This holiday season, Android Pay becomes charitable

JC Torres - Nov 24, 2015, 9:27pm CST
This holiday season, Android Pay becomes charitable

The holidays are coming, and for some, especially these next few days, that means lots of food and lots of shopping. But for some, it is also a season for giving and for giving back. Google wants to be identified with this latter group and so it is kicking off a new charity program that starts November 24th all the way until the end of the year. And Android Pay will play a major role in it too. Proceeds of this campaign will go to supporting the eduction of children with special needs.

The process is really simple and you won’t even have to do anything other than use Android Pay to purchase stuff. Every time you use Android Pay from today until December 31 this year, Google will be donating $1 to special needs eduction projects, up to $1 million if it reaches that. But Black Friday is always a special shopping day, so on that day, Google will instead donate $2 for every Android Pay purchase. So not only do you get the convenience of wirelessly payment, your conscience will also have a feast each time.

Google estimates that teachers for special needs spend about $500 annually out of their own pockets just to boost their classrooms with projects and activities to help these special children. That’s no small amount, especially considering how this line of work isn’t exactly the most lucrative. Google’s Global Impact Challenge: Disabilities campaign is trying to relieve some of that burden, ultimately helping improve the lives of people with disabilities.

Putting Android Pay to work this way might be a stroke of genius in roping people into using the services, especially during this season where shopping is at an all time high. The NFC-based payment system is accepted in millions of outlets across the country, claims Google. That said, this charity campaign is void for residents of Alabama, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Mississippi, and South Carolina, or any other state where such programs are prohibited.

SOURCE: Google


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