Samsung Galaxy S II Review

Chris Davies - Apr 26, 2011, 9:13 am CST
226
Samsung Galaxy S II Review

Samsung has a lot riding on the Galaxy S II. When your displays, chips and memory are found in the flagship devices of OEMs around the world, you have to expect consumers will demand more from the hardware that bears your brand. The Galaxy S II (aka Galaxy S 2 or GSII) has even more to live up to: the original Galaxy S spawned several carrier variants that helped it become the best-selling Android smartphone in the US last year, and positioned Samsung as one of the key names to beat in the segment. So, with dual-core – and freshly overclocked – processor at the ready and a huge, Super AMOLED Plus display providing some eye-catching glitz, the Galaxy S II wades into the crowded smartphone market. New Android king or pretender to the throne? Check out the full SlashGear review after the cut.

Hardware

The original Galaxy S wasn’t a small phone, with a 4-inch Super AMOLED display to accommodate. With the Galaxy S II, Samsung boosts the screen to 4.3-inches and the technology to Super AMOLED Plus, the latest high-end evolution of its OLED panels. Thanks to some judicious dieting they’ve ended up with a broad, long, slimline handset – 125.3 x 66.1 x 8.49mm and 116g – that’s actually leading the pack in terms of thinness. In the hand it’s a mixture of textured plastics and a full Gorilla Glass front panel, that feels surprisingly lightweight and creak-free.

Super AMOLED Plus may have a name that sounds pure marketing speak, but its performance is anything but. As before, the picture seems to sit practically on top of the phone, a bright, vividly colorful splash of eye-pleasure. Viewing angles are so broad you could mistake it for a mocked-up store dummy, and the touchscreen is responsive and swift. Our only complaint is the resolution: while WVGA 800 x 480 is pretty much par for the course in mid- to high-end smartphones, the HTC Sensation will bring along an identically-sized qHD 960 x 540 panel later in 2011. Without a Sensation on-hand to properly compare, it’s tough to say whether the Galaxy S II’s brilliant panel technology will be preferable to the HTC’s extra Super-LCD pixels. As it stands, even stretching WVGA over 4.3-inches, the Samsung doesn’t show any pixelation or graininess, and even in direct sunlight proved easily readable.

Samsung Galaxy S II Extreme Unboxing:

Under the display is a central physical home button flanked by a touch-sensitive menu key on the left and a back key on the right. Holding down the menu button calls up search. A narrow volume rocker lives on the left edge while the power/lock button is on the right; some people are used to that from the Galaxy S and Nexus S, but we still wish Samsung would put the key on the top, next to the 3.5mm headphone socket, as is more common.

On the base of the phone is a microUSB port which also supports the MHL standard for HDMI connectivity, assuming you have the correct adapter cable. That’s handy, since the Galaxy S II is capable of shooting Full HD 1080p video at 30fps, still something of a rarity in the market. The camera has autofocus and an LED flash, and is set in a textured battery panel underneath which you’ll find the SIM slot and microSD card slot. In a somewhat unusual flip, the SIM can be removed without taking out the battery – though it takes a power-cycle to recognize a different card – whereas a microSD card cannot.

Up front is a 2-megapixel camera for video calling and vanity shots, sharing bezel space with the earpiece, proximity sensor and light sensor. They’re joined by the usual accelerometer, g-sensor, GPS/A-GPS and digital compass. With the right adapter you can plug USB devices such as memory sticks into the Galaxy S II, too, thanks to USB On The Go support.

Keeping things running is a 1.2GHz dual-core Samsung Exynos processor paired with 1GB of RAM and 2GB of ROM. Two Galaxy S II SKUs will be offered, one with 16GB of internal storage – of which just over 11GB is available to the user – and another with 32GB. Each can handle up to a 32GB microSDHC memory card. Connectivity includes quadband GSM and quadband HSPA (850/900/1900/2100), Bluetooth 3.0+HS and WiFi a/b/g/n, making the Galaxy S II one of the more complete wireless powerhouses we’ve seen; only Nokia’s pentaband HSPA smartphones go the extra step.

Samsung Galaxy S II overview:

[vms b71134d53e20206bd6fe]

In short, there’s a whole lot going on in the Galaxy S II, and it’s a continuous surprise that Samsung has managed to keep it so light and thin. The broad fascia is mitigated by a slimline build that makes it easy to drop the phone into a front trouser or inside jacket pocket, and the Gorilla Glass front leaves us a little more confident that doing so won’t see you snap the Samsung in two.

Software and Performance

Samsung has sensibly started with Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread from the off, and Google’s latest version for smartphones flies on the dual-core Exynos chip. What will polarize is the presence of TouchWiz, Samsung’s custom software reskin. It’s an acquired taste, certainly, though has become somewhat more palatable over the course of its various iterations.

The iconography is still somewhat cartoonish, and we still can’t figure why Samsung decided to make the left-most homescreen pane the default; we prefer the native center-bias of untampered Android. Samsung’s widgets – for news, weather, calendar, bookmarks, various clocks, social networking and a task manager, among others – are also more colorful than, say, those HTC uses in Sense, but there’s a good range on offer and we prefer Samsung’s system for choosing from them.

Long-press on the homescreen and the current view shrinks to fit a pane of options along the bottom, including shortcuts, widgets and other content; you can then sweep between homescreens to drop them in. A similar system is on offer in the main app menu, including the ability to add new pages as well as drop icons on top of each other to make folders. Simple tooltip pages show up along the way to help smooth the process for new users.

Something we wish Samsung had left well alone was the standard Gingerbread keyboard. The replacement is frustrating in various minor ways: we had problems with it recognizing faster text-entry, particularly missing spacebar taps, while the auto-prediction and auto-correction aren’t as accurate as Android’s native system. Auto-capitalization is inconsistent – sometimes “i” doesn’t get automatically changed to “I” – as is apostrophe entry, so you end up with “im” rather than “I’m” most of the time. Swype is preinstalled, though not the default, and of course there are multiple alternative keyboards to choose from in the Android Market, so it’s certainly not a dealbreaker.

Samsung’s other main change is under the “Motion” heading in the settings page, using the Galaxy S II’s accelerometer to control various functionality. You can have the phone mute incoming calls and sounds by turning it face down, or zoom in and out of webpages or images by touching two fingers to the screen and tilting the whole thing back or forward. We had mixed results with the latter, with our movements sometimes not being recognized. It’s also very linear: you can’t angle the phone as you tilt it, to shift the portion of the screen which you zoom in on.

