environment

Study finds that it’s snowing microplastics in the Arctic

Study finds that it’s snowing microplastics in the Arctic

Microplastics, the tiny bits of plastic that cover everything from glitter to fibers rubbed off larger products, can be found mixed in snow in remote places that include the Arctic, according to a new study. Researchers found more than 10,000 microplastics per liter of snow in the Arctic, a surprising number that reveals even the most remote places on Earth aren't protected from humanity's plastics problem.

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Tesla Megapack large-scale batteries to power utility-size projects

Tesla Megapack large-scale batteries to power utility-size projects

Tesla may be best known for its electric cars but an important part of that equation is the battery. And for Tesla to truly become a credible proponent of eco-friendly transportation, it can't settle for just any batteries but has to make its own. Developing sustainable energy sources not just for its cars but for other projects has become just as important for Tesla as making EVs and it as just announced it biggest battery yet. With the Megapack, the company is aiming to help power up utility-scale projects quickly, efficiently, and environment-friendly.

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LEGO Treehouse’s plant bricks are all plant-based

LEGO Treehouse’s plant bricks are all plant-based

In the year 2018, LEGO started making SOME brings out of sustainable materials, like plant-based polyethylene. They've not exactly pointed out every single bring that's been made with this new material, as it's far more sensible to start in gradually - wouldn't want a mad rush on old LEGO bricks because they'll never exist again, would we? Now, here in 2019, a new LEGO Treehouse set (from LEGO Ideas) will appear with "all 185 plants and leaves" made of "sustainable materials sourced from sugarcane."

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John Oliver: Mt Everest is polluted for want of selfie photos

John Oliver: Mt Everest is polluted for want of selfie photos

Over the last several months, the constant summiting of Mount Everest has popped up in the news - almost always for reasons rather negative. This week, the summiting of Mount Everest gained some major internet attention thanks to a feature on Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. Today we've got both that and this: A bunch of garbage facts that should deter you and your brethren from attempting the once-awesome, now-awful climb to the world's highest peak.

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Glowing dirt could help scientists develop new biofuels and super crops

Glowing dirt could help scientists develop new biofuels and super crops

A new way to explore some of the tiniest life on the planet could have a huge impact on efforts to replace fossil fuels with green alternatives, make crops resistant to drought, and even clean up the environment, researchers have announced. Dubbed BONCAT, the technique allows scientists to better investigate the mysteries of life right under our feet, in the very soil itself.

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Scientists call for increased awareness for microbes and climate change

Scientists call for increased awareness for microbes and climate change

More than 30 microbiologists from around the world have warned that microbes are both impacted by climate change and can influence it. The scientists are calling for microbes to be included in climate change research and to increase the use of research, including innovative technologies and for improved education in classrooms.

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Research chemists replace gold with iron in new catalyst

Research chemists replace gold with iron in new catalyst

The issue with burning fossil fuels in vehicles is that when the fuels burn, carbon dioxide is produced and released into the air contributing to pollution. Researchers are at work on synthetic fuels that are known as carbon-neutral fuels that would be better for the environment. Chemists working on these synthetic fuels recently made a significant breakthrough.

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Renewable energy capacity in the US tips past coal for the first time

Renewable energy capacity in the US tips past coal for the first time

In April, the United States' renewable energy capacity tipped past coal for the first time, according to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This is a milestone for the nation, representing the rapid growth of clean energy as a sustainable alternative to coal. Coal consumption in the US was at its peak in 2008; it now sits around its lowest point in four decades despite the current administration's attempt to prop up the industry.

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Ebola outbreak deaths confirmed as emergency WHO meeting called

Ebola outbreak deaths confirmed as emergency WHO meeting called

On June 11, the World Health Organization announced that officials have confirmed the presence of Ebola virus disease in Uganda, marking the first known instance of the virus spreading from the ongoing crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. On Friday, officials will gather in a meeting to decide whether the Ebola epidemic should be declared an emergency situation that may potentially impact international populations.

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Trash and dead bodies tallied after massive Mount Everest cleanup

Trash and dead bodies tallied after massive Mount Everest cleanup

Every spring when climbing conditions are more favorable, hundreds of people make the trek up Mount Everest alongside porters and guides in hopes of conquering the world's highest mountain. Popularity has increased over the years, resulting in a large quantity of trash scattered along the hiking route. A recent cleanup effort by the Nepal government sought to remove some of this waste.

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Monterey Bay is filled with microplastic from bottles and other trash

Monterey Bay is filled with microplastic from bottles and other trash

A concerning new study published in Scientific Reports reveals that Monterey Bay on the California coast is full of tiny plastic particles known as microplastics. The news comes only hours after a different study warned that Americans are consuming thousands of these tiny particles in food and water every year. The latest research indicates the same may be true for fish.

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Americans consume thousands of microplastic particles every year

Americans consume thousands of microplastic particles every year

Americans consume thousands of microplastic particles every year, according to a new study. Unlike the larger bits of plastic you may find in products, such as microbeads used in exfoliants, microplastic particles are very tiny, typically microscopic, and they often result from larger plastic products that have started to degrade or shed. The health effects of consuming these tiny plastic particles remain unclear.

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