privacy

Encrypted ProtonMail opens service to public, mobile apps ready

Encrypted ProtonMail opens service to public, mobile apps ready

The fight between Apple and the Justice Department over the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone has once again put the spotlight on security, privacy, and encryption. The last time that was a hot topic was nearly 3 years ago at the height of the "Snowden Files". Born out of that very same controversy, Swiss encrypted email provider ProtonMail has seen it fit to finally open up its service to the general public, removing the invite-only barricade for individuals and groups to sign up for an end-to-end encrypted secure e-mail service.

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Man charged, pleads guilty in celebrity photo iCloud hacking case

Man charged, pleads guilty in celebrity photo iCloud hacking case

A Pennsylvania man has been formally charged in the hacking case that saw hundreds of private photos from celebrities stolen from their iCloud and other cloud storage accounts and posted online in the fall of 2014. The US Department of Justice says 36-year-old Ryan Collins is facing felony computer hacking charges after he broke into more than 50 iCloud accounts and 72 Gmail accounts. He has agreed to plead guilty, and is expected serve at least 18 months in prison.

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Google webpage encryption made transparent

Google webpage encryption made transparent

This week Google has opened up a new section in their ever-changing, ever-updating Transparency Report for the public. In this new section, google delivers encryption for the masses. Not that they hadn't been moving toward encryption and data security in all things public before - now it's just that they're making more of an effort to show you, the user, how they're doing in their move to HTTPS. This new Transparency Report section is called - appropriately enough - HTTPS at Google.

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Apple FBI case simplified by John Oliver Encryption video

Apple FBI case simplified by John Oliver Encryption video

If you weren't already convinced one way or the other about the Apple FBI encryption case, today "Last Week Tonight" will do that job for you. John Oliver tackles encryption, showing how the situation has played out so far and how absurd everything has been. In this Last Week Tonight, like all Last Week Tonight episodes, Oliver not only takes the case and makes it all simple enough for any person to understand, he drops the mic at the end as well.

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What the new FCC Internet Privacy rules mean for you

What the new FCC Internet Privacy rules mean for you

On March 10th, 2016, the FCC proposed a set of broadband rules for consumer privacy across the United States. What we're looking at here is what might be - not what is just yet. What you'll find is that FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is proposing is that "when consumers sign up for internet service, they shouldn't have to sign away their right to privacy." Novel concept, yes?

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Amazon Fire tablet encryption to return as retailer backtracks

Amazon Fire tablet encryption to return as retailer backtracks

Amazon has backtracked on Fire tablet encryption, having triggered an outpouring of criticism after removing support in the latest Fire OS 5 release. The retail giant blamed minimal customer interest for the decision, which saw Android's data encryption option stripped from the Fire tablet platform, though communications with Amazon's own servers were still secured.

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Google “Right to be Forgotten” changes further muddy privacy

Google “Right to be Forgotten” changes further muddy privacy

Google is changing the way it handles "Right to be Forgotten" requests, taking into account location in a further attempt to appease European privacy regulators. Although the search company - among others offering search engine services in Europe - has been delisting select entries from its search results since May 2014, the way in which that process is handled is now getting tweaked.

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Amazon: Fire owners didn’t care about encryption

Amazon: Fire owners didn’t care about encryption

Amazon has pushed back at suggestions it's selling out Fire tablet users on data encryption, arguing that it was a Spring clean not a security lapse. The online behemoth faced vocal criticism this week over its Fire OS 5 software for its affordable Android-based tablets, which quietly removed support for encrypting data.

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What is a Cyber Pathogen? An FBI invention to defeat Apple

What is a Cyber Pathogen? An FBI invention to defeat Apple

This week the FBI has pulled out all the stops when it comes to getting Apple to unlock their iPhones for court cases. They've invented a term. The term is "Cyber Pathogen." That's not a real thing. They've invented a new term to describe something that cannot possibly be inside the iPhone to convince the government that they absolutely NEED to gain access. It's one hundred percent absurd, for real.

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Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Today we're rounding up all the details regarding Apple's legal battle with the FBI over iPhone encryption. This includes the one-sentence filing made by attorneys representing Apple this week notifying the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California that their clients "formally object" to an order to break in to an encrypted iPhone. Today we make it simple. Today we catch you up at the same time as we collect the data in one place for ourselves, as well.

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Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

This afternoon the FBI and Apple spoke before a congressional panel regarding iPhone encryption. This case has to do with unlocking a singe iPhone, says the FBI, one owned by a San Bernardino shooter. After a New York Magistrate Judge (James Orenstein) ruled against the FBI on compelling Apple to unlock this iPhone, the FBI and Apple went to congress to continue to speak on the issue. Apple's arguments have been straightforward. The FBI's arguments have stacked with fear mongering statements aplenty.

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NY Judge rules against DEA in Apple iPhone encryption case

NY Judge rules against DEA in Apple iPhone encryption case

One ruling is released in Apple's battle with the government over given access to encrypted iPhones in court cases throughout the United States. As we pour over what Magistrate Judge James Orenstein's 50-page memorandum and order means for Apple, we can also fairly easily interpret what it'll mean for all smart devices, including those running Google's Android. And Windows Phone. And Blackberry, if you wish. The whole lot.

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