There are various preloaded apps, and some of the native Android software bears evidence of Samsung’s inability not to tinker. The Calendar has had a generally successful redesign – we like the different agenda, month and today widgets – while the Mail app is also tweaked; we generally used the excellent Google Gmail app, however. Samsung’s media player software is much preferable to the native Android version, and adds album art and music controls to the drop-down notification menu. That also has shortcuts for toggling WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, sound and auto-rotation, though not the handy app switcher HTC Sense offers; still, you can long-press the home button to see the six most recent apps as well as jump straight into Samsung’s task manager.

The other apps include preloaded photo and video editing software – more on which later – along with Samsung Apps, the company’s own download store, Polaris Office, an IM client (supporting Windows Live, Google Talk and Yahoo! Messenger), FM radio, News & Weather and a Memo app. There’s also Mini Diary, Samsung’s attempt to get us all penning frequent journal updates (complete with snapshots and as much angst as the average Android owner can manage) along with the My Files manager that, frustratingly, couldn’t actually open an .apk side-loaded file (which a third-party file manager handled with no issues).

Then there’s the wireless stuff, Samsung AllShare and Kies air. AllShare is Samsung’s DLNA client, allowing you topush content from the phone to your HDTV or pull content from a NAS or other device. Kies air, meanwhile, adds wireless access to the entire phone: rather than using Samsung’s Kies desktop management app – currently for PC only – over a USB connection, you run Kies air on the Galaxy S II and punch the IP address it gives you into your PC or Mac browser. That then allows you to browse multimedia on the phone, bookmarks, call logs, contacts and messages, stream music saved on it and copy across content via WiFi.

It’s all limited to computers on the same WiFi network as the phone – not over 3G, like HTCSense.com – but it works surprisingly well, if a little sluggish when dealing with larger files. We’d like to see some media sharing and social network integration there, though: it would be useful to be able to upload photos and video direct to only galleries at Flickr and Facebook, for instance. Samsung has also given the Galaxy S II WiFi Direct support, the new point-to-point file transfer standard that wants to replace Bluetooth (though of course the S II also has Bluetooth 3.0).

Finally, there are the various Samsung Hubs: Social, Music, Readers and Gaming. They work roughly as you’d expect from the names, so the Social Hub pulls in email, Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, LinkedIn and IM messages into a single timeline. The Music Hub is an on-device download store for individual tracks – priced at around £0.99 in the UK – or albums, and powered by 7digital. The Readers Hub does roughly the same thing, for digital newspapers, ebooks and magazines (from PressDisplay, Kobo and Zinio respectively). Finally, the Game Hub offers a range of Gameloft titles and other “social” mini games, though frankly the selection is better in the regular Android Market.

Performance is consistently strong: apps load swiftly, the gallery thumbnails populate instantaneously, and pinch-zooming is lag-free. Google Maps loads and locates you faster than on any other device we’ve seen, and the mapping renders as quickly as you can scroll. Raw benchmarks only tell part of the story, but the Galaxy S II scored 2939 in Quadrant Standard and 3540 in Quadrant Advanced, 46.939 MFLOPS in Linpack Pro, while the SunSpider test for browser performance came in at 3584.3ms (lower is better). We’ve a feeling that custom ROMs on this particular handset will simply fly.

Camera and Multimedia

With its Super AMOLED Plus display and high-resolution cameras, the Galaxy S II obviously has plenty of multimedia potential. The main camera, at 8-megapixels, is a welcome step up from the 5-megapixel example in the original Galaxy S; the front-facing camera is, at 2-megapixels, at the top end for what we’ve seen studding the bezels of recent smartphones. In contrast, the iPhone 4 and HTC’s recent line-up offer mere VGA resolution. Still, it’s good enough for voice calling and the occasional vanity snap, but not really anything more thanks to the fixed-focus lens.

Happily the same can’t be said for the main camera, which is capable of some very impressive, natural looking shots. Colors are accurate and Samsung’s camera software thankfully doesn’t over-sharpen or introduce unnecessary artifacts. The pictures may not exactly “pop” like the somewhat exaggerated shots the Sony Ericsson XPERIA Arc produces, but we’d rather have more manual control over post-processing than the Arc allows. Lower light shots aren’t quite as successful, not unusual for a phone camera, with a tendency to lose detail in darker areas. Still, the LED flash helps some.

Settings include exposure, various effects, white balance, a choice between auto-focus, macro or face-detection, ISO, metering (centre-weighted, spot or matrix), blink detection, GPS geotagging and anti-shake. There’s also an outdoor visibility mode for the camera app, which tweaks the UI color scheme for easier use in direct sunlight; however, we found the Super AMOLED Plus display was admirably visible in bright conditions.

Video, meanwhile, can be recorded in anything from MMS-friendly 176 x 144 up through 720p and finally 1080p Full HD. There are settings for exposure, white balance, video quality and various effects, and you can record footage with the front-facing camera as well, though only at a fixed VGA resolution. Whether Full HD or 720p, the Galaxy S II’s video is impressive. Footage is smooth and colors accurate, though the auto-focus system can hunt a little in faster moving scenes. Still, there’s little in the way of glitches or blurring, and playbook looks brilliant on the handset’s display.

Samsung Galaxy S II 1080p sample:

Unfortunately, not everything is up to speed with the Galaxy S II’s 1080p HD. Samsung preloads its “Video Maker” app, which offers clip combination, themes, trimming and various other editing options, but it can only handle 720p HD at most. Meanwhile the HDMI output is not via a regular micro HDMI port but by a combination USB/MHL port: that means you need a special adapter, which Samsung doesn’t include in the box. Unfortunately we did not have access to the correct cable, and so couldn’t test direct HDMI connectivity; we’ll update as soon as we can.

Multimedia playback, meanwhile, sees Samsung’s solid codec support win it points. Audio can be in MP3, OGG, AAC, AAC , eAAC , AMR-NB, AMR-WB, WMA, WAV, MID, AC3, IMY, FLAC or XMF format, while video can be in MPEG4, H.264, H.263, WMV, DivX, Xvid or VC-1, and with up to 1080p Full HD playback support. There’s 5.1-channel pseudo-surround when you’re using headphones, while the speaker is sufficient for some personal use (and there’s Bluetooth A2DP for wirelessly connecting to bigger speakers or headphones if you’d prefer).

