Nokia E7 Review

Chris Davies - Feb 10, 2011, 10:08am CST
Nokia E7 Review

Arriving on the market late, the Nokia E7 finds itself launching at a shaky point in the Finnish company’s history. Under new management, suffering doubts – internal and external – over the strength of its current platforms, and watching increasing amounts of attention and revenue being taken by key rivals like Apple, Nokia has high expectations for its new business flagship. Misplaced, misguided or money in the bank? Check out the full SlashGear review after the cut.

Hardware

The E7 may be the largest of the recent Symbian smartphones – looking at first glance like an oversized N8 and significantly chunkier than the svelte C7 – but inside it’s business as usual. Keeping Symbian moving is a 680MHz ARM 11 processor, paired with 256MB of RAM and OpenGL 2.0 graphics support. Connectivity follows Nokia’s throw-in-the-lot pattern of recent devices, with pentaband UMTS/WCDMA (supporting Euro, T-Mobile USA and AT&T 3G bands in a single device), WiFi b/g/n, Bluetooth 3.0, GPS/A-GPS and an FM radio. Accelerometers, a digital compass, proximity and ambient light sensors, and a front-facing camera for 3G video calls round things out.

The E7 may measure 123.7 x 62.4 x 13.6 mm but there’s still been some compromise in terms of fitting everything in. Gone is the N8’s FM transmitter and microSD card slot, leaving only the 16GB of fixed storage, and there’s no 2mm charging port either. Instead, you get a microUSB port and mini HDMI output, and Nokia bundles both an HDMI adapter (to get a full-sized port) and a USB Host adapter (to plug in a keyboard, mouse, or USB drive) in the retail box.

Nokia E7 unboxing & hands-on:

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The camera also gets a downgrade in comparison to the N8, a mere 8-megapixels versus the photo flagship’s 12-megapixels, and using EDoF (Extended Depth of Field) rather than active auto-focus. It also has a dual-LED flash rather than Xenon. Still, the smaller camera module does allow Nokia to do away with the N8’s unsightly hump.

Controls are limited to a power/profile button on the top edge (in-between the HDMI and 3.5mm headphones ports), a volume rocker and camera shortcut on the right edge, and a lock switch on the left edge. All are beautifully bevelled, the silver aluminum glinting against the matte black finish. A backlit home/menu button sits underneath the 4-inch capacitive touchscreen. That display runs at an underwhelming 640 x 360 resolution – given the size, the pixels are clearly discernible – but the quality of the 16m color AMOLED panel, using Nokia’s Clear Black branded technology, is almost enough to make us forgive the pixel shortage. Colors are rich, blacks inky and the E7 holds its own on all but resolution when put next to a Samsung Super AMOLED screen.

You honestly have to search hard to find a hardware point on which to criticise Nokia. The Finnish company has built a reputation for rock-solid phones – at the budget end and at the premium end – and the E7 is no different. Our only complaint is a slightly rattly lock switch, and when that’s the sum flaws of a handset then the company is obviously getting something right. Of course, we knew that from the N8; what the E7 introduces is a brilliant QWERTY keyboard as well.

We had high hopes for the E7’s ‘board after Nokia World 2010, even having only played with the prototypes the company brought to the show, and the production models don’t disappoint. A nudge at the left edge pops the spring-loaded display open with a pleasing thunk, tilted at a useful angle. The keys themselves consist of four rows of slightly domed, hard backlit buttons, with a broad spacebar and dedicated @ and arrows. Numbers share the top row of letters, triggered with the function key.

The whole thing is perfect for holding two-handed and thumbing out emails and texts. The buttons have just the right amount of resistance and travel – far better than the membrane panels we’ve seen on, say, recent Motorola Android phones – and you can even put the E7 flat on a table and use four fingers for speedier typing. Nokia bills the E7 as the new Communicator, and fans of those business-phones’ full keyboards won’t be disappointed.

Software

The E7 runs Symbian^3, the same PR1.1 release as just made public for the N8, though of course renamed PR1.0 for the newer device. That makes it instantly familiar to existing users, but also means it faces the same uphill struggle to convince would-be buyers that Symbian remains competitive in the face of Android, iOS and other platforms.

