Chrome

Chinese Redcore browser built on Google Chrome, CEO admits

Chinese Redcore browser built on Google Chrome, CEO admits

Google may be under fire again for allegedly working with the Chinese government to create a censored version of its Search engine but it doesn’t actually have to lift a finger for its technology to be used for that same purpose. A new web browser named Redcore has grabbed the spotlight in China for claiming to have developed a browser that has “broken the American monopoly”. Except that now its CEO is admitting that it did, after all, build it using Chrome, an American company technology.

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Google Chrome arrives on Daydream VR for virtual web browsing

Google Chrome arrives on Daydream VR for virtual web browsing

Google is bringing its Chrome Internet browser to the Daydream VR platform, the company has announced. The web browser will be available for both the Daydream View and Lenovo Mirage Solo with Daydream VR headsets, enabling users to directly access the Internet using Google's own browser. Once installed, the user can launch Chrome directly from the VR platform's home screen.

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Chrome just dropped a bomb on unencrypted websites

Chrome just dropped a bomb on unencrypted websites

Google's Chrome browser has flipped its security strategy today, no longer rewarding encrypted sites with a "Secure" label but instead flagging unencrypted ones to warn users. For the past two years, Chrome has highlighted which sites use encryption for personal data with a legend in the address bar.

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Report: Fuchsia replacing Android is still Google’s plan

Report: Fuchsia replacing Android is still Google’s plan

A report released today revealed new inner workings of one of Google's not-so-public projects: Fuchsia. This software development project is available for public viewing in SOME sense, and has been for some time, but the way Google's using it remains largely a mystery. Today we're to understand that Fuchsia's reaching a crossroads, and that Google will soon need to decide whether to hang on and bust through, or drop the project altogether.

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Chrome is about to start eating more RAM, and we have Spectre to thank

Chrome is about to start eating more RAM, and we have Spectre to thank

While Chrome is a pretty solid browser, it's known for its tendency to be a bit of a resource hog. Its well-known appetite for all the RAM you've got is about to get worse, and we've all got Spectre to thank for it. The good news, however, is that this increase in RAM usage comes along with a new feature that should help keep Chrome users safe from Spectre's rather scary threats while browsing the web.

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The new best web browser for Android

The new best web browser for Android

Today we're having a peek at Kiwi, a web browser based on Chromium, but made to be a whole lot better than Chrome. This web browser is for Android only - for now - and it's got features the likes of which most users will likely be glad to utilize. One of these features is a full-fledged dark mode, made for easy access and non-intrusive deployment.

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Chrome will block installing extensions outside its Web Store

Chrome will block installing extensions outside its Web Store

Once upon a time, OK not so long ago, browsers such as Chrome and Firefox fought for supremacy over browser extensions. That war has seemingly simmered down but the remnants threaten the security of at least one of them. Chrome browser extensions have, unfortunately, been one of the major sources of malware for its users. Now Google is stepping in and will tighten security by soon preventing extensions from being installed from outside its own Chrome Web Store.

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Adobe fix: If you’ve got Flash, you’ve got a problem

Adobe fix: If you’ve got Flash, you’ve got a problem

Today the folks behind Adobe software safety revealed a fix for a flaw for Flash. You might not use Flash actively - you might not even realize it's on your computer (desktop computer, that is,) but there it might very well be. Good news for Apple computer users is this bit of malware seems to be relegated to Windows. Maybe. Very likely, but not certainly.

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HP Chromebox G2 mini desktops with USB-C are now available

HP Chromebox G2 mini desktops with USB-C are now available

The HP Chromebox G2 mini desktop announced in January is now available to purchase. HP added the device to its online store today, where it promptly sold out in certain configurations. The device, like most Chromebox models, resembles a set-top box, but packs Google's Chrome OS as an alternative to Chromebook laptops.

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Chrome, Firefox has been leaking Facebook profiles, names since 2016

Chrome, Firefox has been leaking Facebook profiles, names since 2016

Facebook just can't seem to catch a break and has become everyone's favorite scapegoat for privacy problems. Sometimes, however, it's not exactly Facebook's fault. Case in point is a recently reported and, fortunately, fixed vulnerability that allowed malicious third-party sites to glean Facebook information like a user's profile picture and name. And that vulnerability, ironically comes from a standard Web feature that was introduced way back in 2016.

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Chrome 67 prepares to kill passwords

Chrome 67 prepares to kill passwords

Once the only way to protect accounts, be they online or offline, passwords are now seen more as a liability than an ally. Everyone's out to kill it, from Apple to Microsoft to, now, Google. The rollout of the Chrome browser version 67 went almost under the radar. That, however, belies what's inside this feature packed release, which includes the beginning of the end for weak passwords using WebAuthn and something like a secure USB key or even your fingerprint.

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Chrome’s Secure site flag is retiring this September

Chrome’s Secure site flag is retiring this September

Google plans to change how it flags secure sites in Chrome, retiring its "Secure" indicator in favor of highlighting which pages don't support HTTPS. The decision, which will take affect in a later release of Chrome, flips the current system on its head.

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