medical

Facebook B8 device will help you “hear with your skin”

Facebook B8 device will help you “hear with your skin”

The folks at the Facebook innovation lab "Building 8" have announced Project: Hear With Your Skin, one of two projects aimed at new types of communication. "Two projects focused on new capabilities of communication" is what the folks at Building 8 (B8) are suggesting this set is all about - the other is "Project: Type With Your Brain". With Project: Hear With Your Skin, work begins by developing and building the hardware and software Facebook will need to "delivery language through the skin."

Continue Reading

Apple tipped to be working on non-invasive glucose monitor

Apple tipped to be working on non-invasive glucose monitor

Wearables are great for keeping track of activity and reminding us to stay fit, but they are hardly medical devices. The closest some, but not all, get is having a heart rate monitor or a blood oxygen level sensor. In the very near future, however, at least one wearable might have one more thing: a sugar level monitor. According to insider sources, Apple is probably closer anyone has ever been to creating the holy grail of the intersection of medicine and mobile technology: a glucose monitor that you can simply wear on your skin, just like an Apple Watch.

Continue Reading

Birth Control pills saved 200k lives in 10 years, say scientists

Birth Control pills saved 200k lives in 10 years, say scientists

A study conducted by a group at Oxford showed that 200,000 lives have been saved from endometrial cancer over a 9-year period. This group, known better as the Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies on Endometrial Cancer (Oxford), showed that "about 400 000 cases of endometrial cancer before the age of 75 years have been prevented over the past 50 years (1965–2014) by oral contraceptives." Their conclusion, based on this study, is that use of oral contraceptives (birth control pills), confers long-term protection against edometrial cancer.

Continue Reading

Study: schizophrenia symptoms ‘significantly reduced’ by B vitamins

Study: schizophrenia symptoms ‘significantly reduced’ by B vitamins

A new study funded by the University of Manchester and The Medical Research Council reveals that B vitamins may ‘significantly reduce’ schizophrenic symptoms in afflicted individuals. Those B vitamins include the most common ones like B6 and B12, and may greatly aid standard treatments for schizophrenia to improve the outcome for patients. The finding were recently published in the Psychological Medicine journal.

Continue Reading

This “sensor pill” can be powered by your stomach acid

This “sensor pill” can be powered by your stomach acid

Electronic devices are invading every aspect of our lives and, soon, even our own bodies. Pills that contain sensors that transmit data from inside the human body have long been a holy grail for scientists and doctors but they have always been stumped by one critical part of the setup: the power source. Now researchers from MIT might have gotten one step closer by harvesting electricity from the most ubiquitous material inside our stomachs: our own stomach acid.

Continue Reading

Jawbone said to be abandoning consumer wearables for clinical health products

Jawbone said to be abandoning consumer wearables for clinical health products

We've known that Jawbone has been in trouble for quite some time now, with last year seeing reports about the maker of the UP band ending production of it fitness wearables, as well as looking to sell its portable speaker business. Jump forward to 2017, and the latest news about the company is that it's looking to completely drop consumer wearable products and pivot towards products and services for clinical health use.

Continue Reading

Cancer cured in two infants using genetically engineered T-cells

Cancer cured in two infants using genetically engineered T-cells

Researches recently used genetically-engineered T-cells from a donor to cure two infants of their leukemia, according to a newly published study, hinting at a future in which leukemia treatments may be simple and relatively inexpensive. Per the study detailed in Science Translational Medicine, the work done by London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital was a first attempt at such a treatment, proving wildly successful.

Continue Reading

Stanford researchers cure diabetes in mice using rat-grown organ

Stanford researchers cure diabetes in mice using rat-grown organ

Researchers with Stanford University and the University of Tokyo have announced a new breakthrough treatment that successfully cured mice of diabetes using a rat-grown mouse pancreas. The achievement could help lead to future treatments — or possibly even a cure — for diabetes in humans. Even better, these lab grown organs are genetically matched to the recipient, meaning anti-rejection drugs only need to be taken for a few days rather than one’s entire life.

Continue Reading

Humans have a new organ and it’s been there for ages

Humans have a new organ and it’s been there for ages

You’d think that, by now, scientists would have gotten every body part identified and classified. But as the eternal mystery of the appendix proves, there are still parts of our body we have failed to grasp. Take for example the news that we have a new organ. No, we didn’t grow one over the decades as part of evolution (though some would wish we indeed grew more hands or arms). No, we’ve had the mesentery for as long as we had intestines, but it’s only now that it’s being raised to the status of “organ” from “anonymous tissue structure”.

Continue Reading

Nikon to help fight diabetes-related eye diseases with optical engineering expertise

Nikon to help fight diabetes-related eye diseases with optical engineering expertise

Nikon has announced it's teaming up with Verily, the company previously known as Google Life Sciences, to help improve the detection of diabetes-related eye diseases — diabetic retinopathy and macular edema, two of the leading causes of adult blindness. The camera giant will contribute its imaging technology to Verily's machine learning, with a goal of increasing early detection, giving patients enough time to get to a doctor before losing all eyesight.

Continue Reading

New medical ‘breathalyzer’ detects diseases via a patient’s breath

New medical ‘breathalyzer’ detects diseases via a patient’s breath

A new type of medical technology can detect 17 different diseases by ‘sniffing’ an afflicted patient’s breath, according to the American Chemical Society. The technology was inspired by the now-dated diagnoses method used by doctors before the advent of modern medical labs — sniffing a patient’s breath for signs of a particular disease. The technology is essentially a disease breathalyzer.

Continue Reading

Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy

Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy

Researchers from the University of Michigan have reported success in cancer research with mice using a new delivery method for therapies called nanodiscs. The researchers were able to use the nanodiscs to deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of colon and melanoma cancer tumors. Personalized immunotherapy is a growing field of research for cancer treatments.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next