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Daylight Saving Time change may have long-term health consequences

Daylight Saving Time change may have long-term health consequences

Every year, many area in North America, Europe, and select other regions observe Daylight Saving Time, the system of adjusting clocks forward and backward every year to adjust which parts of the day have the most daylight hours. The latest clock change happened over this past weekend, spurring the latest spat of conversations about this system and whether it is something that should continue in the future. Among the considerations are health consequences associated with this clock change.

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Studies find measles virus resets immune system to ‘baby-like’ state

Studies find measles virus resets immune system to ‘baby-like’ state

Two newly published studies have found that measles is a bigger deal than many people realize: it leaves them more susceptible to a variety of other health conditions. The issue is caused by eliminating many of the protective antibodies one develops over time, opening the door for illnesses caused by bacteria and viruses to which the patient was previously immune.

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Taking popular OTC pain killer during pregnancy linked to ADHD in kids

Taking popular OTC pain killer during pregnancy linked to ADHD in kids

Taking a popular over-the-counter pain reliever called acetaminophen during pregnancy may increase one's odds of having offspring with ADHD or autism, a new study has found. The researchers looked at the concentration of acetaminophen in umbilical cord plasma and compared it to the number of cases of kids who had ASD or ADHD, finding a 'significant' link between the two.

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Early retirement may have ‘significant’ impact on mental decline

Early retirement may have ‘significant’ impact on mental decline

Retiring early may improve your overall health by increasing the quality of your sleep and reducing how much you drink. Despite that, retiring early may ultimately play a 'significant role' in harming older adults' mental functions, paving the way for dementia in the elderly. This negative impact was found to apply to retirees regardless of the country they lived in.

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Lack of free time isn’t the reason most Americans fail to exercise

Lack of free time isn’t the reason most Americans fail to exercise

Though many people cite a lack of free time as the primary reason they struggle to exercise, a new study has found that trouble finding time to hit the gym isn't the real reason most people fail to get enough activity in their day. Researchers with RAND Corporation found that Americans average around five hours of free time daily, with women having slightly less free time than men. Despite this, many struggle to fit in exercise because, the study claims, they spend too much time staring at screens.

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Popular blood pressure meds may be least effective for some patients

Popular blood pressure meds may be least effective for some patients

Yale University has published the results of a massive study that found ACE inhibitors, the most popular type of blood pressure medication, may be less effective at protecting patients from heart conditions than thiazide and thiazide-like diuretics. The results applied to individuals seeking their initial treatment for "extremely high" blood pressure, according to the researchers.

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Study warns plant-based diets are risky without adequate variety

Study warns plant-based diets are risky without adequate variety

Plant-based diets are a big trend right now and for good reason. A growing body of research has found a number of health benefits associated with reducing or eliminating the consumption of animal products, including reduced inflammation and lower odds of developing certain serious health conditions. Plant-based diets aren't without risk, however, something recently detailed in a new study from Oregon Health & Science University.

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Study shows how a fly lands on a ceiling (with slo-mo video)

Study shows how a fly lands on a ceiling (with slo-mo video)

Today we're looking at how a fly lands upside-down - up on a ceiling - courtesy of a study published this week in the AAAS's Science Advances. Inverted landing is something a fly takes for granted - largely because, as it would appear in this study, most of this process takes place in a fraction of a second. The findings in this paper show an expanded understanding of the various biomechanical, sensory, and neural processes that take place when a fly attempts to land on a ceiling. This data could lead to fantastic future applications - let's take a look at why.

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Harmful fat found in some junk food linked to major dementia risk

Harmful fat found in some junk food linked to major dementia risk

Eating trans fats has been linked to a startling high increase in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, underscoring the importance of eliminating this ingredient from food products. The study comes from Kyushu University Hospital Fukuoka, where researchers tracked more than 1,600 older adults for a decade, finding that trans fats consumption was 'significantly associated' with developing dementia.

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High-salt diets can trigger major brain change linked to dementia

High-salt diets can trigger major brain change linked to dementia

Eating a diet that is high in salt isn't only bad for your blood pressure -- a new study out of Weill Cornell Medicine found that consuming large quantities of sodium may also trigger a change in the brain that paves the way for lowered cognitive performance and, over time, the development of dementia. The issue revolves around nitric oxide, a compound that plays an important role in keeping the brain's vascular system healthy.

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Blue light from phones and TVs may speed up aging in humans

Blue light from phones and TVs may speed up aging in humans

Even if it's not shining in your eyes, researchers with Oregon State University warn that the blue light from modern gadgets may speed up your rate of aging, ultimately decreasing lifespan. In addition to causing damage to the retina in the eye, the study found that blue light may also damage brain cells, at least in a common fruit fly typically used for these types of studies.

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Short-term vaping can trigger the inflammation that causes lung disease

Short-term vaping can trigger the inflammation that causes lung disease

A study out of The Ohio State University has found that even short-term vaping can trigger inflammation in adults who have never previously smoked. This is the first time researchers have found changes in the lungs associated with short-term vaping by 'never-smokers,' highlighting the potential health risks of electronic cigarettes and other vaping products.

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