medical

Apple Watch Series 4 ECG: What you need to know

Apple Watch Series 4 ECG: What you need to know

The Apple Watch Series 4 may have a big, beautiful new screen, but it's the wearable's healthcare features which will arguably make it a must-have gift this holiday season. As well as tracking when you may have fallen over, the smartwatch also adds heart health monitoring, with the ability to take an electrocardiogram directly form the wearable itself.

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Theranos loses blood, will finally dissolve

Theranos loses blood, will finally dissolve

Silicon Valley is best known for being the home of dreams, startups, and unicorns. It also sometimes happens to be home to scams and scandals. There is perhaps no bigger example of both than Theranos, the blood-testing company that turned out to be a money-sucking fraud instead. Or so says the charges hurled against it. While its executives continue to deny the accusations, the company itself is finally calling it quits and will soon formally dissolve. And whatever it has left will be used to pay unsecured creditors.

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Simple eye test may diagnose Alzheimer’s before symptoms appear

Simple eye test may diagnose Alzheimer’s before symptoms appear

New research indicates that a simple non-invasive eye exam may one day offer the solution to detecting Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear. The secret lies in the center of the retina, which may thin considerably in individuals with high levels of proteins associated with the disease. Researchers found signs of reduced blood flow, as well.

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MIT ReMix system could usher in new era of cancer treatment

MIT ReMix system could usher in new era of cancer treatment

MIT researchers led by Professor Dina Katabi are working on a new system called ReMix that is described as a GPS system for the human body. The system is meant to allow the precise location of ingested markers inside the body. Those sensors can be very tiny because they need no internal power source and don’t have to make the wireless signals on their own.

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Researchers say e-cigarette vapor boosts inflammation and disables protective cells

Researchers say e-cigarette vapor boosts inflammation and disables protective cells

Lots of people out there have moved from normal cigarette smoking to puffing on e-cigs or vaping as it's commonly known. The thought by many of these folks is that vaping is safer than smoking cigarettes. New research conducted by scientists at the University of Birmingham has found that e-liquid that is vaporized in an e-cigarette has a similar effect on the lungs and body as seen in normal cigarette smokers.

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Probiotic supplement use may cause debilitating brain fog

Probiotic supplement use may cause debilitating brain fog

Probiotics, an increasingly popular supplement, may cause debilitating brain fog in some individuals. The findings are detailed in a study newly published in Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, which explains that some subjects had to quit their jobs due to mental cloudiness. D-lactic acid produced by the large bacteria colonies in the patients' small intestines may have been the cause.

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Eating insects may improve gut bacteria, reduce inflammation: study

Eating insects may improve gut bacteria, reduce inflammation: study

Insects are a common food item in some parts of the world, but have been slow to catch on in the US. Despite the potential environmental benefits of consuming edible insects, many people remain adverse to the idea of eating crickets, ants, and similar critters. A newly published study may help change their minds, finding evidence that consuming crickets may have a beneficial effect on gut bacteria and inflammation levels.

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Google Glass finds new purpose in autism therapy

Google Glass finds new purpose in autism therapy

It was almost laughed out of tech circles for its design and its not so obvious camera raised all sorts of privacy red flags. But now those features are the very same things that could vindicate the Google Glass in at least one very specific application: helping kids with autism learn to socialize better. At least that’s the preliminary finding of a Stanford study that utilizes the Google Glass to identify facial expressions. And, unsurprisingly, there’s some AI involved as well.

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Simple transplant turns “bad” fat into energy-burning brown fat

Simple transplant turns “bad” fat into energy-burning brown fat

Researchers with Columbia University's engineering school have developed a "simple tissue-grafting approach" that converts white fat into brown fat, which burns large amounts of energy to generate heat. Unlike existing methods, which are uncomfortable or potentially full of side effects, the transplant procedure is described as simple enough to one day perform in a doctor's office.

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Obesity sans other risk factors doesn’t increase mortality rate: study

Obesity sans other risk factors doesn’t increase mortality rate: study

A newly published study reveals that obesity in the absence of other metabolic risk factors does not, by itself, increase the individual's risk of death. The research comes out of York University's Faculty of Health, which found that obesity in the absence of diabetes, high blood pressure, and similar isn't associated with increased mortality. The findings are based on a study covering more than 54,000 adults who had either obesity by itself or obesity with other metabolic risk factors.

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Study finds high blood pressure associated with Alzheimer’s disease

Study finds high blood pressure associated with Alzheimer’s disease

A newly published study has linked high blood pressure to brain diseases, including Alzheimer's. Researchers specifically point to blood pressure later in life, finding that patients with higher systolic blood pressure had a greater risk of brain lesions. The study followed 1288 older individuals until their death, at which point their brains were studied.

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This drug may stop Parkinson’s disease, human trials set for 2019

This drug may stop Parkinson’s disease, human trials set for 2019

A newly published study details an experimental drug that may be able to stop the progression of Parkinson's disease. The study, which was conducted by researchers with Johns Hopkins University, saw positive results in lab mice tested with the drugs and similar effects were seen with tests on cultures of human brain cells. Researchers indicate that human clinical trials of the drug may start as soon as next year.

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