nanotechnology

Scientists use AI to design self-replicating xenobots from frog cells

Scientists use AI to design self-replicating xenobots from frog cells

Last year, a team of scientists announced the development of "living robots," a new type of organism made using cells harvested from frog embryos. That same team is back with an update on these "robots," which they call xenobots, detailing a new scientific milestone: the ability to self replicate using existing cells.

Continue Reading

Microneedle patch with nanoparticles reverses balding in new study

Microneedle patch with nanoparticles reverses balding in new study

A new study published by the American Chemical Society details promising research for reversing baldness using nanoparticles. The medical technology, which utilizes microneedles as the delivery mechanism, addresses androgenic alopecia, the most common cause of male-pattern and female-pattern baldness.

Continue Reading

New conductive ink for ballpoint pens can write circuits on virtually any surface

New conductive ink for ballpoint pens can write circuits on virtually any surface

Conductive ink has been around for a while and is a tool for printing flexible electronic circuits on various surfaces. One challenge with current conductive ink is that the ink can be expensive and is incompatible with some materials. Another challenge is that the conductive inks also tend to clog up the devices used to apply them. Researchers have created a new conductive ink that can be used on virtually any surface that is applied with a clog-free ballpoint pen.

Continue Reading

Japanese researchers design linear nanomotors controlled using light

Japanese researchers design linear nanomotors controlled using light

Researchers from the Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, have designed linear nanomotors that can move in controlled directions using light. Researchers say that the work opens the door for new microfluidics, including lab-on-a-chip systems with optically actuated pumps and valves. The researchers point out that powering and controlling a motor smaller than a single bacterium precisely is very difficult.

Continue Reading

Samsung develops new tech that could double Li-on battery life

Samsung develops new tech that could double Li-on battery life

As our smart-devices become capable of doing more, it usually means that battery life takes a back seat, especially as smart-devices keep shrinking. Samsung researchers have developed a new method of constructing lithium-ion batteries that tackles the issue of extending battery life on a nanoscale. The use of silicon in lithium-ion batteries is a widely researched development, but a caveat to using silicon as an active material in Li-On batteries is that its volume drastically changes through charge-discharge cycles. This can lead to weakening the battery's life cycle energy density.

Continue Reading

Scientists close in on a single-molecule diode

Scientists close in on a single-molecule diode

Researchers at Columbia University School of Engineering have developed a technique creating working diodes that consist of only a single molecule. These molecular diodes are capable of performing 50 times better than previous incarnations of nanoscale diodes. The research group, led by associate professor of applied physics, Latha Venkataraman, could be the first single-molecule diode that is efficient enough to have real-world applications, like incorporation into other nanoscale devices. The new discovery is detailed in the article published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Continue Reading

Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Soon it may be possible to prevent heart attacks by an injection of nano-particles into the bloodstream, according to the newest research paper from the scientists at Columbia University Medical Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America. A large part of that is atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. This occurs as plaques build up along the inside of the arterial wall. The research team created targeted nano-particles designed to heal atherosclerosis. This is the latest discovery in a growing field of pint-sized medical discoveries. We've seen robots that can swim inside your eyeball and smart pills, but nothing as small as this nano-treatment.

Continue Reading

Lasers and carbon-nanotubes pave way to live brain scanning

Lasers and carbon-nanotubes pave way to live brain scanning

Lasers and carbon nanotubes peering into the brain might sound like the stuff of science fiction, but tests that could one day mean precise non-invasive diagnosis of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other diseases are already underway. The technology, developed by chemists at Stanford University, has so far been tested on mice, but opens the door to an alternative to physically removing sections of the skull to track cellular-level changes.

Continue Reading

This self-cleaning car tech could change everything

This self-cleaning car tech could change everything

Rich chocolate syrup on a pure white car would usually be the trigger for a trip to the detailing shop, but this time around there's something different: like the black oil from the X-Files, the syrup beads up and oozes off the edge of the hood, leaving no trace that it was ever there. Nissan's calling it "the World's Cleanest Car," but there's more to this special Leaf EV than a fetching matte paint-job.

Continue Reading

DARPA Z-Man project shows how man can climb like geckos

DARPA Z-Man project shows how man can climb like geckos

If imitation is the best form of flattery, then geckos should feel honored. Taking inspiration from what it claims are the world's best climbers, DARPA's Z-Man project demonstrated how a human of rather heavy constitution can scale up a vertical wall using nothing other than a pair of paddles.

Continue Reading

Nanomotor fits in a single cell, hits 18k RPMs

Nanomotor fits in a single cell, hits 18k RPMs

Nanotechnology is a fascinating field, one that holds a lot of promise and more than a few intriguing developments. One of the latest comes from engineers at the University of Texas at Austin who developed the fastest and smallest nanomotor in the world.

Continue Reading

Scientists create hemihelix that could lead to breakthroughs in nanodevices

Scientists create hemihelix that could lead to breakthroughs in nanodevices

Researchers from Harvard University have made an interesting discovery while working on another project. The team of researchers set out to fabricate new springs to support an imaging project inspired by a cephalopod. What they ended up doing was creating a shape rarely seen in nature called the hemihelix.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4