Phone and Battery

Big, bright screen, dual-core processor, lots of wireless: you’d be forgiven for assuming the Galaxy S II would gulp down juice like a long distance runner after a race. In actual fact, it’s something of a minor miracle. The standard 1,650 mAh battery took us through two days of use – from off the charger at 7am, through a full day with push email active, the display at maximum backlight while outdoors, lots of photography and some video recording, a couple of YouTube clips, GPS with Google Maps, browsing and some calls, then through the night (again, with push email switched on) and through the next day, only expiring that evening.

That’s ridiculously impressive, and we’ll be watching closely to see if it was a fresh-battery phenomenon or a sign that the Galaxy S II really is in the top tier of current smartphones. Even if you really hammer it with your usage, we’re confident you should get a full day out of a single charge.

Phone performance, meanwhile, was good, with the Galaxy S II clinging tenaciously to a signal. Voice calls are strong, and the speakerphone – though certainly not the loudest we’ve ever heard – is good enough for impromptu conference calls.

Pricing and Value

As Samsung’s new flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S II’s relatively high price is understandable. SIM-free and unlocked, in 16GB form it’s coming in at around £500 ($826); if you want an agreement then it looks like a £35 ($58) per month plan – with a two-year commitment – will get you a “free” phone.

In contrast you’re looking at £45 ($74) per month or more if you want a “free” iPhone 4 16GB, while an HTC Desire HD comes “free” on £25 ($41) per month agreements. No word yet on pricing for the HTC Sensation, but we’re guessing it’ll be in line with the Galaxy S II.

Samsung has a range of official accessories incoming for the smartphone, though so far none have been available for us to review. However, eventually there will be a desk charger (with room to charge a spare battery), an extended battery pack which gives the Galaxy S II a total of 2950 mAh to play with, car chargers and a vehicle dock (Samsung also offers a car interface app in its own app store, which automatically boots when the phone is placed into the vehicle dock), and various cases. There’s also a Sound Station dock, which works as an external amp for the Galaxy S II, and of course the MHL HDMI adapter cable.

Wrap-Up

Make no mistake, the Samsung Galaxy S II could very well be the best Android smartphone on the market today. Several iPhone users we showed it to said it was the first Android device that could turn their heads from Apple’s range, though the iPhone 5, expected to debut in the latter half of this year, should make for a strong incentive for existing owners to stick with iOS.

The HTC Sensation will bring the main Android competition when it arrives later in 2011, with its qHD display a key differentiator from the Samsung. However, it will have to prove itself against the Galaxy S II’s battery life, screen quality and camera, and that’s no easy challenge.

Is it perfect? No, of course not. While we like some of Samsung’s tweaks – the Kies air app is surprisingly useful, for instance – we’d prefer to see a clean Gingerbread install rather than TouchWiz. How much of a delay that UI modification will force on future Android OS updates remains to be seen, and some changes – such as the keyboard – are frankly backward steps. There are also some annoying teething pains, such as the Video Maker app being unable to handle the Galaxy S II’s 1080p footage.

They pale in comparison to the Samsung’s strengths, however. The display belies its WVGA resolution with Super AMOLED Plus technology that manages to be both frugal and visible outdoors, while the dual-core 1.2GHz processor does a similar balancing act with power use and performance. Together they add up to a smartphone with brilliant battery life and the most future-proof hardware we’ve seen to-date. Layer on top of that a great camera, fulsome multimedia support, broad connectivity and a wafer-thin design, and we’re running out of reasons not to buy the Galaxy S II. Samsung has upped not only its game but the benchmark for smartphones in general.


Must Read Bits & Bytes

226 Responses to Samsung Galaxy S II Review

      • I came from a Blackberry back in the day, and thought “I have to have one”.
        My first Android phone had a keyboard, I thought the extra heft was worth it, until I found myself never using it. The onscreen keyboard has too many good features, including autocorrection of words, so if you poke anywhere near the letters you want it figures out your words. Or, you can use keyboards like Swype.
        You don’t get those benefits from a physical keyboard, and the physical keyboard becomes the one with the handicap.

        I’ll gladly trade a keyboard I *now* know I won’t use for pocketability/thinness and lighter weight.

        • Autocorrection is a software feature, it has nothing to do with the differences between a physical and a virtual keyboard. And Swype is great for one-finger user but no good for multiple fingers, so no deal for me.
          And you have to admit that a phone with surface X has almost twice more surface (like 1.6 X) for the keyboard and writing surface if it has a physical keyboard.
          As for feeling that’s a matter of taste but I much prefer the feel of buttons under my fingers (and not some idiotic vibrating).

        • Oh yeah, and give me a physical keyboard instead of thinness any day. I don’t even like phones this thin esthetically.

  1. I also want to know when this comes to the US – to AT&T.
    I have no problem chugging along with a hacked 528mhz HTC Magic on AT&T for a good while until that happens, actually… this thing looks that good.

  2. Very Impressive- nice review :) – though I didn’t agree on the UI or keyboard criticisms, as he didn’t have to be all pernickety about it. :p

    • The default Samsung keyboard really is a step back from the regular Gingerbread keyboard. I installed the stock Android one and my typing speed & accuracy instantly improved. Still, as I said in the review, Android’s flexibility with changing keyboard means it’s not a dealbreaker.

      • what was it you have t do to change the keyboard back to stock android? im looking for something without having to use an app

      • what was it you have t do to change the keyboard back to stock android? im looking for something without having to use an app

  3. Nice review. Just ditched my MyTouch3G for a Vibrant to hold me over until this bad boy later this year. Was sweating the Sensation (Pyramid) but now that specs are out for both this looks like the better choice.

    • On paper, the Sensation has the edge with its qHD display. However, from what I remember from the HTC launch, the panel itself was only average. Samsung’s Super AMOLED Plus technology could well keep the GSII ahead, even with lower resolution.

        • True, though HTC’s use of metal and soft-touch plastic in the Sensation’s construction is arguably preferable to the GSII’s plastics. We’ll have to wait and see when Sensation review units are available…

        • I saw one review claiming that the plastic everybody is complaining about is actually harder to scratch or permanently bend out of shape than aluminum and therefor more practical.
          Esthetically I’d probably like metal better but it doesn’t make much off a difference. The outward design irks me more.

        • I really don’t understand why so many people are obsessed with phone thinness. I’d much rather have a phone twice as thick with a QWERTY keyboard.