It can be easy to overlook Symbian’s strengths. The 680MHz processor may be old tech in comparison to the newest 1GHz single- and dual-core chips we’ve seen on recent Android devices, but it’s certainly sufficient to keep the E7 moving along swiftly. The only real sluggishness we’ve noticed has been in the native Symbian browser, where complex webpages could be slow to render or navigate around. The flip side, of course, is that a low-power CPU means less battery consumption, something we’ll touch on later.

As on the N7, C7 and C6-01, the E7 has the same three-pane homescreen, each with room for up to six widget blocks. Options include email (with the two newest messages from the inbox shown), calendar, speed-dials, sets of four app shortcuts, media controls and entertainment news from Paramount and others. Alternatively there are more on offer to download in Nokia’s Ovi Store. Bizarrely, Nokia continues to insist on introducing artificial lag in swiping between the three panes, something which belies the capacitive touchscreen’s actually responsive performance.

Beyond that it’s generally Symbian as standard. Preloaded is the Ovi Store, Nokia’s photo and video editing apps, QuickOffice and Ovi Maps, among others. Ovi Maps in particular has evolved into a capable Google Maps alternative, complete with turn by turn directions, offline mapping data support and various third-party POI, recommendation and review services. There’s also rudimentary social networking integration, capable of pulling in Facebook and Twitter updates and pushing them to a homescreen widget, though nothing as comprehensive as we’ve seen on Android. Nokia’s sharing functionality falls well short as well; perhaps we’ve been spoiled by Android’s all-inclusive Share feature, which offers both the platform’s homegrown apps and any compatible third-party methods as well, but Nokia’s standard options – by email, message or Bluetooth, or on Facebook or Twitter – fail to open up to other apps you might download from the Ovi Store.

Symbian’s perhaps tired UI will be refreshed in a software update expected later this year, and that really can’t come too soon. Little things, like the absence of a QWERTY keyboard in portrait orientation – instead you get a T9-style numeric keypad with numbers – jar the user experience somewhat, though at least the E7 has its physical ‘board to salve the pain. Filling in text boxes using the on-screen keyboard (both portrait and landscape) still insists on calling up a separate dialog pane, though thankfully the same isn’t true when you’re using the hardware keyboard.

Nokia’s native browser is also due for an overhaul, useful since right now it’s outclassed by rival devices. There’s Flash Lite 4 support (for most Flash Player 10.1 content), which is welcome, but there’s no text-reflowing on zoom which makes for plenty of pinch-zooming or panning if you want to read blocks of text. The relatively low screen resolution also makes its presence known; where on rival devices with similar-sized displays you can often read text at low levels of zoom, the E7’s 640 x 360 simply lacks the pixels for that degree of crispness.

The Ovi Store offers some salvation, with the popular Opera Mobile Browser being one of the most downloaded titles (and offering a far better online experience). There are also mainstream titles like Skype – which works very well for voice and IM chat – and popular Twitter app Gravity (which we still say Nokia should buy and install as standard). Unfortunately, there are also plenty of gaps where rival platforms iOS and Android have big name apps; it’s worth exploring the Ovi.com site to see if anything you particularly rely on is available on Symbian yet.

For enterprise, out of the box there’s support for multiple email accounts – with presets for Exchange, Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, Ovi Mail, Hotmail, and various ISP accounts – together with threaded SMS and MMS conversations. There’s also a Message Reader app, which will do text-to-speech from your inbox. With the right capacitive stylus (not included) you can also use handwriting recognition, though we don’t imagine many will opt for that over the physical keyboard. Finally, there’s VPN support for those needing to access private networks, and a SIP client that tightly integrates VoIP services into the native contacts app.

Camera

Nokia has built a reputation for high-quality cameras on its mobile devices, and the E7 follows some way in that tradition. As we said, the limitations of space mean the 8-megapixels have to make do with EDoF rather than true auto-focus, and a dual-LED flash rather than Xenon. Still, it does mean you can use the LEDs as a video light, and the E7 will shoot 720p HD clips at 25fps that can then be easily played back via the HDMI port. A second, VGA-resolution camera on the front is intended for video calls, but can also be used to shoot grainy stills.

The end result is similar to what we saw on the C7: decent general scenes, but a real struggle with macro and close-up shots. The EDoF system simply can’t handle getting up too close, as you can see in the macro sample in the gallery. Otherwise it’s a good showing, with accurate colors and crisp edges. The speed between shots is also impressively fast. It’s worth noting that it was a grey and dreary day when we took the sample shots, which the E7 still managed to make the best of.

