Science made a safer avocado, but you can’t get it yet

Brittany A. Roston - Dec 11, 2017
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Science made a safer avocado, but you can’t get it yet

If you’ve ever prepared a meal containing an avocado, you’re likely aware of how annoying the process can be. The large seed in the center makes slicing an avocado a little more tricky than other fruits, a problem compounded by the slippery flesh. The fruit’s popularity has resulted in a growing number of avocado-related hand injuries, a problem that now has an adequate solution: a new variety of seedless avocado that doesn’t need peeled.

Whereas a traditional avocado is usually round or shaped a bit like a tear drop, a new variety of avocado that has launched in the UK is different. Called a cocktail avocado, this new variety is shaped almost like a jalapeno pepper, being slim around the middle with a decent, oblong length. Unlike traditional avocados, which have a thick skin that needs peeled off, cocktail avocados have a thin, edible skin.

Instances of people seriously injuring their hands while attempting to cut avocados have increased dramatically enough that the UK has even considered putting warning labels on them. However, that may not be necessary if the new cocktail avocado becomes widely available. According to The Guardian, this version is being sold by retailer Marks & Spencer, which is referring to it as the “holy grail” of avocados.

Unfortunately, you’re not likely to be able to get your hands on one yourself, though, unless you’re near one of those stores that sell them…and if you can get one before they’re gone for the season. For now, at least, cocktail avocados are only being grown in Spain, and they’re only being made available to buy in December.

Marks & Spencer managed to get what it describes as a limited supply of these avocados, which are otherwise only found at very few high-end restaurants. Now that the general public has a chance to get them, though, the increased awareness may spur larger future crops and a greater — though no doubt still pricey — availability.

SOURCE: The Guardian


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