      • I’m sorry, but I would take a crisp qHD LCD panel over SVGA OLED in a phone any day, the results will be apparent when comparing fine text rendering, high resolution is a serious advantage in a 4.3 inch display. Unless, of course, you buy a phone to watch movies on, come on…

        • However, sunlight usability is a major factor, in the end probably the most important one…

        • However, sunlight usability is a major factor, in the end probably the most important one…

  4. Awesome phone! Great review…

    I wish they had taken a leaf out of Nokia’s book and included the MHL+HDMI and the USB OTG adapters in the box.

    Still very tempting, though…

    • Agreed, it’s a frustrating omission, especially since the MHL-HDMI cable doesn’t look like it will arrive until June, according to UK retailers.

      • Yeah, I don’t think we’ll see a Nokia level of packaging quality anytime soon, seen as how much emotion these superphones generate… Hook, line and sinker, as stated in comment by “Kc567567”

      • The MHL cable seems kind of superflous since it can send HD wirelessly via WiFi to TVs that support DLNA.

  5. Very nice Review. I currently have an Epic 4G and am very pleased with its performance. I have a couple of concerns, one is can Samsung/Carrier release timely updates to a phone that is considered to be “future proof”? The other concern is will it even come to Sprint? I dont want another physical keyboard though. :)

    • The updates issue is one we’ll have to wait and see about; any modified OS is always going to run the risk of introducing upgrade delays, unfortunately, and Samsung does have work to do to convince users that it can deliver in a timely way.

      As for Sprint, given the success of the original Galaxy S, I would be very surprised if Samsung wasn’t in talks with all of the major US carriers regarding building them their own version of the GSII. That’s my own speculation, though, not based on information from either manufacturer or carrier.

    • That phone is awesome and I would have bought it if only it supported GSM, it’s QWERTY keyboard is the best ever phone keyboard, and I am so sorry all the new best smartphones come WITHOUT physical keyboards, I’d much prefer them (both because of more space and better feeling).
      Maybe the Galaxy 2 will come out in a QWERTY version too, but if it does it will probably had decreased other specs… :(

      • I’d like to see some concrete GPS tests, like how quickly it catches a signal indoors and outdoors and while driving, how precise it is, how much in advance you get your instructions (that depends on the software too of course) etc.
        I’d also like to see some shots or videos of Smart Keyboard or another third-party virtual keyboard being used on it (as the default one is not very good), and info on whether either the default virtual keyboard on this phone or Smart Keyboard or any other virtual keyboard has that text-zoom feature iPhones have, that’s very usefull for placing the cursor in the text precisely (though the Smart Keyboard with the arrow keys should help). Without either the text-zoom feature or arrow keys it’s very hard to precisely place the cursor (using fingers only).
        Thanks.

  6. I read similar reviews on the first gen S ….. which i took in, hook, line and sinker! Now tell us all the things it doesn’t do! I will never touch another samsung phone after the first gen…….. No gps (till 2.3 came out), crap pc connection, wifi that auto-sleeps, exchange calendar disconnects, usb copy glitches, mount/unmount sd card issues and non-existent support. I needed hours of help from galaxy forums to get running.

    Ya Right, i’m going to rush out to buy this one ….. NOT!

    • I’m sorry to hear you’ve had bad experiences with the Galaxy S; I used that phone as my daily device for several months, and was generally pleased with how it performed. I can well understand you being put off the GSII because of that, though I’d also say you’re potentially missing out on an excellent handset. Still, there are several strong looking devices in the pipeline for 2011, so I don’t think you’ll have a problem finding an alternative :)

  7. Great review Chris!

    Will definitely look to get this when it hits South African shores. Samsung has already confirmed it here, and I’ve seen and played with the Galaxy Tab 10.1 as well. Samsung and LG have really stepped up their game with releasing new devices here.

    Any word on official dates for SA yet??? Pricing will probably be insane though. Might have to break out my shiny new credit card lol.

    • Thanks Gareth. Unfortunately I’ve not heard SA release information, but as soon as we know broader availability then we’ll let you guys know, either here on SlashGear or over at AndroidCommunity.com

  8. it seems ridiculous to me that this is the second review i have read where this phone has been marked down for the low resolution of its screen compared to the best of the competition and yet its states you can’t see the individual pixels anyway. So what difference does it make? Some quick research will tell you that the human eye can only recognise a certain number of dpi so what is the point of having a spec race here as they are already well beyond that number.

    • Even if in this particular case the PPI number is meaningless, a reviewer has to inform the readers. Almost everything about this phone is gorgeous but they have to state the facts.

      • Agreed that theh have to cover all the specs for a complete review. It just seems a shame that people seem to believe that more is automatically better when in this case it is not. I believe the tech of this screen is so much more than mere PPI

        • In fact a higher resolution is worse if you dont see the difference because the rendering of games takes more processing power without benefit which can translate in less room additional eyecandy.

    • Moreover with WVGA you won’t have any resolution problems with app. just sayin’.

    • I think you’re right, in that there’s more to a holistic device than a list of specs. I would disagree that I’ve “marked down” the GSII for its WVGA resolution – it’s important to note that there are qHD devices coming down the line, but I also point out that the quality of the Super AMOLED Plus display stands a good chance of making the GSII’s screen the winner, even with a lower native resolution.

      • a lower resolution makes it even less taxing for the processor and i think it helps if you really want to push for multitasking

    • I’ve been using two succesive 17″ monitors for over 10 years with a 1024*768 resolution, that’s something like 10 times less DPI than this phone’s screen, and I can’t see any dots (with perfect vision) and am perfectly satisfied (though I’m going to have to move the resolution way up when I buy my next monitor due to high current LCD natural resolutions), so talking about increasing DPI on such a small screen is simply ridiculous.
      It’s like the MPs of a phone’s camera, with the quality of phone cameras anything over 4 or 5 is absolutely unneccessary.
      Both are just a marketing ploy, keep increasing both to drag customers away from the competition.

  9. it seems ridiculous to me that this is the second review i have read where this phone has been marked down for the low resolution of its screen compared to the best of the competition and yet its states you can’t see the individual pixels anyway. So what difference does it make? Some quick research will tell you that the human eye can only recognise a certain number of dpi so what is the point of having a spec race here as they are already well beyond that number.

  10. it seems ridiculous to me that this is the second review i have read where this phone has been marked down for the low resolution of its screen compared to the best of the competition and yet its states you can’t see the individual pixels anyway. So what difference does it make? Some quick research will tell you that the human eye can only recognise a certain number of dpi so what is the point of having a spec race here as they are already well beyond that number.

