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Breastfeeding linked to major long-term heart health benefits

Breastfeeding linked to major long-term heart health benefits

Breastfeeding may have long-term cardiovascular health benefits in mothers, particularly in cases where the breastfeeding took place over a longer period of time. The findings were revealed at the recent European Society of Endocrinology ECE 2019 event. According to the study, women who breastfed at some point in their lives had 'significantly lower' heart disease risk later in life, with that benefit amplified in women who breastfed over a longer duration.

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Study warns e-cigarette marketing has major impact on teen use

Study warns e-cigarette marketing has major impact on teen use

A new study out of Stanford University warns that promotional materials related to electronic cigarettes and other tobacco alternatives have a major impact on teenage nicotine use. The results come from Stanford Medicine, which tracked 757 teenagers in California over the course of a full year. Based on the data, the researchers found that teenagers exposed to related marketing were more than twice as likely to start using non-tobacco nicotine products.

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Landmark study links ultra-processed food with overeating, weight gain

Landmark study links ultra-processed food with overeating, weight gain

In what has been called the first study of its kind, researchers have found that consuming 'ultra-processed' foods results in overeating and, as a consequence, weight gain. The findings result from a small trial conducted by the NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK); they build upon past research that found a link between highly processed diets and health issues.

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You may be genetically hardwired to love dogs

You may be genetically hardwired to love dogs

Genetics may explain why some people are self-avowed dog lovers, according to a new study. The research found that dog ownership has a heritable component, meaning a person's genetic makeup may heavily influence whether they choose to own a dog. Uppsala University researchers behind the study describe the genetic influence as both 'significant' and surprising.

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Newly developed addiction-free pain reliever targets inflammation

Newly developed addiction-free pain reliever targets inflammation

Researchers with the University of Virginia have detailed the discovery of a potential new pain reliever that shows promise for offering relief without the addiction potential of existing opioid pain medication. According to a newly published study, the pain relief involves diacylglycerol lipase-beta (DAGL?) inhibitors that show anti-inflammation and pain relieving potential without the negative side effects.

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Crossword and number puzzles really do help keep old brains sharp

Crossword and number puzzles really do help keep old brains sharp

The regular completion of crossword puzzles, a common activity among older adults who hope to retain their cognitive abilities, has been linked to the maintenance of sharper brain function later in life, according to a new study. This is the largest online study related to the potential cognitive benefits of crossword and number-based puzzles, according to an announcement by the University of Exeter.

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Fast walkers may live longer regardless of body weight

Fast walkers may live longer regardless of body weight

A recent study found that people who walk at faster paces may live longer than people who walk slower. The data was self-reported by nearly 475,000 people in the UK, revealing that this increased physical activity's longevity benefit persisted despite the person's body weight. The findings underscore the importance of getting adequate levels of physical activity.

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This smartphone app uses paper to ‘hear’ ear infections in kids

This smartphone app uses paper to ‘hear’ ear infections in kids

Researchers with the University of Washington have developed a new smartphone app that is used in conjunction with an ordinary paper funnel to 'hear' ear infections in children. The system specifically targets middle ear infections, which are very common in children and responsible for the majority of trips parents make to pediatricians.

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Popular weed killer glyphosate linked to liver disease in humans

Popular weed killer glyphosate linked to liver disease in humans

Exposure to controversial and commonly used herbicide glyphosate has been linked to the development of liver disease in humans, a new study has revealed. The ingredient was previously linked to liver disease in animals by past studies, and now the most recent research has found the same correlation with non-alcoholic cases of liver disease in humans. The findings arrive amid an uptick in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the US.

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Saturated fat, diet, and depression link: What you need to know

Saturated fat, diet, and depression link: What you need to know

New research sheds light on why obesity and depression may be so commonly associated, and it involves an aspect of one's diet that many people are encouraged to keep in check: saturated fat. This dietary element is known to increase cholesterol levels and has been linked to a number of health issues by many studies, the most recent of which indicates that saturated fat may be a factor linking depression and obesity.

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Fecal transplant trial is first step toward possible obesity treatment

Fecal transplant trial is first step toward possible obesity treatment

The results from the first randomized clinical trial on fecal transplants for obesity are in, paving the way for a potential future treatment that involves gut bacteria changes. The pilot study involved 22 obese participants who were otherwise healthy, half of whom received fecal transplants from slim donors. Researchers found gut bacteria changes in the recipients, but the effects on weight loss are murky.

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How many daily cups of coffee are safe? Study offers surprising answer

How many daily cups of coffee are safe? Study offers surprising answer

Coffee is often touted for its energizing effects, and it is widely consumed in some countries starting at relatively young ages. The array of polyphenols and other beneficial compounds found in coffee beans are the basis for many health claims associated with the beverage, but questions remain over how much is too much. Researchers with the University of South Australia have found that you're most likely drinking a safe amount of coffee daily, but a small number of people may need to cut back.

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