security

Punycode phishing attacks exploit Unicode’s strength

Punycode phishing attacks exploit Unicode’s strength

In the past, it was easy to detect a fake website address designed to scam unsuspecting users. At least if you have a keen eye and a cautious mind. Now, however, it has just gotten harder to detect such phishing attacks with just your eyes. To make matters worse, even browsers are no help at all. These "homograph" phishing URLs, for all intents and purposes, looks exactly like a regular, safe URL. Except they arent't. And, unfortunately, they are taking advantage of the fact that computers these days can display more languages and characters than you might even be aware of.\

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The Galaxy S8 gives one great Note 7 feature a second chance

The Galaxy S8 gives one great Note 7 feature a second chance

The Note 7 may be dead - or, at least, as good as dead - but its legacy carries on in some small but highly useful ways in the Galaxy S8. Samsung's new flagship smartphone for 2017 has been getting consistently positive reviews around the internet this week - from myself included - though early users still have a couple of criticisms. One of those sent me out looking for a feature I'd almost forgotten about on the last Note, what with the whole battery distraction.

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Microsoft confirms Windows’ NSA hacking loopholes have been patched

Microsoft confirms Windows’ NSA hacking loopholes have been patched

Yesterday, the computer security industry woke up to the news that a hacker group known as "Shadow Brokers" had released a handful of exploits for Windows operating systems, along with details about how these tools had been created by and stolen from the NSA. While alarms are ringing about the US government's ability to hack consumer PCs, Microsoft has fortunately come forward to clarify that Windows has already been patched to prevent use of these exploits.

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Dallas hack sets of 156 warning sirens for 90 minutes

Dallas hack sets of 156 warning sirens for 90 minutes

Some computer hacking incidents are frightening, like those that play with your personal information. Some seem like playful, but still illegal, antics of children. Then there are those in the middle, bordering on being a nuisance, but with potentially disastrous results. Such was the situation the residents of Dallas found themselves in when, in the dead of night, the city's 156 emergency sirens blared loudly for 90 minutes, causing not just a ruckus but a growing distrust of the warning system.

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Malware makes users play game for high score instead of paying ransom

Malware makes users play game for high score instead of paying ransom

These days, it's no surprise when a new type of malware turns up to exploit and abuse users, but a recently discovered variant of ransomware is something else entirely. Instead of holding someone's files for ransom until a payment is made to hackers, "Rensenware" requires that users play a punishing video game and reach a high score in order to get their data back.

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GameStop looking into reports of security breach

GameStop looking into reports of security breach

We're hearing some news that's potentially bad for anyone who has shopped on GameStop.com in the past few months. GameStop said today that it's investigating reports of a security breach on its website, but hasn't really delved into many details concerning what such a breach would entail.

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Researchers find 1,800 big patient data breaches at hospitals

Researchers find 1,800 big patient data breaches at hospitals

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine reveals that many hospitals aren't adequately protecting their patients' data, leaving many vulnerable to identity theft and more. Researchers found almost 1,800 'large data breaches' involving patient information spread over a time frame of seven years. The medical facilities where the data breaches were discovered span many states ranging from Michigan's Henry Ford Hospital to California's UC Davis Medical Center.

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New bill aims to stop warrantless gadget searches at the border

New bill aims to stop warrantless gadget searches at the border

Warrantless laptop and phone searches at the border are a problem, and a new bill aims to stop them. The bipartisan bill is designed to protect the devices of Americans who are passing through the US border, and would require border patrol agents to get a proper warrant before searching the devices. The bill was introduced earlier today by a handful of Republican and Democrat politicians from the House and the Senate.

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Samsung Tizen has 40 zero-day vulnerabilities, researcher warns

Samsung Tizen has 40 zero-day vulnerabilities, researcher warns

Samsung is increasingly using its Tizen platform on its connect devices, such as smart TVs, but that may not be a good thing from a security standpoint. According to Israeli researcher Amihai Neiderman, Tizen is a poorly created product with 40 previously unknown security vulnerabilities, ones that could allow hackers to relatively easily gain access to the connected devices and to take control of them. He goes so far as to say, "It may be the worse code I've ever seen."

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Samsung Galaxy S8 facial recognition security is easily fooled

Samsung Galaxy S8 facial recognition security is easily fooled

If you're planning to pick up the Galaxy S8 and use facial recognition to secure the handset, think again. A new demonstration of the feature shows it being easily fooled using a photo of the handset's owner, and coinciding with the revelation is word from sources that Samsung allegedly considers the feature as just 'for fun.' The phone also offers fingerprint and iris scanning security.

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Congress votes away Internet privacy regulations in favor of ISPs

Congress votes away Internet privacy regulations in favor of ISPs

Following the Senate's lead, the House has just voted to end Internet privacy regulations that would have required Internet service providers to get permission before selling a customer's Internet data. The resolution will go into effect if Trump signs it; following the vote, the White House issued a statement saying the president's advisors will recommend doing so.

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Now Google Home can control your August Smart Lock

Now Google Home can control your August Smart Lock

August's Smart Lock has added Google Home support, allowing users to ask the Google Assistant to lock their doors. The functionality which rolls out from today, builds on the smart speaker's growing range of Internet of Things abilities, which already include controlling lights among other things. However, in the name of security, August isn't granting full key-holder privileges to the Google Assistant quite yet.

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