  11. nice review, but can someone please push this thing to its limits? I mean any decent phone runs smoothly when nothing is on it and its brand new, but over time apps and widgets reduce its performance by using up memory and CPU by running in background etc. Can someone just show it;’s multitasking for instance, play music and play a game and have something syncing and downloading an app from the app store AT THE SAME TIME etc.. just to show exactly how good this thing is practically (aside from benchmarks) – or run reckless racing for instance (which is a little laggy on my desire even with a custom ROM)…

    Ive seen it running angry birds but that’s hardly taxing is it..nor is swiping through homescreens :/

    l’m buying it anyway but it’s frustrating how the phone is not being demonstrated nearer to it’s full capacity.

    p.s. battery life is nuts tho! 2 DAYS! – unprecedented for this kind of smartphone (without a gr8 deal of effort)

    • I’ll be continuing to put it through its paces and really see how far I can stretch it. If you have any further suggestions I can certainly try things out.

    • I’ll be continuing to put it through its paces and really see how far I can stretch it. If you have any further suggestions I can certainly try things out.

    • 2 Days with all the use they put the new unit through is insane, it must be Plutonium powered. I would have been happy with an average “1 day” usage. That one spec makes a new purchase a no brainer.

      • Personally I’d be happy only if phone batteries lasted for at least a month, or better yet 3 months.
        I charge mine every 4 or 5 days and find it incredibly irritating I have to charge it that often, I think anything less than a week is criminal.
        Of course my current phone is far from a powerfull smartphone, and I don’t need to kill a lot of time and boredom with that Facebook crap like many people these days seem to…

        • As long as it lasts a full day, I’m fine. Not hard to remember to charge it every night before you go to sleep. That makes a daily routine.
           If it lasted 3 months, I would forget to recharge after 2 months and 29 days!

    • Louis I understand your position but seeing as this phone has almost as much hardware power as my current desktop computer (which has been due for an update for a LONG time) the last thing I’m worried about is that lack of hardware power.
      I mean, how much can you need ? The only possible use which might max it out is 3D gaming, and that’s not one of my priority used for a smartphone (calling, texting, surfing, music, camera and GPS all come before it), although I must admit it will be interesting to try gaming on a large-screen smartphone with an accelerometer (which I haven’t yet done).
      In my eyes the only flaws this phone has at the moment are a lack of a physical keyboard (a big flaw for me but one that’s not really relevant to my decision since all the other best current smartphones also lack one) and it’s mediocre (if not ugly) design which seems to mimic the iPhone’s design a lot.
      And I’m sure any potential minor software deficiencies can be remedied, that’s what Android is all about – customization and openness, unlike the iOS.

      • Yh that’s a fair point. Tbh I have tried to max it out lol (I have one now) and it took about 5 3d games running before it started to struggle. I realise this is not representative of everyday use but i guess I wanted to see how far i could push it :) anyway its an incredible phone and my only gripe is I’m not seeing 2 days battery from it, but I’m still in the “new toy: Heavy usage” phase of the relationship.

        P.s. over at xda-developers theres a kernel that allows overclocking to 1.5ghz!!!!!

  12. nice review, but can someone please push this thing to its limits? I mean any decent phone runs smoothly when nothing is on it and its brand new, but over time apps and widgets reduce its performance by using up memory and CPU by running in background etc. Can someone just show it;’s multitasking for instance, play music and play a game and have something syncing and downloading an app from the app store AT THE SAME TIME etc.. just to show exactly how good this thing is practically (aside from benchmarks) – or run reckless racing for instance (which is a little laggy on my desire even with a custom ROM)…

    Ive seen it running angry birds but that’s hardly taxing is it..nor is swiping through homescreens :/

    l’m buying it anyway but it’s frustrating how the phone is not being demonstrated nearer to it’s full capacity.

    p.s. battery life is nuts tho! 2 DAYS! – unprecedented for this kind of smartphone (without a gr8 deal of effort)

    • It doesn’t seem to – at least, there’s no reference to it in the settings or in any of the apps. Whether it has the hardware, but deactivated, I don’t know.

        • There are apparently two versions, according to previous Samsung announcements. Some countries will get NFC-enabled GSIIs and others will get models without NFC. Whether the core hardware is the same is unclear at this stage.

        • Oh no, I hate that different-versions-for-different-countries crap ! I’ll get mine from the US surely, but it’s hard finding out exactly what each online seller is selling, they never state the exact variation or detailed specs. Right now I’m having the same problem with the Asus Eee PC 1015PEM-PU17-WT, the same model number has USB 2.0 with some sellers and USB 3.0 with others, it’s a real headache !

  13. Chris I have to say the whole review is excellent but the best part are those pics ! Some of the coolest pics I’ve ever seen in a review.
    I was already seriuously considering a SGS2, and your review didn’t change that, but what it did do was make me order one of those adorable Android collectible plastic minis from eBay right away. I took a look at the selection and chose the transparent green one just like yours. I was also tempted by the steampunk one, the unique vampire looking one, the transparent blue one and the glow-in-the-dark-one but in the end I chose this one cause it’s cute and faithfull to the original.

    • P.S.
      By the cool pics I meant the ones with the plastic android. Though the others are very good too, the targets / locations for the camera test pics are really beautifull and the camera pics are really numerous and thorough.
      Just one “objection” – in this pic : https://c.slashgear.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/samsung_galaxy_s_ii_sg_review_5.jpg the camera should have been facing TOWARDS the android, so it would look like a warm touching hug of two gadgets, this way it looks kind of kinky, it looks like the android is humping the phone back-door-style, the pic should be XXX-rated… :)))

      P.P.S.
      The other reason I chose this version of the plastic android is because some of the others cost ten times more, it’s insane !
      Btw I wish they did something, like drive around or charge your phone or shoot laser beams… :) A real mini android would be even cooler and more usefull, though this is kind of usefull too, I can hold something in it since it’s head comes off. :)

  14. Nice review, Chris.

    I got mine yesterday and I haven’t slept last night.. the display just blows me away!
    Samsung has certainly stepped up the ante with this one!

  15. Nice review, Chris.

    I got mine yesterday and I haven’t slept last night.. the display just blows me away!
    Samsung has certainly stepped up the ante with this one!

