safari

Apple Safari to have tracking protection that could break some sites

Apple Safari to have tracking protection that could break some sites

Web browsers, particularly Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, have lately taken stronger actions against unscrupulous, not to mention potentially illegal, tracking by websites and third parties. Curiously silent is one browser maker who has painted itself as the champion of privacy in the modern digital and tech world. Apple, however, was simply waiting for the right moment to announce its own new policy against the misuse of tracking and cookies. But while it might be the harshest and strictest policy among web browsers, it could also be one of those that breaks the Internet the most for users.

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Safari just made iOS 13 Google-friendly

Safari just made iOS 13 Google-friendly

In what might be the biggest Android user-aimed feature of the year, Apple just added Google Docs support to Safari. Safari is Apple's web browser for iOS, and it's just been delivered a slew of new features. For those users that've never taken the time to download the Google web browser Chrome, these features might seem new and amazing.

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iOS 12.2 to remove Safari’s ineffective Do Not Track feature

iOS 12.2 to remove Safari’s ineffective Do Not Track feature

One of the side effects of promoting yourself as a staunch privacy advocate is that all your actions in that regard will be heavily scrutinized. Apple is indeed facing such attention in light of a major Group FaceTime bug and Facebook's misuse of its enterprise creds, but even the little things are getting some time in the spotlight. Apple is making some changes to the iOS version of Safari and while this removal of the "Do Not Track" setting may sound antithetical at first, it ironically protects users even more.

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Safari on iOS 12.2 will put limits on motion sensor access for privacy

Safari on iOS 12.2 will put limits on motion sensor access for privacy

It has been a little over a week since Apple rolled out the first beta for iOS 12.2 and the upcoming release of the mobile platform is already proving to be a treasure trove of features. But while most of the ones that have surfaced focus on what Apple is adding, a new “feature” that has come to light is talking about what Apple is somewhat taking away. While the iOS version of the Safari web browser will still let websites access data coming from the iPhone or iPad gyroscope and accelerometer, users will have to actually give the app permission to do so. Presuming, of course, they’re even aware it’s disabled by default.

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Safari stokes privacy war in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave

Safari stokes privacy war in iOS 12 and macOS Mojave

Apple is declaring a new war on tracking in Safari, ramping up its privacy features in the macOS Mojave and iOS 12 browser. The news follows last year's do-not-follow tracking system for cookies, which Apple promised would stop the same adverts from cropping up on every website you visit, just because you looked at a product on one site somewhere.

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Spotify web streaming no longer supports Apple’s Safari

Spotify web streaming no longer supports Apple’s Safari

While Spotify is most commonly associated with its mobile apps, it allows desktop users to stream music through their web browser. Unfortunately that's no longer an option for those who prefer Apple's Safari, as it is no longer supported by Spotify. The abrupt change came about this weekend, surprising and frustrating many users, with the streaming service stating that Safari is now incompatible with its Web Player.

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iOS 11 Safari will strip AMP markers when sharing links

iOS 11 Safari will strip AMP markers when sharing links

Google is often criticized for its business practices but most of the technology it develops are, more often than not, relatively accepted. Except, perhaps, for AMP. Short for Accelerated Mobile Pages, Google’s mobile-centric open standard for the web has, not so ironically, split the web. But while some platform creators aren’t exactly taking sides, it seems that Apple sneaked in a feature in iOS 11 that at least helps make AMP less intrusive. And that’s by simply stripping out AMP markers from URLs when sharing or copying links from the Safari mobile browser.

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Safari will block Flash by default in macOS Sierra

Safari will block Flash by default in macOS Sierra

Another one of the final nails has been hammered into the coffin of Adobe Flash. The latest version of Apple's Safari browser that will be included in the release of macOS Sierra has been revealed to block plugins like Flash and Java while users navigate the internet. As the newest version of Apple's desktop OS, mac OS Sierra — revealed at WWDC this week — and Safari 10 will instead default to HTML5 whenever it's available.

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Apple releases Safari Technology Preview for developers

Apple releases Safari Technology Preview for developers

Apple has launched its new Safari Technology Preview browser for developers, giving them the chance to test drive “incoming web technologies” like visual effects and new layouts before they’re released for everyone. Safari Technology Preview is available to download now (it requires the latest versions of El Capitan on desktop), and comes with some advantages over the WebKit Nightly, including support for iCloud, updates every two weeks in the App Store, and being validated/signed by Apple.

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Safari crashes when you tap the address bar, here’s how to fix it

Safari crashes when you tap the address bar, here’s how to fix it

We know that it can take just one malicious link to crash Safari. But someone has to trick you into actually clicking on it, in order for your browser to stop working. Unfortunately, it seems that now you don't even need to go anywhere for Safari to experience a crash.

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Careful what you click: “Crash Safari” webpage will do just that

Careful what you click: “Crash Safari” webpage will do just that

In May 2015, word surfaced that a specific text message could cause an iPhone to crash, leading no doubt to endless annoying pranks between friends. Now there’s something similar floating around, and it comes in the form of a link — visit the URL with Safari, and it will eventually make the browser crash. It works on Macs and mobile devices.

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iOS 9 deep-linking blurs line between apps and web

iOS 9 deep-linking blurs line between apps and web

Deep-linking in apps may not sound exciting, but it could change the way you use apps on your iPhone and iPad with iOS 9, not to mention give developers more control. The changes will allow users to jump from app to app more naturally, as well as blurring the division between local apps and web-based content, not to mention reduce the amount of time you spend punching in login credentials. Meanwhile, content within apps can show up within iOS 9’s newly-supercharged search.

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