privacy

Signal Foundation: WhatsApp co-founder makes private chat a nonprofit

Signal Foundation: WhatsApp co-founder makes private chat a nonprofit

A nonprofit organization was just revealed, made by the folks at Signal (the chat platform and app) and co-founder of WhatsApp, Brian Acton. This nonprofit organization was "made possible" by Brian Acton and aims to "support, accelerate, and broaden Signal’s mission of making private communication accessible and ubiquitous." In short, it'll turn Signal into an organization into which funds can flow for the betterment of Signal, a truly private form of communication.

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Android P camera requirements could be a double-edged sword

Android P camera requirements could be a double-edged sword

As an open platform, Android gives developers and users a lot of wiggle room to do things that some like iOS would never allow them to. Sometimes, that delivers power and functionality that only Android users are able to enjoy. But like any sort of power, it can and has been abused. A recurring theme in the upcoming Android P seems to revolve around fine-tuning control over certain aspects of the operating system. The latest is a new limitation that prevents idle background apps from using the camera, which is a win for privacy but potentially for theft as well.

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Flight Sim Labs’ DRM tool could collect Google Chrome passwords

Flight Sim Labs’ DRM tool could collect Google Chrome passwords

Piracy is a problem that has hounded the entertainment and software industry for decades and there doesn’t seem to be any light at the end of the tunnel yet. Different people have different opinions on how to cut or at least curb it and tools have come and gone with mixed effectiveness. One software maker, however, may have gone a bit too far in its quest stop a pirate. Popular slight sim maker Flight Sim Labs admitted to shipping an installer that included a tool that, under very specific circumstances, would collect a specific user’s passwords stored on Google Chrome and send them back to the company.

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If you trust Google now, Xively will be great

If you trust Google now, Xively will be great

Google announced their intention to acquire IoT platform Xively this week, aiming for a new layer of value in their connected future. If you trust Google, this announcement was a bit of good news. Xively may give Google the technology and knowhow to bring their fully connected smart home to life for millions of users around the world. It could be great.

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FedEx goof exposes 119,000 passports, IDs and more

FedEx goof exposes 119,000 passports, IDs and more

A huge FedEx security goof exposed more than 119,000 scanned documents, including passports and driving licenses of customers, the shipping company has admitted. Security researchers identified a server on which the scans - which had been collected as part of a discontinued service that assisted customers in setting up shipments - had been left unsecured and open to public access.

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Facebook two-factor authentication spams users via SMS

Facebook two-factor authentication spams users via SMS

Facebook just can't catch a break these days, which is probay nothing unexpected for being one of the world's biggest social networks. It is involved in one privacy issue after another, not to mention lawsuits springing from those. This latest could definitely be added to the latter if some law firm takes interest. Users are reporting they are receiving SMS notifications about Facebook posts without them agreeing to it. But more worryingly, Facebook seems to have used the phone number users have connected to the network's two-factor authentication system.

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Shuffle PrivateLine: putting robocalls on notice [#sponsored]

Shuffle PrivateLine: putting robocalls on notice [#sponsored]

If you thought the spam situation on the Internet and mobile devices is bad, you should get a load of what’s happening over ye ol’ telephone lines. Robocalls have been plaguing the country for months, years even, and there doesn’t seem to be any indication that the numbers are going down anytime soon. And that’s with advertised solutions already in place, some coming from carriers directly and others through third party vendors. Some of those used to very basic methods of identifying robocallers. Others even employ their own users to help build up their blacklist database, sometimes at the risk of users’ privacy. Clearly, there’s more than enough room for a better and, more importantly, smarter solution and Shuffle Ventures’ upcoming AI-powered PrivateLine might be the key to ending robocalls once and for all.

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The 3 HomePod settings you need to know

The 3 HomePod settings you need to know

Apple's HomePod has arrived, and while the super-simple setup process may make a great first impression, there are a few other settings and menus it's worth getting to grips with. The smart speaker offers voice-controlled access to not only your Apple Music account but potentially to messages and more on your iPhone, too. Some users are going to love that, but others may want to know the three key settings and menus they need to get master control over HomePod. Happily, we've got you covered.

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The Google Glass paranoia is coming true in China

The Google Glass paranoia is coming true in China

Chinese police are using a Google Glass-like wearable computer to spot criminals, with the notoriously intrusive authorities outfitting security teams with facial recognition tech. The headsets are being deployed among railway police in Zhengzhou, capital of China's Henan province. Each has a crowd-facing camera, and is linked with a police database.

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This Android app shared thousands of private photos and docs

This Android app shared thousands of private photos and docs

This morning one intrepid Android user discovered a bit of a security hole in an app called XGimp. This app had good intentions, to be sure - but there's was a bit of a mistake in its basic structure. The app allowed the user to edit a photo with a simple image editor locally, or, if they wanted, the app allowed an upload to a server with a Gimp image editor. Therein lies the rub.

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Strava fitness tracking app reveals location of military bases

Strava fitness tracking app reveals location of military bases

When Strava released its activity heatmap last year, it was quite proud of how many people have used the app to record their jogs and runs. It boasted of having 6 times more data, over a billion activities, and having the largest, richest, and most beautiful data set of its kind. Unfortunately, that is now landing it in a bit of a security controversy involving the world's most secretive organizations: military forces. Because in tracking users' routes and locations, Strava may have inadvertently also revealed the location of some of the army bases around the world, especially some secret ones from the US.

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OnePlus clipboard issue a false alarm

OnePlus clipboard issue a false alarm

Friday a report was released about a clipboard issue in OnePlus smartphones - today it's been fixed and clarified. The first report cites Elliot Anderson, whose known for digging up data in smartphone apps. His report was meant to be a first investigation, but was reported as a major privacy invasion - which we've been on alert for in OnePlus devices before. Turns out this situation wasn't anything to get too pumped up about.

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