Internet

Advertising scripts using data from browser password managers to track users

Advertising scripts using data from browser password managers to track users

It's well-known that tools like password managers can help users improve their online security — by creating unique passwords for each website. However, researchers have found that advertising trackers are able to exploit data from the simplified password managers built into browsers like Chrome and Firefox (rather than standalone services like 1Password and LastPass) to continue tracking users browsing habits across the internet.

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Ancestry.com leaked data on 300,000 users

Ancestry.com leaked data on 300,000 users

The ancestry and family tree website Ancestry.com revealed last week that data on 300,000 users, including email addresses, usernames, and passwords, was publicly exposed on one of its servers. Tony Blackham, the company's Chief Information Security Officer, issued a statement shortly before the Christmas holiday noting that the user data was in a file publicly exposed on a server for RootsWeb, Ancestry.com's community-driven genealogy site.

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Facebook apologizes for inconsistent hate speech enforcement

Facebook apologizes for inconsistent hate speech enforcement

Facebook has apologized for its uneven enforcement involving hate speech, allowing some offensive content to remain while removing others. A recent report called attention to the discrepancy, showing some offensive posts that were allowed to remain while others were deleted. When asked to review 49 questionable content decisions, Facebook said that there were 22 instances in which its content reviewers made mistakes.

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Google Maps bans business reviews left by former employees

Google Maps bans business reviews left by former employees

Disgruntled former employees, those feeling wronged in one way or another, have a tendency to take out their frustration online. One may seek a sense of justice or revenge by lambasting their former place of employment online, and chief among those online review destinations is Google. The Internet giant has updated its Google Maps policy to ban that specific kind of review: the kind left for a business by a former worker.

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Internet Archive gets $1m Bitcoin donation from anonymous philanthropist

Internet Archive gets $1m Bitcoin donation from anonymous philanthropist

The Internet Archive has been gifted $1 million in bitcoins as a donation to help fund the organization. The donation was given by an unnamed philanthropist via the Pineapple Fund, which has given money in the form of bitcoin to a variety of charities. Internet Archive is now the 14th entity to receive bitcoin from the philanthropist, who states on their website that they're donating most of their coin to the greater good.

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North Korea airport adds WiFi, but with a big limitation

North Korea airport adds WiFi, but with a big limitation

North Korea has made the surprising decision to launch WiFi service at its main airport, marking a big change for the tiny nation. The introduction of a public WiFi network is surprising, but the related restrictions aren't: it isn't available to just anyone. The wireless Internet access is restricted to some international travelers, but a recent report of attempted use didn't end well.

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Putin web watch makes election-meddling playbook public

Putin web watch makes election-meddling playbook public

Russia President Vladimir Putin spoke this week on the dangers of election meddling via web-based social media. He did this after signing into law a means for Russian officials to label news organizations "foreign agents." Earlier this year Russia was accused of meddling in the 2016 US Presidential Election with social media and with other digital means.

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Library of Congress Twitter archive reduced to only important tweets

Library of Congress Twitter archive reduced to only important tweets

Following years of archiving every public tweet ever, the Library of Congress has reduced its Twitter archival goal: it will now only save tweets that it decides are important. That's not to say the archiving was a failure, because it wasn't; the Library of Congress is in possession of all public tweets spanning back 12 years. Going forward, though, the Library of Congress says it will only archive tweets on a "selective basis."

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Bitcoin price by next month: The BTC Breakdown

Bitcoin price by next month: The BTC Breakdown

Bitcoin prices are going up, and Bitcoin value is going up. Bitcoin value went down earlier this month, but at the start of this month it was more valuable than it ever was before. Bitcoin is not a stock - but it is traded in a way that's similar to how most people think a stock is traded. Bitcoin is like an exchange-traded fund, but it's not traded on any "major" exchange like a stock. Today we're going to give an estimate for how valuable Bitcoin will be by next month.

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OkCupid forcing people to use real names on their profile over usernames

OkCupid forcing people to use real names on their profile over usernames

Online dating service OkCupid has announced that it will be requiring users to start putting their real names on dating profiles, doing away with the pseudonyms and usernames that have been allowed for years. The company explains that the change in policy is in part to "keep up with the times" as well as to have profiles reflect a real person, and not a monicker like "pancake_king58." Unfortunately, a significant number of users are upset about the loss of privacy due to the change.

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Tricked by Russian 2016 election propaganda? New Facebook tool reveals all

Tricked by Russian 2016 election propaganda? New Facebook tool reveals all

Last month, Facebook revealed that it would soon launch a tool enabling its users to check whether they'd unwittingly "liked" a Russian 2016 election propaganda post. That tool has just gone live, giving every Facebook user the chance to check their own "liking" history. The tool follows a revelation made by Facebook in recent months: that Russia was using its social media platform to manipulate the US's most recent presidential election.

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Facebook drops disputed flag in war against fake news

Facebook drops disputed flag in war against fake news

Fake and misleading news is a real problem on Facebook. The social media giant has come under heavy criticism for its role in the spread of fake news, and earlier this year, it set out to fix the issue. Some of you may have encountered Facebook's solution over the past year - a disputed flag that accompanies false or misleading links shared on the platform.

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