Major Digimon Survive release date delay official: Q2 at least

Chris Burns - Oct 15, 2020, 9:41am CDT
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Major Digimon Survive release date delay official: Q2 at least

Bandai Namco Entertainment America Inc. announced on the 15th of October that they’d be moving Digimon Survive to 2021. This game was originally expected to be released inside the fourth quarter of 2020, but circumstances dictated that the company needed to give the game more time in development before it was ready to prime time. A statement from Kazumasa Habu was released this morning for the public to peruse.

The Digimon Survive team originally planned to launch Digimon Survive in the year 2020, most recently preparing to launch said game in the last months of the year. “Current world events have shifted our development timing and we have made the difficult decision to push Digimon Survive’s launch to 2021,” said the statement from Kazumasa Habu.

Per the statement, Kazumasa Habu “thank you for all your continued patience as we work to create a fun and engaging tactical RPG game along with a memorable story for Digimon fans!” In association with TOEI Animation, this Digimon title is now scheduled for 2021 – likely into the second quarter.

The statement from Kazumasa Habu notes that they’ll have some “exciting updates for Digimon Survive in Spring 2021.” That means AFTER winter, and “exciting updates” does not necessarily mean full initial release. Once the game is actually released, for real, it’ll be on several major platforms.

Digimon Survive will be released “to the Americas” on several platforms, including PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PCs via Steam inside the year 2021. By then the Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5 will be out in stores and in the living rooms of gamers around the world.

It’ll be interesting to see how long it’ll be before companies stop producing new games for consoles that’ve been replaced by newer iterations of their old selves with this latest generation flip. In the past, we’ve seen games produced well beyond the last production date for certain consoles – this is most common among consoles that’ve become cult classics, like the original Nintendo Entertainment Center, Sega Genesis, and Sega Dreamcast.


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