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New discovery sheds light on magnetic sensing in birds

New discovery sheds light on magnetic sensing in birds

Humans are only able to use five senses to perceive the world around us. In the animal world, many are also able to sense the magnetic field of the earth. Researchers have reported new findings on magnetic sensing in birds and recently presented their research. Scientists at the University of Oldenburg in Germany and Oxford in the UK have been gathering evidence that suggests the magnetic sensing of migratory birds like European robins is based on a specific light-sensitive protein in the eye.

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Newly developed condenser harvests water from humidity 24/7

Newly developed condenser harvests water from humidity 24/7

All around the world, people live in harsh arid climates or areas where there is very little clean and available drinking water. Researchers at ETH Zürich developed a condenser to be used in countries where water is in short supply. It's the first zero-energy solution that harvests water directly from the atmosphere throughout the entire 24-hour daily cycle.

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Study finds stress does give you gray hair, but there’s a way to reverse it

Study finds stress does give you gray hair, but there’s a way to reverse it

The public has long associated stress with the development of gray hairs, an observational link so common that it spawned phrases like, "You're giving me gray hair." A new study has confirmed that yes, indeed, experiencing too much stress may cause some of your hair to lose its youthful color -- but this isn't a permanent change and you can, with some relaxation, reverse the color loss.

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Cannabis and suicide issues linked in young users, but a big question remains

Cannabis and suicide issues linked in young users, but a big question remains

A new study has found a link between cannabis product use and issues related to suicide, including thinking about and attempting to commit suicide. The research focused specifically on young users below the age of 35, noting that though this link was found, the findings don't necessarily mean that cannabis use is the cause of the observed association.

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Amber-encased ant discovered with a new type of fungal parasite attached

Amber-encased ant discovered with a new type of fungal parasite attached

One of the best ways that scientists can discover small fossilized insects and plants is encased within amber. Amber can save the specimen just as it was the day it stepped into the gooey medium. A new research study has been published focusing on an interesting discovery of a fossilized ant with a new genus and species of fungal parasite growing out of it.

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Scientists create a more durable cement by incorporating nanoparticles

Scientists create a more durable cement by incorporating nanoparticles

Cement is one of the most commonly used construction materials in the entire world. It used to build everything from homes and offices to roads that we drive down every day. The challenge with cement is that despite its strength, it can be turned into a potholed mess by ice and snow, and it often requires significant amounts of money to maintain each year. In fact, it's estimated that each lane-mile of road in the US costs about $24,000 per year to maintain.

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Physicists report experimental evidence with the potential to transform multiple fields

Physicists report experimental evidence with the potential to transform multiple fields

Physicists have reported the first experimental evidence that explains the unusual electronic behavior behind the world's thinnest superconductor. The material team is investigating has multiple applications thanks to its ability to conduct electricity with extreme efficiency. The superconductor is extremely thin at only a single atomic layer thick.

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Mild homophobia paves way for long-term health issues in LGB people

Mild homophobia paves way for long-term health issues in LGB people

According to a new study from George Washington University, even mild homophobia can be enough to trigger changes in the body that may put some lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people at risk of long-term health issues like heart disease. The health issues may result from the increase in cortisol, blood pressure, and heart rate triggered by exposure to prejudice and discrimination.

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Gigantic meteorite impact in Ukraine dated to 65 million years ago

Gigantic meteorite impact in Ukraine dated to 65 million years ago

Everyone's familiar with the demise of the dinosaurs thanks to a massive asteroid that slammed into the earth, causing an extension of most species on the planet. What many may not know is another massive meteorite impacted the planet. That second impact happened about 65 million years ago in what is now Ukraine.

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Researchers say Thwaites Glacier may be more stable than expected

Researchers say Thwaites Glacier may be more stable than expected

Thwaites Glacier is one of the largest ice sheets globally, and in the past, researchers said that it was in imminent danger of a sudden collapse. However, it turns out those researchers may not have been correct. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan, the glacier may be more stable and in less danger of sudden collapse than previously predicted.

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Researchers say they’ve found the ideal strategy to pay off student loans

Researchers say they’ve found the ideal strategy to pay off student loans

When many people near college graduation, they begin to contemplate how they'll deal with the student loans they've racked up over the past few years. The burden -- which grows more substantial with every generation -- can result in stress and, if not managed properly, may throw one's life plans off track for several years. Mathematicians with the University of Colorado at Boulder may have a solution, explaining that they developed a mathematical model to explore the ideal repayment strategy.

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Physicists cooled a 10-kilogram object to a near quantum state

Physicists cooled a 10-kilogram object to a near quantum state

When you sit at your desk in the office or at home, you probably have several things sitting on your desktop surface that, to our eyes, appear to be standing still. However, researchers at MIT say if you could look at those seemingly stationary objects through a quantum lens, you would see that they're actually made up of moving vast quantities of particles that seem to vibrate. It's very difficult to bring the movement of objects to a standstill.

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