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So what can FaceApp do with your 150 million faces?

So what can FaceApp do with your 150 million faces?

FaceApp isn’t that funny anymore. In a span of weeks, the face-altering app has found itself at the top of the app store, with frightening amount of freedom and power over users' data and information utilization. Developed by Russian company Wireless Lab, FaceApp has seen over 150 million downloads and its hilarious edits seen all over social media.

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How EA can rebuild its reputation

How EA can rebuild its reputation

They might not want to admit it, but it’s no secret EA desperately have a reputation to rebuild. The video game publisher has been repeatedly caught in controversies that have infuriated gamers and employees alike. From complaints about its excessive pay-to-play mechanics, mass layoffs and rushed deadlines that have led to poorly developed games, there is plenty to fix at EA.

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How Microsoft can fix its Windows 10 Updates mess

How Microsoft can fix its Windows 10 Updates mess

Microsoft was mighty proud of its shift to a "Windows as a Service" strategy almost four years ago. It definitely has reason to boast, considering its history of painfully slow updates that came via the rare Service Pack. Redmond, however, seems to have swung to the other extreme in its desire to portray a company that can quickly respond to problems and feedback. Now it has to slow down and take stock of its obviously broken update process to ensure that what's left of Windows 10 credibility won't go down the drain.

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EA doesn’t know why they’re the “bad guy”: Well, here’s why

EA doesn’t know why they’re the “bad guy”: Well, here’s why

Many gamers consider Electronic Arts the bane of the gaming industry. With its cash-grab titles, endless in-game purchases and corporate controversies, it’s hard to imagine how one of gaming’s largest publishers is still standing on its feet.

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Jony Ive’s legacy and life after Apple

Jony Ive’s legacy and life after Apple

If we had to name a designer, the name at the top of most of our heads would be Apple’s design chief, Jony Ive. The British designer has helmed the Apple design team since 1996, developing iconic products from the iMac to the iPhone that were nothing short of revolutionary. Ive has given us all a new appreciation of design, with a taste for minimalistic designs that only keeps what’s absolutely necessary – for better or worse. Love it or hate it, these designs have changed the way we use tech and everyone’s dying to see what’s next from Apple. And after 25 years of service to Apple, Steve Jobs’ right-hand man will finally be stepping down to start his own design studio, LoveFrom. In light of this news, let’s take a look at his gallery of game-changing designs and what’s to come for tech’s greatest designer.

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The best games aren’t being made by big studios anymore

The best games aren’t being made by big studios anymore

I'm not sure if you've noticed, but the AAA games industry is in a pretty sorry state at the moment. Big publishers spend months hyping their games up only to launch titles that feel designed to squeeze as much money as possible out of players. Then, when forced to defend these practices, they have the audacity to suggest that their "surprise mechanics" are ethical and fun for everyone involved.

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Become a data hoarder or become a dependent

Become a data hoarder or become a dependent

Your grandpa and grandma were right about keeping all those buffalo nickels in a big glass jar - they were just a few decades too early. Today I'd like to direct your attention to your photo collection. You've taken hundreds or thousands of photos in the last few years, right? Do you know where all those photos ended up? If you wanted to see the first photos you ever captured using a smartphone, could you do it right now?

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Samsung’s fixed Galaxy Fold is reportedly ready. Are we?

Samsung’s fixed Galaxy Fold is reportedly ready. Are we?

Samsung has reworked its flawed folding smartphone, and according to the leaks the Galaxy Fold is ready to take a second attempt at launching: question is, are we ready? The clamshell Android was to be Samsung's 2019 flagship, a triumphant demonstration that - despite lawsuits and criticisms from rivals - the South Korean firm is a true innovator in the space.

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Microsoft has a brighter future in mobile computing with Windows on ARM than x86

Microsoft has a brighter future in mobile computing with Windows on ARM than x86

Rumors about a Surface with an ARM processor has fans both excited and skeptical. That wouldn’t be Microsoft’s first dance with ARM, not even its first ARM-based Surface computer. In almost all cases since the first Surface, Windows on ARM has ended up being a disappointment.

It is almost as if the computing gods were sending Microsoft a not so subtle message to stick with Intel and ARM or, in general, the x86/64 architecture. That may be the easy way out, but it won’t last for long. For better or worse, and Intel certainly won’t like it, Microsoft needs to move heaven and earth to make Windows work perfectly on ARM because its future there will be more promising than on a hardware platform that’s showing its age and limits.

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Linux’s success in servers could pose problems for the Linux desktop

Linux’s success in servers could pose problems for the Linux desktop

The cat is out of the bag and Steve Ballmer’s worst nightmare has just come true. Microsoft, once the most outspoken enemy of Linux and open source software, not only loves it but may have just become dependent on it. Its cloud computing platform Azure has long offered customers the choice between Linux and Windows virtual machines.

Now a Microsoft engineer has just admitted that Azure customers have preferred using Linux instead of Windows servers. But what is a clear win for Linux in this market could also negatively affect other aspects of the operating system, most especially “The Linux Desktop” everyone loves talking about.

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5G launches with teething problems

5G launches with teething problems

Mobile users around the world are finally getting a taste of 5G. Telcos in several major cities have launched their 5G infrastructure, letting select users with 5G-enabled phones experience its blistering data speeds. Cities include London, Manchester, New York City, L.A. and Sydney – a list that is sure to expand over the years.

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Why are e-cigarettes so problematic? A look into San Francisco’s decision to ban its sales

Why are e-cigarettes so problematic? A look into San Francisco’s decision to ban its sales

San Francisco has voted to ban the sale of electronic cigarettes, nicotine devices that have become extremely popular among teenagers. The move comes as a surprise as the city is home to Juul, the world’s largest manufacturer of the e-cigs. However growing fears of addiction among youth and the lack of research on the impact on our health has led to authorities taking a better-safe-than-sorry stance on the cigarette alternative.

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