researchers claim to have reversed the aging process using an oxygen chamber

Researchers claim to have reversed the aging process using an oxygen chamber

There are many uses for large devices known as hyperbaric oxygen chambers in the medical field. They can be used to treat wounds and can place a human under enough pressure that oxygen can be forced directly into the tissue without the need for blood flow. A group of researchers say they have reversed the aging process in elderly people using the hyperbaric oxygen chamber.

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First COVID-19 at-home test FDA authorized for rapid results

First COVID-19 at-home test FDA authorized for rapid results

The FDA has approved the first at-home COVID-19 test offering rapid results, one that is only available via prescription. The test is designed for use with individuals 14 years or older who potentially have been exposed to the virus, eliminating the need to visit a hospital or doctor's office in person. The approval was given for the test via an Emergency Use Authorization.

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Pandemic isolation may fuel high blood pressure, study warns

Pandemic isolation may fuel high blood pressure, study warns

Pandemic isolation may be fueling an observed increase in blood pressure, at least according to a new study from Favaloro Foundation University Hospital in Argentina. The study was conducted after healthcare workers at the hospital noticed a spike in blood pressure during a multi-month period of mandatory social isolation.

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Harvard study finds big benefits to 12-minute bursts of exercise

Harvard study finds big benefits to 12-minute bursts of exercise

A new study from the Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has been published, and it found short bursts of physical exercise can have a significant impact on health. The research team describes in their paper that about 12 minutes of acute cardiopulmonary exercise affected more than 80 percent of circulating metabolites. Short bursts of exercise also impacted pathways linked to a wide range of favorable health outcomes identifying potential mechanisms that might contribute to a better understanding of cardiometabolic benefits of exercise.

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Study finds 20 percent of COVID-19 patients receive a psychiatric diagnosis

Study finds 20 percent of COVID-19 patients receive a psychiatric diagnosis

Researchers at the University of Oxford in the Department of Psychiatry and the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Center published a study that reports the first large-scale evidence indicating COVID-19 survivors are at an increased risk of psychiatric disorders. The study used TriNetX electronic health records of 69 million people in the US, including 62,000 cases of COVID-19. Within 90 days following a positive test for COVID-19, one in five survivors was diagnosed with anxiety, depression, or insomnia for the first time.

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Biomedical parts created using new cold spray 3D printing process

Biomedical parts created using new cold spray 3D printing process

Researchers led by scientists from Cornell have developed a new 3D printing technique that creates cellular metallic materials using a unique process that smashes powder particles together at supersonic speeds. The technology is known as "cold spray" and creates a mechanically robust and porous structure 40 percent stronger than similar material made with conventional manufacturing processes. The small size of the structures and porosity makes them well suited to build biomedical components, like replacement joints.

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Apple Watch NightWare nightmare disorder app gets FDA authorization

Apple Watch NightWare nightmare disorder app gets FDA authorization

Many smartwatches and fitness bands these days offer some form of sleep monitoring or another. The most they can do, however, is tell you how well or poorly you slept. There's really not much help it can offer to those suffering from regular nightmares, especially those induced by PTSD. That may soon be changing, even if only a little bit, with the FDA's approval to market the NightWare system for the Apple Watch precisely to help reduce adult sleep disturbance caused by these nightmares.

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Study warns climate change may fuel higher rates of cancer

Study warns climate change may fuel higher rates of cancer

Researchers in California are warning that climate change may bring about more cancer, particularly severe ones like lung cancer. The findings are based on an analysis of almost 60 existing studies, noting that climate change has an impact on public health that is expected to get worse as temperatures rise, wildfires become more common, and air quality decreases.

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Florida will release 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes

Florida will release 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes

Local officials in Florida have announced that they have approved 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes to be released into the environment to reduce local populations of the bloodsucking creatures. The goal of releasing genetically modified mosquitoes is to help reduce the number of mosquitoes carrying diseases like dengue or the Zika virus. Approval to release the bugs came after environmental groups warned of unintended consequences.

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Denmark to cull all mink after warning about ‘serious’ virus mutation risk

Denmark to cull all mink after warning about ‘serious’ virus mutation risk

Denmark officials have announced a decision to cull millions of mink due to mutated coronavirus that may be transmitted to humans. Government officials call this a difficult decision due to the impact it will have on the nation's mink farmers, but warn that it is necessary due to the mutated virus's alleged resistance to antibodies and the risk that a future vaccine may not protect against the mutation.

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