law

Gaming addiction in China leads to heavy curfew for minors

Gaming addiction in China leads to heavy curfew for minors

Gaming addiction, which the World Health Organization (WHO) recently categorized as a mental health disorder, is still a heavily debated topic in both psychological circles as well as governments. While some might not be quick to label it as a mental health issue, it's hard to deny that it is causing problems, especially for impressionable young people. Perhaps unsurprisingly, China is now reported to be imposing some very harsh restrictions when it comes to minors playing online games, a bit ironic considering the country's position in the gaming market.

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Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple antitrust probe: Why are they in trouble?

Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple antitrust probe: Why are they in trouble?

The Capitol's war on tech companies is heating up. The U.S.' biggest corporations - Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple - were all told to hand in information as part of an ongoing antitrust investigation. They're calling for greater transparency in their data collection practices – and to investigate the possibility of corrupt practices to cripple competition.

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DoorDash support phone down? This is just the beginning

DoorDash support phone down? This is just the beginning

Support phone numbers for DoorDash are down or slow-to-respond at the moment due to "issues" with the DoorDash "consumer platform." I say "this is just the beginning" in the title of this article because the ugly truth of DoorDash, its leadership, and its policies have been coming to a head for a while now, and with the legal head of the mess popping up earlier this week, now this, it's plain to see: Nastiness is about to go down.

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Why are e-cigarettes so problematic? A look into San Francisco’s decision to ban its sales

Why are e-cigarettes so problematic? A look into San Francisco’s decision to ban its sales

San Francisco has voted to ban the sale of electronic cigarettes, nicotine devices that have become extremely popular among teenagers. The move comes as a surprise as the city is home to Juul, the world’s largest manufacturer of the e-cigs. However growing fears of addiction among youth and the lack of research on the impact on our health has led to authorities taking a better-safe-than-sorry stance on the cigarette alternative.

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Reasons against regulating the internet – The Flip Side

Reasons against regulating the internet – The Flip Side

A couple of years ago, the cyber-sphere seemed to be split into two sides: one for internet regulation, and one for absolute freedom of its users. But in recent times, the threat of terrorism, abuse, exploitation and treason have made internet regulation a lot more appealing for nations that once stood by the values of freedom of expression.

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Cohen admits Trump’s early info on Russia-hacked DNC emails

Cohen admits Trump’s early info on Russia-hacked DNC emails

In a statement to Congress this morning, former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen released many relatively shocking accusations about a sitting President of the United States. The bit that's most important to our part in this story is the tech angle - that of the hacking of emails before the election of our President. The part we're talking about today includes Cohen admitting that Trump was "a presidential candidate who knew that Roger Stone was talking with Julian Assange about a WikiLeaks drop of Democratic National Committee emails."

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Is Verizon right to temp-lock their phones?

Is Verizon right to temp-lock their phones?

Temporary locks for all new phones released by Verizon will go into effect soon if OK'ed by the FCC. A message was released today publicly, but addressed toward the FCC, from Ronan Dunne, executive vice president and group president of Verizon Wireless. In this message, Dunne suggests that it is because of identity thieves that Verizon is requesting that the FCC allow them to lock phones to their network for 60 days after purchase.

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Qualcomm vs Apple suit brings iPhone back to Germany, sans Intel

Qualcomm vs Apple suit brings iPhone back to Germany, sans Intel

In one of several court battles around the world, Qualcomm's win against Apple resulted in some iPhones returning to sale where they'd been banned. This battle was fought in Germany, where the iPhone 7 and iPhone 8 were banned from sale temporarily pending the outcome of a court case. The versions that've returned to sale in Germany did so with a change unique to this country: They've created iPhones with only Qualcomm hardware inside where elsewhere in the world they're also using tech from Intel.

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Apple stores Russian user data on Russian servers but no need to panic

Apple stores Russian user data on Russian servers but no need to panic

Doing business in multiple countries is very tricky business. You have to be mindful of each countries' laws, which, of course, vary from country to country. That's especially true when it comes to data storage and retention, and sometimes even the biggest companies have no choice but to comply. That's the situation Apple faced in Russia and a recent filing showed that it has conceded to the government's demands to store Russian users' data on servers hosted in Russia.

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Cisco, Apple call for US version of EU’s GDPR federal law

Cisco, Apple call for US version of EU’s GDPR federal law

Privacy in the technology industry, especially in software and computing, has somewhat become a joke in recent years. Some companies, like Facebook and Google, have been dragged into the spotlight and shamed for mishandling users’ private data. Naturally, all companies claim they are all for privacy but, it unsurprisingly, they don’t all agree on what that privacy means. That is why companies such as Cisco and Apple are calling on the federal government to come up with a national data privacy law and are pointing to the EU’s GDPR as the inspiration for such a regulation.

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US Huawei phone spying: Here’s the incentive

US Huawei phone spying: Here’s the incentive

Huawei's in a little bit of trouble right now with the United States justice department - today we're looking at how this affects the everyday consumer. The devices that've been on the market over the past few years and those on sale right now aren't likely a threat to you, the SlashGear reader, the smartphone user. If you're the sort of person who watches the news and gets concerned about businesses disobeying international trade laws - OR if you're using your Huawei phone with a T-Mobile USA sim card, you might need to take additional action.

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Public Domain Day opens floodgates and a few cans of worms

Public Domain Day opens floodgates and a few cans of worms

January 1, 2019 wasn’t just the start of a new year. It was also the start of a new period in the creative history of mankind. After a 20-year delay, copyrighted works from 1923 are now in public domain, with everyone free to adapt and remix them without fear of prosecution. A key moment in copyright and trademark history, these now pubic domain works could usher in a new corpus of literary, musical, and artistic works that could now go public rather than stay underground or in the dark corners of the Web. But it could also challenge existing laws that may have remained untouched since the 20s, causing a bit of chaos in the very same industry.

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