Earth

Google Earth creates 30-year timelapses of climate change

Google Earth creates 30-year timelapses of climate change

Google has announced a new Google Earth Timeplapse feature, created in partnership with Time, that presents satellite imagery from 32 years of the Earth's surface in animations to show in detail how our planet is changing. Google Earth has added an additional four years of maps to what was available before, and now makes use of higher-resolution images that offer greater surface details, as well as animations with consistent color and quality.

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Diamonds might be more common deep under the Earth

Diamonds might be more common deep under the Earth

Diamonds may be a girl's best friend, but those friends might be easier to find than formerly believed. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University have developed a model they believe means that in the deep, deep Earth, diamonds might not be rare at all. This is based on a theory that diamonds can be formed not just by the "redox" reactions commonly believed to have produced the diamonds we know today but also by water passing through rocks. Luckily for the diamond market, it's not going to make jewelry cheaper. At least not yet.

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NASA website shares new daily photos of Earth

NASA website shares new daily photos of Earth

Following the release of a handful of new images of Earth taken by NASA's DSCOVR (Deep Space Climate Observatory) satellite over the past few months, the space agency has launched a new section of its website that showcases daily photos of our "blue marble." The website, found at epic.gsfc.nasa.gov, will post 12 new photos per day, all taken of the Earth over the last 24 hours as it rotates. The images are all taken by DSCOVR's camera, known as EPIC, or Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera.

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LawBreakers trailer destroys Earth’s moon, fudges science a bit

LawBreakers trailer destroys Earth’s moon, fudges science a bit

In the first trailer for the Boss Key production LawBreakers, this game suggests what might happen were our moon to suddenly explode. They suggest that this explosion was caused by humans - that'd be a feat in and of itself: this massive rock is 3,475 km in diameter and not an easy nut to crack. The moon would require the equivalent of 30 trillion megatons of TNT to destroy - 600 billion nuclear warheads or more. Luckily, "clandestine government testing on the lunar surface" has this covered.

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NASA’s EPIC new photos show our moon’s brilliance

NASA’s EPIC new photos show our moon’s brilliance

NASA has released a new sequence of images offering a rare, and incredible, look at the moon passing in front of the sunlit side of Earth. The images, which NASA ever so kindly shared as a GIF, the internet's favorite format, are impressive in that they clearly depict the relationship between our planet and the lunar surface, with the comparison revealing just how bring Earth really is. Also impressive is the fact that the photos were captured from about 1 millions miles away.

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NASA releases hypnotizing new image of Earth

NASA releases hypnotizing new image of Earth

While much of the buzz from NASA recently has been about the New Horizons' trip to Pluto, the agency hasn't totally forgotten about the blue orb we inhabit. Captured from a camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory, NASA has just released the satellite's first view of the sunlit side of Earth from 1 million miles away, and it sure is stunning. The image shows North and Central America, with the Caribbean islands located in the turquoise areas in the center.

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We’re three minutes from Doomsday

We’re three minutes from Doomsday

Climate change and the unrelenting development and stockpiling of nuclear weapons have seen the Doomsday Clock pushed another minute closer to global disaster, with scientists warning that we're three metaphorical minutes from destruction. The clock, a symbolic representation of how close humanity is to teetering on the edge of effective annihilation by its own hand, is now just three minutes from midnight, with the team in charge of the hands - the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, counting seventeen Nobel Prize laureates among its members - ominously suggesting that "the probability of global catastrophe is very high."

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Sub shows Antarctic ice not as thin as we thought

Sub shows Antarctic ice not as thin as we thought

When we discuss the overall health of our planet, we typically have to entertain the idea that ice is melting at a rate quicker than we’re comfortable with. The way we currently measure ice is via satellite flyovers and boring through ice caps, which doesn’t give as accurate a picture as we’d like. A new submarine, dubbed SeaBED, is taking much of the work below the surface. The unmanned sub sends a sonar blast from the bottom, and what we’re learning is that ice caps may not be as thin as we’d imagined.

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Study: lightning strikes will increase with global warming

Study: lightning strikes will increase with global warming

In a picture of the dystopian future many paint for us, the world is scorched, and full of powerful storms. A new report suggests that might not be too far from the truth, should climate change continue unfettered. In a study published today in the Journal of Science, we find that the new thinking around climate change will bring increased lightning storms. According to the study, every two degrees fahrenheit we see in global warming will result in 12% more lightning in the US.

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Siberian sinkhole believed to be effect of global warming

Siberian sinkhole believed to be effect of global warming

A strange sinkhole at “the end of the world” has scientists baffled. Nobody knows quite why it’s there, or what could have prompted its formation. Early theories suggest it’s an effect of global warming, though no specific cause has been identified. Other speculate space debris could be to blame.

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Gliese 832c possibly habitable but has extreme seasons

Gliese 832c possibly habitable but has extreme seasons

Don't get your hopes up yet for galactic colonization, but a new planet has just been added to the Habitable Exoplanets Catalog. Gliese 832 c of the Gliese 832 star system is theorized to have temperatures close to Earth's, making it possibly habitable except for one glaring flaw: it has large seasonal shifts.

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Apple issues Earth Day burn to Samsung

Apple issues Earth Day burn to Samsung

A number of publications being distributed across the UK this week are carrying an Apple-made advertisement coinciding with Earth Day. As Apple’s ongoing court case with Samsung rolls on in the background, these ads run right out in public, suggesting one very pointed issue. "There are some ideas we want every company to copy," it says, suggesting that their eco-friendly initiatives are not under copyright like their patents.

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