Down, down, down: iPhone, iPad and Mac sales all dive in Q2 2016

Chris Burns - Apr 26, 2016, 3:49 pm CDT
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Down, down, down: iPhone, iPad and Mac sales all dive in Q2 2016

This afternoon Apple reported their financial Q2 2016 earnings report for investors, and with it, falling sales in devices of all sorts. It’s not as if this is the worst quarter Apple has ever had – far from it. Instead, it would appear that Apple’s device sales have reached a saturation point. Many consumers that would be buying an iPhone, iPad, or Mac have already got one. As such, even Apple’s astronomical sales numbers don’t seem as spectacular as they have in the past.

Apple’s iPhone sold 51.2 million units this quarter. That’s intense. Unfortunate for the public eye, that’s less than Apple sold this same quarter one year ago – by 16%, believe it or not. That’s “year-over-year” sales drop. Compared to this most recent quarter, Apple’s iPhone unit sales fell by 32%.

Apple sold 10.2 million iPads this quarter – that’s just 19% lower unit sales than they accomplished this same quarter one year ago. This is par for the course for Apple at this point with iPads, as it were – and only last quarter did it become apparent that Apple wouldn’t be driving iPhone sales up forever.

The Mac racked up 4 million units sold this quarter, that’s 12% lower than this same quarter last year.

Does any of this mean that Apple is doing poorly? Not so much. They’ve reached a point at which they’ll want to modify what they’re selling and how they’re selling it in the long run, but really – millions and millions of unit sales for devices that Apple only updates in small iterations year by year – that’s still an accomplishment that’s not to be scoffed at.

As I said back in January, Apple’s iPhone earnings “stall” was inevitable. Now we’ll see how the company aims to defend itself against those reporters and members of the public – and shareholders, more than likely – who would suggest that Apple’s headed for disaster. How silly.

VIA: Apple


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