Video, meanwhile, only really smears during the fastest pans, and the quality is solid for 720p HD on a cellphone. Detail can be prone to blurring at times, however. You can see a sample clip below. Being able to hook up an HDTV via HDMI (as long as you’ve remembered the adapter cable) is useful, and quality is solid.

Phone and Battery

On another device we’d save some serious words of criticism for a sealed-in battery, but the E7’s frugal CPU actually leaves the smartphone capable of a couple of days’ use from a single charge. Impressive stuff, given the size of the display and the fact that we had Gmail regularly checking throughout. On the flip side, we didn’t reach for the E7 to generally play with apps and the internet as much as we find ourselves doing with, say, an Android device, so that somewhat reduced use needs to be accounted for too.

Phone performance is solid, as we’ve come to expect from Nokia, though the absence of the camera hump meant that the speakerphone sounded a little more muted than on the N8. It’s possible to set the E7 to automatically kick into speakerphone mode when the display-slide is opened.

Wrap-Up

There are several reasons for which we want to love the Nokia E7. The physical design is cleaner than the N8, build quality puts rival handsets from Samsung and LG to shame, the physical keyboard could give RIM nightmares and, mediocre display resolution aside, Nokia’s hardware spec sheet is bulging with everything the smartphone needs to be taken seriously. Even the relatively underpowered CPU makes sense when you look at battery life and the moderate demands Symbian makes of it.

Unfortunately, as with the N8 and C7, solid, beautiful hardware isn’t sufficient in today’s smartphone market. Symbian remains the sticking point for us and for many users; serviceable, but lacking the flare, ambition and ease of use of rival platforms. Yes, it can be coaxed into doing much of what the majority of us expect from a high-end device, but it feels workmanlike where now we expect magical.

If the Nokia E7 was running Android, or Windows Phone 7, it would undoubtedly be a best-seller. Nokia’s quality design and construction are rightly admired, and for text entry the E7’s physical keyboard is superb. Where the original Nokia Communicators drove innovation in the mobile segment, however, blurring the lines between phone and computer, the E7 falls short. Symbian fans will love it, but the E7 won’t open up the market any more than the N8 and C7 before it.


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77 Responses to Nokia E7 Review

  1. Arrgghhhhhh.

    Chris, cant you guys consider Symbian for what it is for a change ? Why the constant comparison with cosmetics while conveniently ignoring Symbian’s noted strengths?. How about features, multitasking, battery efficiency, telephony etc in which its ahead of the ‘magical’ Android and iOS ?. Since when did transitions and dancing wallpapers become the yardstick by which computing is measured ?.

    I have an Android device but I choose my Nokia 5800XM Symbian phone all the time due to better phone call quality, brilliant sound, camera and thanks to support for one handed use and yes, potrait T9 keyboard, is faster to text with.

    You guys foolishly continue to judge a book by its cover, I bet you only read books with pictures in them. Its a shame that Elop is now shroud waving thanks to silly reviews such as yours.

    You make me SICK.

    • Well, I did praise the E7 for its battery, telephony, camera, and plenty of other aspects. And, as I said, if you’re a Symbian person you’ll love it. However, up against rival platforms Symbian doesn’t shine enough, in my opinion (and the opinion of plenty of other people). I’m not talking about transitions and dancing wallpapers – though the incoming Symbian UI refresh is much needed, again in my opinion – but in app selection, intuitive ease of use, plenty of other things.

      We compare with other platforms because that’s what consumers are doing: they’re putting the E7 up against the best from Android, Apple and others. I’m happy you love Symbian, and you’re certainly not alone in that, but the platform growth figures suggest that rivals to Nokia are overtaking it in appeal. If you want to call what Elop is considering “shroud waving” then so be it; I’d say he’s more likely responding to a huge shift in the smartphone ecosystem.

      • There you go again with ‘shine’. Which do you prefer, a smartphone that shines but soon runs out of battery and when not dropping calls, produces sub-par telephony experience (tinny sound etc).