  16. Nice review, Chris.

    I got mine yesterday and I haven’t slept last night.. the display just blows me away!
    Samsung has certainly stepped up the ante with this one!

  17. Samsung,

    Regarding the SGS II, my first two thoughts…
    Thought #1: Wow – that looks REALLY nice.
    Thought #2: Fool me twice, shame on me.

    Does the stinkin’ GPS/compass actually work this time? How will phone lag be once you actually load it with contacts and some apps. Yesterday I actually had to pull the battery out of my current Galaxy S in front of a client, after it had completely froze for 3+ minutes while I was trying to make an important call during a meeting. Last week, while trying to make a business call, it froze; I gave up, only to have the phone make the call on it’s own 30-40 minutes later. NOT VERY HAPPY with my current Galaxy S.

    Yes, there are some nice aspects. Great screen, thin, gorilla glass. But I need to use this on a daily basis at work. I don’t what to have to root or hack it with the hopes of improving usability. It should be “useable” from Samsung (to note, I have not rooted mine; fully stock; and my apps are via the Android market; I’m not one for questionable apps or rogue apk’s).

    Is there really any upside to the Samsung interface? The phone is already clearly branded “Samsung” on it’s face; why risk slowing/dulling the usability with a buffer interface on top of the native Android. Not to mention the wrench it throws into future Android upgrades. While waiting for Samsung to roll out both the 2.2 and now 2.3 updates, for periods extending months in both cases, I was repeatedly reminded of how much I’d rather NOT have TouchWiz. Again, I don’t see the upside. Reverse branding?

    Having paid in the neighborhood of $650 6 months ago for a device I’m not very satisfied with, I’m not too keen on the thought of gambling another $850, with my fingers crossed that I’ll have a better user experience. My Nokia E72 wasn’t flashy, but man – rain or shine it did what I needed when I needed. GPS w/Ovi Maps experience is phenomenal; “taxi driver, my phone says to get in the left lane; btw – you’re speeding, and there’s a radar zone up ahead…”

    Samsung, please up your game. The SGS II looks really appealing, but after being had once, my gut reaction is that it’ll be another 2 dressed up as a 9. Fool me once, shame on you… We’re paying good money – A LOT of money – for these things. They should “work”. They should facilitate our daily life, not frustrate it.

    JB.

    • please see the video links i just posted before you, gps works very good and touchwiz is now way cool

    • it even turns on in like 16 sec un-like my gs1, that takes all day if you have loads of files

    • So you’re telling them to up their game based upon assertions that this one will be the same as your one, which is a different phone?

      This just sounded like a moan about your current phone, why don’t you contact the retailer who you purchased it off as it will still be under guarantee.

      Good luck sir.

      • Its just that some of us expect phone to work out of the box as advertised …. not needing a root! If you have such low expectations from a $800 phone good for you …. you won’t be disappointed.

        • Where did I say I had low expectations? Why are you slinging assertions again?

          Have you took it out of the box yet? So how do you know it does not work? Does the reviews all pretty much say it’s very good without any major flaws?

          Your answer is in there somewhere, have a look for it. You may want to also consider kissing girls some time as it’s a good alternative to fuming over your electronic products and social inadequacy.

    • Same experience for me …. but am NOT using it for business. Yes it has a great screen but the new iphone looks just as good …. the misses far outweigh the screen. Is it too much to ask for a proper, reliable, easy to install USB interface to a PC???

    • There are a couple of people on XDA-Developers who have got early access to this phone. They’ve tested the GPS performance, and have said that it locks on within a few seconds. Definitely not a repeat of the original SGS in that respect.

  18. Great review.
    Any idea on the hackability of the SGS II? Is the bootloader locked or encrypted etc?

  19. Does anyone know how to get that unread message counter and that weather widget that is displayed in the Samsung Vibrant ?

  20. Looks pretty nice, but wow do Samsung need to release something that isn’t based on an Apple product appearance-wise.

    I wonder if we’ll see an iPhone with a larger screen soon?

    • What Apple product appearance-wise? You mean the App Drawer? It’s like saying my HP laptop’s Bios looks like some Apple’s desktop.
      I never saw on my iPhone live wallpaper’s or widgets.
      And TouchWiz 4’s App drawer doesn’t look anymore like iPhone’s interface. And it’s based on SPB Shell 3D.

      • The UI is a bit iPhone-like, but worse is the outside, which is very iPhone-like ! Just look at the front side !

      • The UI is a bit iPhone-like, but worse is the outside, which is very iPhone-like ! Just look at the front side !

      • I mean the phone’s hardware itself looks REALLY close to an iPhone 4 when it’s powered off and looked at front on, just like the original Galaxy S looked REALLY close to the 3GS. That was a bit worse though.

  21. Hi Chris. Something missing in all reviews is exchange integration. Especially whether or not it can access and save contacts from a GAL. (Search company directory or address book) in some of the other mobiles)

    I assumed the SGS1 could do it based on the fact that the HTC’s and Motos that I have seen could do it. Alas it could not. Very disappointing.

    Would appreciate if you could explore all the “Enterprise Features” Samsung sell so hard.

  22. I really really want this phone on Verizon. Although I get the feeling it won’t be LTE nor will it be on Verizon for several months if it comes at all. This would probably be the only phone that I’ll gladly pay full price for since I still have a year left on my contract. :|

  23. All those people who were waiting for Samsung Galaxy S 2 to arrive in the market must be making merry as the gadget has been launched in the market. it is equipped with all those features which you could ever think of. you name it and its there in the handset. NFC has been provided in the gadget which will make you available with wallet less buying. there are some very lucrative kind of deals available with the smartphone of all smartphones. recently, i was going through a portal Bestcontractmobilephone.co.uk and found out that some of the most lucrative deals are available there on the website.

  24. The ported Touchwiz 4 for Galaxy S shows some differences from your pictures (Tte Home/Application icon and numbers for panel). Also on the ported Touchwiz the Home Screen is on panel 4.

  25. Hi chris. i am a first time user to your site. thank you for the great review. I’m confused b/w galaxy s2 and xperia arc. Which is a better looker? nd which has a better camera?. help me chris…

    • Arc is simply a looker… from the pictures, it looks stunning. Never seen a real one though. However in terms of ‘black depth’, Samoled Plus scored perfect ‘0’ in depth while Arc scored 0.03

    • Arc is simply a looker… from the pictures, it looks stunning. Never seen a real one though. However in terms of ‘black depth’, Samoled Plus scored perfect ‘0’ in depth while Arc scored 0.03

    • So does your brand new Toyota car appreciates in value the moment you took the keys from the salesperson?????

