Stanford

Stanford creates CasMINI gene editing system

Stanford creates CasMINI gene editing system

Researchers have created a significantly smaller version of the CRISPR gene editing system they call CasMINI. CRISPR has been used for gene editing for a long time and works like molecular scissors. Traditional CRISPR has multiple functions and can be used as a cutter or, in more advanced techniques, can be used to edit, label, or as an imager. While there are many different CRISPR systems in use today, Stanford researchers say they're all too large to deliver easily directly into living organisms, cells, and tissues.

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New tool dramatically speeds up research into enzymes

New tool dramatically speeds up research into enzymes

Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new tool they say dramatically speeds up the study of enzymes. The new tool allows thousands of very small experiments to run simultaneously on a single polymer chip. It was designed specifically to allow scientists to study enzymes faster and more comprehensively than possible in the past.

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Study reveals mechanics behind bubbles popping

Study reveals mechanics behind bubbles popping

Researchers at Stanford University have conducted a study involving high-speed cameras to reveal how bubbles form and eventually burst. The study also used analytical modeling to reveal a new popping process. The researchers are looking into bubbles popping, which seems benign on the surface because bubbles are undesirable in the oil, pharmaceutical, and bioreactor industries.

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Researchers create an accurate system for counting calories burned during exercise

Researchers create an accurate system for counting calories burned during exercise

One of the challenges for those who exercise and watch what they eat in an effort to lose weight is knowing exactly how many calories are burned during exercise. There are numerous apps and wearable devices, such as the Apple Watch and Fitbit, that claim to show the number of calories burned during a workout. The problem is that those calorie counting systems are often highly inaccurate, making it difficult to count calories in and calories out with accuracy.

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Stanford researchers create stretchable circuits that flex with the body

Stanford researchers create stretchable circuits that flex with the body

A group of researchers from Stanford have spent the last two decades working to develop skin-like integrated circuits that can be stretched, folded, bent, twisted without damaging their operating capability. The stretchable circuits can return to their original shape every time they are stretched. One major hurdle that has been in the way of the research is determining how to produce the new technology in large enough quantities for commercialization.

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Stanford’s new algorithm compares cells across species to find similarities

Stanford’s new algorithm compares cells across species to find similarities

A Group of bioengineers from Stanford University has developed a new algorithm with a unique and specialized function. The algorithm was designed to compare cells across different species. The algorithm can identify similar cellular types no matter the species and can be used in creatures including fish, mice, flatworms, and sponges that have been diverged evolutionarily for millions of years.

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This injectable gels contain slowly dissolve medicines

This injectable gels contain slowly dissolve medicines

Researchers from Stanford University have made breakthroughs that could lead to injectable gels to release medications over time. The researchers say that injecting patients with a gel that dissolves over several months could replace the need to administer daily or weekly shots. Before the breakthrough can happen, researchers have to create a Jell-O-like gel substance able to perform well inside the body.

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Poor memory linked to attention lapses and device multitasking

Poor memory linked to attention lapses and device multitasking

Stanford scientists can predict if an individual will remember or forget based on neural activity and pupil size. Researcher Anthony Wagner from Stanford University says that everyone has been frustrated at some point due to not recalling information and expressing it when needed. He says that science has tools to explain why individuals might fail to remember something stored in memory from moment to moment.

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Solar panel tech helps Stanford researchers create ultrahigh-res OLED screen

Solar panel tech helps Stanford researchers create ultrahigh-res OLED screen

Stanford researchers have worked with collaborators in Korea to develop a new OLED architecture that borrows solar panel technology. The new displays could be used in televisions, smartphones, and virtual or augmented reality devices. Researchers say the screens could provide resolutions of up to 10,000 PPI.

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