Software

Microsoft Edge comes to macOS via Chromium-based preview

Microsoft Edge comes to macOS via Chromium-based preview

Some Microsoft faithful might feel that Microsoft lost an edge when it gave up on its homegrown web rendering engine but the benefits of basing Microsoft Edge on Chromium could make up for what little was lost. In addition to less development effort on the engine itself and support for a larger number of Chrome extensions, Microsoft Edge also gets support for platforms outside of Windows 10. One of those is macOS and now, Mac owners and developers can get a taste of what this new Edge has to offer, if they're willing to put up with a work in progress.

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Korean government is moving from Windows to Linux

Korean government is moving from Windows to Linux

Microsoft Windows is the most used operating system in the world, at least when talking about desktop and laptop computers. In addition to the usual consumer and enterprise customers, it is also used in government offices and computers. That may have been the status quo but more and more governments are looking to other solutions for one reason or another. The latest to start that journey is South Korea, whose government is planning to migrate its computers to the open source operating system Linux.

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Google Jump will end next month: What you need to know

Google Jump will end next month: What you need to know

Google has announced plans to shutter its Jump video stitching software platform in June, stating that the rise of alternative solutions has resulted in a decrease in users. Customers have been given a few weeks to transition from the service to a different option -- the service end will apply to both past and present users and include the loss of any data that is not backed up by the end of June.

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Install Windows on a Chromebook in 2019: Campfire dead, what still works?

Install Windows on a Chromebook in 2019: Campfire dead, what still works?

Early indications on Google developer code commits suggest that the early Project Campfire dual-boot solution are dead. They'll be winding down the program immediately. Now it's time to speak about what we'll be able to run instead. We begin with one very helpful sort of keyword: Chrulrabook.

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Intel chip flaw allowed hackers to watch you browse the web

Intel chip flaw allowed hackers to watch you browse the web

There's a flaw in the vast majority of Intel chips from here back to the year 2011 called ZombieLoad. That's what security researchers are calling it, anyway. The name refers to data a processor cannot handle, a "zombie load" which can be exploited thanks to a code vulnerability in Intel hardware.

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Adobe Creative Cloud is turning into a big legal mess

Adobe Creative Cloud is turning into a big legal mess

The cloud is supposed to be a big win-win for all parties involved. Consumers always have access to the latest and supposedly most bug-free version of software while service and software providers are assured of a steady stream of revenue to further develop their product. Reality, however, is sometimes harsher and always stranger than fiction and now subscribers to Adobe's Create Cloud Suite are finding themselves the subject of potential legal threats from third-parties suing Adobe itself.

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Fuchsia OS gets its biggest public confirmation from a Google exec

Fuchsia OS gets its biggest public confirmation from a Google exec

Fuchsia isn't exactly a total secret. It has been spotted numerous times, partially thanks to its open source nature. But while Google hasn't taken pains to hide this third operating system, it also hasn't said much about it. Perhaps for the first time in a long while and in the biggest way possible, Fuchsia's existence and goal has been confirmed by a high-ranking Google official. And not just any Google exec but the very man who heads Android and Chrome OS, the two platforms Fuchsia is expected to unify or replace.

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Meet Mainline, Google’s most important Android update, ever

Meet Mainline, Google’s most important Android update, ever

The security of the software that runs on your smartphone is the most important element in the device. Without a fully updated and secure smartphone, all could potentially be lost, or worse. This week Google made it clear that they intend to take hold of Android security at the root. This initiative goes by the name of Project Mainline.

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Chrome will allow blocking third-party tracking, show more ad info

Chrome will allow blocking third-party tracking, show more ad info

The pervading theme in Google I/O 2019 seems to be privacy. Ironic considering the company was, at one point, regarded to be its biggest violator. Whether you believe it turned over a new leaf or is cooking up something is for you to decide. The fact is that, at least for the moment, Google is giving users, especially Chrome users, more control or at least more information about the things that could violate their privacy on the Web.

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Fitter, happier, more productive: 3 ways Microsoft is fighting digital overload

Fitter, happier, more productive: 3 ways Microsoft is fighting digital overload

Less stress, more focus. Sitting in front of a computer - or pulling out your smartphone to check a notification - is rarely a route to low blood pressure, but Microsoft is previewing three ways artificial intelligence and software improvements could address digital health and boost efficiency at Build 2019 today.

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Microsoft Edge gets IE mode tabs and better security control

Microsoft Edge gets IE mode tabs and better security control

Microsoft promised big things when it announced Edge would be moving to the Chromium engine, and at Build 2019 it's delivering on that. The company's annual developer event has seen new privacy and usability tools added to Edge, including the ability to bring legacy web-apps into an Edge tab.

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Windows 10 1903 to let users decide when to download and install updates

Windows 10 1903 to let users decide when to download and install updates

One of the most controversial aspects of Windows 10, aside from initial concerns about privacy settings. is the way Microsoft pushed updates down everyone's throats. It went to the opposite extreme of previous Windows update strategies and forced its rolling updates on users that would later prove to be buggy and problematic. It has slowly been giving back control to users and the upcoming May 2019 update will let users decide when they want to download and install the updates.

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