      Talk some sense dude…or better don’t post at all

  26. Most of the complaints you guys have is stuff that can be easily changed within the OS or will be resolved when people throw custom ROMs on this thing. I think it makes sense to not have a minihdmi cable, minihdmi requires a converter anyhow, so it’s just as sensible. Also it wouldn’t make sense to include an adapter because it would need to be fore a variety of cables (hdmi to mini usb, minihdmi to mini usb etc.) More pixels would be nice, but you can’t complain about having a SAMOLED screen.

    • True, mini HDMI needs a converter, but they’re much cheaper than Samsung’s adapter for the GSII – a few pounds in the UK, versus Samsung’s £30!

  27. SAMOLED+ beats any crap SLCD qHD screen available atm. The colours are crazy nice on SAMOLED+ compared to a SLCD qHD.

    The new samsung display has around 300ppi.. witch is more than enough for users. You don’t need a qHD display to be happy.

    • 800×480 on a 4.3″ screen corresponds to 217 ppi, which is not “around” 300. But yes, SAMOLED looks nice.

      • I think Sammy wrote somewhere that with all the new subpixels it’s almost the same as a 300 ppi.. and I understood it wrong then. The 50% new subpixels really make the screen nice. And you can’t see the individual pixels like you can see it on older SAMOLED.

    • And it’s not just the colors, the viewing angles are mind-boggling, I’ve seen it on the Galaxy 1. And the SGS2 is supposed to be much brighter in the sun too.
      Hope to see such screens on a monitor some time soon…

  28. I never thought I’d ever live to see the Samsung brand synonymous with quality smartphones after the Galaxy S update debacle. The Galaxy S II has been universally positively reviewed it’s practically Samsung’s 2nd coming. You got a great product Sammy, now please work on your after sales service! Believe it or not Sammy, that part will make or break your business and reputation!

  29. i just got mine and found that the fixed capacitative buttons are particularly easy to be activated hence causing you to leave the app you are working with or return to previous webpages that you have visited unintentionally

    • Yeah it looks way to cheap to be a top of the line Phone. That back cover is a joke.

      • Metal would be nice, but the plastic is creak- and flex-free and I’ve had no problems with scratches despite not using a case. Considering the light weight I’m willing to go without a metal chassis, but if that’s a deal-breaker for you then you might want to wait until the HTC Sensation arrives.

      • Since when PLASTIC = BAD??? and since when METAL = CLASS?
        you guys obviously don’t know anything… again… assumptions that makes the very mind is bad…

    • Yeah it looks way to cheap to be a top of the line Phone. That back cover is a joke.

  30. I used to like samsung, but since they doing all they can to look like an iPhone, not only on the outside, but also on the inside (yes, I despise TouchWiz too, because it cripples android, and slows down the system) – I hate samsung now, and will never by their phone again. Oh, PS: good luck with the updates, because if you get samsung phone – you will never see them (up to date – there is only one phone that received 2.2 update (which is already out of date))

    • While you are of course entitled to your opinions, me and my Galaxy S with official 2.3.3 firmware like to differ… Samsung was the first large manufacturer to a) produce a phone running Gingerbread (Nexus S) and b) to update their phone to Gingerbread (SGS, as HTC is still nowhere to be seen with the Desire-series updates.)

    • Ur so wrong Corwin1681. Samsung phones do get software updates, Galaxy S, Galaxy Ace and a few more models got updated. please dont bash without facts. Assumptions dont make you look anymore smarter but foolish. Go back to where ur from coz if u hate Samsung, there’s no way why you’re reading this article and leave ur impression.

  31. OK, I like the handset overall but I have only one concern. Can I use it as a phone? Judging from your pictures the signal is not really good on 3G network, it has only one bar compared to original Galaxy that has 3 bars (and original galaxy has a fair phone signal, not that bad but not the best so far)

    • The GSII/GS comparison shots were taken indoors in a basement – it’s not a v.accurate test of general radio performance. I’ve had no problems with the GSII as a phone, and I’d say the voice call quality is better than on the original GS.

  32. its a great smartphone i like it.the best phone running android samsung galaxy s 2.

    • No, not in the UK at least, and I doubt it will in the US either. I’m assuming you’ll have to pay for those accessories separately.

  33. great review. confused b/w xperia arc and galaxy s2. only thing i care is camera. which has d best camera? help me

  34. @e477e8fe946452ba492cb4abb36116b1:disqus the xperia arc has the best camera, in my opinion.. Tested that one myself and fell in love with the resolution and size of images. The phone itself looks a bit cooler too.

  35. The GS2 is looking like Android’s new poster boy at the moment. Rightly so too, Samsung have done a great job on it. The Xperia Arc are for those who like a little more physical style.

  36. This one is a sure winner. Thin, lightweight and is really fast. And as far as looks are concerned, its too good.

  37. this is something like a sandwich discussion…… quite refreshing…… but for all those who loved to see nfc over the gadget…….its long being official that they do not have something like NFC to put in over the so very discussed Samsung galaxy SII…. then it would have been not been of much use — i guess!!

  38. In the wrap up – you write “Samsung Galaxy S II could very well be the best Android smartphone on the market today”. Unfortunately it is not yet effectively in the market, and most of the genuine criticism has been about the lack of detail about release dates in the major markets. Given the HTC’s imminent release and the upcoming iPhone 5, Samsung may well lose customers who decide to wait for these alternatives. Is there more tweaks going on? Or is Samsung building hype? If the later, they may well have overplayed their strategy.

      • As I said – “effectively” ,,,  not yet released in the US Asia or Oceania regions – the major markets for new technology take up…. not even sure about the rest of Europe.

  39. A good phone but I faced some problems with my phone’s charger. The charger broke down within a couple of weeks of purchase. Do twist and turn the charger and then check it before buying it…!!

  40. Apple iphone 5 will be out in a few months. But at present, I think Galaxy S2 beats iphone4.

  41. i think its going to go down to personal preference between the samsumg gs2 or the htc sensation as there is nothing to choose between these in specs just got to pick which one you feel looks the best i reckon i think im going for the gs2 myself  

  42. if it has AWS bands support, I’ll consider it but right now there’s only sensation for me to upgrade from my n1.

