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Simple bathing routine ‘significantly’ improves sleep quality

Simple bathing routine ‘significantly’ improves sleep quality

Sleep plays a key role in both quality of life and long-term health, but many adults struggle with insomnia and poor sleep quality, suffering brain fog, exhaustion, and other issues as a result. Many sleep improvement studies revolve around avoiding coffee after noon and artificial blue light after dinner, but a new study offers a different, and quite simple, alternative: taking a long hot bath before bed.

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New tattoo ink is a mood ring for health problems

New tattoo ink is a mood ring for health problems

Humans have been getting tattoos since ancient days, but modern science is giving them a new purpose: health condition monitoring. Researchers have detailed a new type of permanent tattoo that changes color when certain health biomarkers in the body change, offering visual indicators that something is wrong and the patient needs to visit their doctor.

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Human test makes chimps watch TV together, chimps become friends

Human test makes chimps watch TV together, chimps become friends

A certain level of bonding occurs between human beings when they share an experience together. This might seem obvious - it should, if you've ever experienced anything significant in your life with a person who is now a good friend. The study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B showed how this bonding is deeply rooted in our evolutionary history - by making chimps watch TV.

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Social media, not video games, linked to increase in teen depression

Social media, not video games, linked to increase in teen depression

Researchers with CHU Sainte-Justine in Quebec have published a study shedding light on digital entertainment and how it may impact depression during one's teenage years. The results, which were recently published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, point toward social media and television as driving depression in teens, but the same outcome wasn't observed in association with another popular digital activity.

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Eating this inflammatory diet may double your cancer risk

Eating this inflammatory diet may double your cancer risk

Chronic inflammation has been linked to a number of potential long-term health issues, including autoimmune problems and the development of cancer. Diet plays an important role in inflammation response with foods like red meat and refined sugar being major pro-inflammatory sources in diets. A new study warns that eating an inflammatory diet doubles the risk of developing one of the most common cancers in the world.

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Dementia isn’t inevitable: Study finds which healthy habits offset risk

Dementia isn’t inevitable: Study finds which healthy habits offset risk

It's easy to fall into the trap of believing dementia and Alzheimer's disease are the inevitable outcome of growing old, but a new study says that isn't the case. Despite having a genetic risk for the diseases, a newly published study found that certain healthy habits offset the risk, indicating that how you live life has a huge influence on whether dementia will ultimately be a part of it.

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Calorie restriction ‘significantly’ improves health in thin adults

Calorie restriction ‘significantly’ improves health in thin adults

A study out of Duke Health has found that eliminating approximately 300 calories from one's daily diet has a significant protective effect on health. This beneficial effect was found in adults who were a healthy weight or who had 'a few pounds' to lose, according to the researchers, spurring an improvement in health markers like blood pressure and blood sugar that were already in the 'good' range.

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Green plants at home have surprising effect on junk food cravings

Green plants at home have surprising effect on junk food cravings

Exposure to greenery, such as a walk in the park or afternoon spent working in a garden, has been linked to multiple potential health benefits over the years, including reduced blood pressure. A new study out of the University of Plymouth has found another possible health benefit related to green plants: a reduction in cravings for junk food, alcohol and cigarettes.

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Cancer study has bad news for people who drink soda

Cancer study has bad news for people who drink soda

Sugar is one of the most common elements in the average Western diet -- it can be found in obviously sugary snacks, but also in products one wouldn't guess contain high amounts of sugar, such as certain breads and savory sauces. Sweet drinks are arguably the most common way many people consume large quantities of sugar, both juice and soda being two popular examples. A recently published study has bad news for consumers who regularly drink these sweetened beverages.

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Blue light exposure at night may sabotage your keto diet efforts

Blue light exposure at night may sabotage your keto diet efforts

Exposure to blue light at night may be sabotaging your weight loss and low carb dieting efforts, a new study has found. The research focused on rats that followed a diurnal schedule, meaning they were awake during the day and slept at night. When exposed to light from LEDs for an hour at night, the rats were found to have an increased sugar cravings and reduced glucose tolerance the next day.

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Quorn vegan protein may be better than milk for building muscle

Quorn vegan protein may be better than milk for building muscle

A meat substitute called Quorn was found to aid muscle building better than milk protein, according to a new study. The research looked at the product's meat-free 'mycoprotein' ingredient, which is sourced from a microfungus called Fusarium venenatum that grows in soil. According to scientists with the University of Exeter, this protein may be ideal for stimulating muscle growth after exercise.

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Study finds link between prostate cancer therapy and dementia risk

Study finds link between prostate cancer therapy and dementia risk

A study out of the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine has found a link between drugs commonly used to treat prostate cancer and an increased risk of developing dementia. The study looked at more than 150,000 men who had prostate cancer, 62,330 of whom started receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) within two years of being diagnosed.

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