  43. Looks great ill definately get one.
    And yes Samsung upgrates their products. I have both galaxy s and galaxy tab.
    And since when plastic is bad. The original sgs is all plastic and is perfect for me really light.

  44. galaxy S2 is better than iphone 4 …….going all the way long……..
    bestcontactmobilephone.blogspot.com/2011/05/samsung-galaxy-s2-vs-apple-iphone-4.html

      • iphone 5 is yet to arrive……though speculations are around and no specifications has been confirmed yet from Apple….. question of comparison can only be arised once the phone itself is out.

  45. galaxy S2 is better than iphone 4 …….going all the way long……..
    bestcontactmobilephone.blogspot.com/2011/05/samsung-galaxy-s2-vs-apple-iphone-4.html

  46. Good things:

    – Awesome screen – all the greatness of OLED (perfect blacks, high contrast, looks good in direct sunlight) without the ugliness that was PenTile. Here you just get the bright, popping colors. Oh, and at 4.3″, it’s a pleasure to look at from any distance. The resolution is still 800×480, though. Wish they’d up it to match iPhone.

    – Very light. I mean, VERY light. Samsung wasn’t kidding when they stressed that point. Considering the size of this thing, it’s very hard to believe. When you put the phone into someone else’s hand for the first time, they usually are confused because they expect it to feel more “solid”, and not so featherweight.

    – Fairly thin. Good if you wear your phone in the pocket of your pants.

    – The UI is buttery smooth, with no hiccups that are common on all other Android phones I’ve seen. Not sure if it’s Samsung’s new powerful GPU (Exynos), software optimizations that they did, or a combination of both, but overall this thing is just as slick as iPhone 4.

    – It can be rooted, and custom ROMs already exist. No signed bootloaders or other similar malarkey.

    – It comes with Android 2.3. That means better perf, WiFi tethering/hotspot out of the box, and the ability to tilt and rotate the map in Google Maps – among other things.

    – It comes with Polaris Office. It is a very nice Android office suite – from what I’ve seen so far, more full-featured than Docs to Go, QuickOffice etc – especially when it comes to supporting advanced MS Office features such as charts. It cannot be purchased from the market, and only comes bundled with select devices, such as this one or Asus Transformer.

    – MicroSD card slot, for all those gigabytes of music.

    Bad things:

    – Battery life doesn’t seem to be so good. It gets through the day, but if you forget to charge it in the evening it won’t last you a second day (except if only on standby).

    – It heats up quite a bit when in active use. More so than any other phone I’ve used. It’s not exactly a surprise considering 1.2GHz dual-core CPU and a powerful GPU, and I suspect that ultra-thin form factor makes cooling less efficient than it could have been otherwise. Overall it’s tolerable, but very noticeable.

    – Some applications seem to be showing images in 16-bit color rather than 32-bit (particularly the browser). This leads to nasty dithering artifacts, especially on bands of clear colors and gradients. Head to XDA-developers forum for Galaxy S II for more details on this. It seems to be a software issue, so future updates may solve it.

    Things to be aware of:

    – Front is full glass, back is textured plastic. I love the back for the texture, which looks pretty nice and gives a good grip when held, but it’s not as “oh, shiny” as iPhone 4. Lack of metal seems to be what makes it so light, among other things. On the other hand, I didn’t notice any creaking, so assembly is high-quality.

    – It runs Android 2.3.3, not any later version (as of this writing). This means no voice/video chat in Google Talk. Google Voice can be installed (in US) and works fine. There’s no clear schedule on official updates so far.

    – Android is not stock, but Samsung’s TouchWiz. This is much less invasive than what you typically see on HTC Android phones, and some changes are fairly nice. But many people prefer stock.

    – No CyanogenMod (as of this writing). There is a thread on XDA forums where you can pledge $$$ for the first person to make CM run on this if you care.

    *** P.S. If you will buy this Smartphone I suggest you have compare price before you decide at: http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fgp%2Foffer-listing%2FB004QTBQ2C%3Fie%3DUTF8%26ref_%3Ddp_olp_new%26condition%3Dnew%23&tag=slashgear.com-20&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=390957

  47. Nice location – Next time do low light photography in Public/Raffles/Embargo pls….;)

    Also La Famiglia is a nice spot for ‘reviewing’ the phone.

    • Unfortunately I think I’d have to be on the cast of “Made In Chelsea” before any of those places would let me in!

  48. For those still looking to get this it is now dropped in price on Amazon! – http://amzn.to/mUt3Bq

  49. well..i really think that Samsung Galaxy SII is the best smartphone ever…in my opinion it has also drained out iPhones in the market……iPhone 5 can only be the competitor of the phone…i will recommed this to every Android user…

  50. Getting this phone on the 24th of July on Sprint!! I think the Iphone was left behind awhile ago.

  51. I’m surprised you didn’t get robbed whilst filming the video clip! Horrible end of Kings Road!

  52. This phone is has set the bar really high and I keep hearing about the Bionic but there are too many ‘ifs’ for my liking. 
    If Motorola change there screen tech to a pixel type that isn’t fussy See link http://www.gsmarena.com/motorola_atrix_4g-review-589p2.php
    If they give it more than 768mb of system available ram rather than 512mb
    If they could speed up there OS upgrade timescales (ask any Motorola customer)
    If the bootloader was unlocked and they sent a phone to Cyanogen (Chance!)
    If they released it any time soon seen as the year is halfway done (Wasn’t this meant to be out at the start of the year?)

    The SGII is out for most of the world with so many shining reviews its unreal and none of the if’s from above. The first Galaxy S phone was so good they made a Nexus S and now I see Nexus Prime may be made by Samsung again?

    • if u compare it to iphone 4, i can assure u to go to this baby… i own both but iphone4 is outdated…. better wait for iphone 5 to compare…

  53. Well all the internet, e-mail, and camera gizmos are great but can you make a phone call with it?

  54. i heard the russians r using gallaxy s2 to spy on us…..S stands for spy……2 stands for the second rise of the soviet power, gallaxy is russian for “you dam yankees”

  55. +great phone, no doubt about it, the best
    -there seems to be a overall problem and discussion on the i-net with the sd-card, it turns the phone on and off repeatedly so I can’t/don’t use any sd-card.
    Anybody with a solution?

  56. +great phone, no doubt about it, the best
    -there seems to be a overall problem and discussion on the i-net with the sd-card, it turns the phone on and off repeatedly so I can’t/don’t use any sd-card.
    Anybody with a solution?