        Have you had a look at Symbian themes ? With themes you can make Symbian shine in various ways. Have you considered profiles ? With Symbian Situations app, you can configure your profile to change auto-magically when you get to a pre specified location or switch to silent mode once a meeting in your calendar begins. Is this not magical ?. What do you think of E7’s multi tasking ability compared to Android and iOS which cant pull it off despite their much heralded hardware oomph? Is eye candy to be preferred over productivity, is it ?.

        Yes the UI refresh will certainly help but what we have today is more important than any UI refresh and should not be overlooked due to a lust for the ephemeral eye candy.

        I did go overboard with my criticism though as you are more reasonable than most of the more rabid antagonistic/hostile reviewers in the tech blogosphere. Apologies.

        • A smartphone with prehistoric internet functionality cannot be lauded for it’s battery life, multitasking, telephony and other build quality aspects. The main reason I use mine is mobile web, a cheap featurephone can cover everything else you mentioned nowadays. I was really hoping Nokia would get out of this mess by now because they are our only hope for a proper open source linux mobile device; android is far from it, but so is symbian…

        • The browser does what it needs to but a little slow in doing it. The N8 and E7 have loads of technology, not just great cameras, inside them. More than any other ‘smartphone’. I think that Elop is making a huge mistake with Windows phone as it is very immature. Goes to prove that looks ARE everything when it comes to a mobile OS, not function.

        • Who uses a smartphone mainly for telephony? It’s mainly for internet use and media applications.

          If you want pure telephony, I hear the Nokia S40 phones are rock solid.

      • There you go again with ‘shine’. Which do you prefer, a smartphone that shines but soon runs out of battery and when not dropping calls, produces sub-par telephony experience (tinny sound etc).

        Have you had a look at Symbian themes ? With themes you can make Symbian shine in various ways. Have you considered profiles ? With Symbian Situations app, you can configure your profile to change auto-magically when you get to a pre specified location or switch to silent mode once a meeting in your calendar begins. Is this not magical ?. What do you think of E7’s multi tasking ability compared to Android and iOS which cant pull it off despite their much heralded hardware oomph? Is eye candy to be preferred over productivity, is it ?.

        Yes the UI refresh will certainly help but what we have today is more important than any UI refresh and should not be overlooked due to a lust for the ephemeral eye candy.

        I did go overboard with my criticism though as you are more reasonable than most of the more rabid antagonistic/hostile reviewers in the tech blogosphere. Apologies.

      • hi chris, I quite aggree with you regarding what you said in your response above. where i slightly disaggree with you is where you talk about consumers comparing platform before making a buying decision. I beleive that most companies use the “oldnew” referal marketing to make their move in the industry. We all know that is what RIM has done since 2004, using one selling point )(BBM) in order to grab market share and hoping that will spread like viral email therefore acquiring more prospects.

        I just beleive Nokia does not have an issue with its firmware, because currently the talkiing point has been with nokia alledgedly lloking to use Windows or android on its devices. but I think the contrary should the way to got the finnish brand. You will agree with me that Symbian is a very reliable platform (serciceability). the only is for nokia to innovate on that front instead of considering blindly what the competitors do that can affect their offerings. they should instead work closely with developpers and make sure there is a complete revamp of the ovi store. Availability has also be a big problem from nokia. Delays do not help and apps available in some countries and not in others its a big drawback for customers.

        lastly coming back to the E7, I shall get this phone as soon as is available in france, your review relly impressed me compare to the one on GSMarena. I just beleive that many people had been waiting for such a all in one business phone, however like i always say to many people “I’v used Nokia for more than a decade now and i always consider the durabiliy of nything i buy and thats what nokia is all about getting to the point; but Nokia Eseries should not be compare to phones that do not serve its purposes. The E7 is a pure Business Phone breed and does not lay around with imagery, instead it optimises the business person mobility to the fullest and guess what It works for me and for many people out there.
        I’m not going to lie chris I’m a firm believer of simplicity and the E7 is just that.

    • If I could buy this right now, I would.

      Can’t wait til they start hitting the usual online channels for purchase…Shit I’d pay $700 if I could have this by Monday next week, but everyone’s pre orders seem to not have an ETA attached to them, so I’m patiently waiting…and with MWC coming and the Nokia Announcement tomorrow, it doesn’t look like I’m gonna buy this phone…

      even though I really want one.

  2. I really love the hardware, design and build quality of this device. I just hope that they can bring this level of competency and quality their Windows phones.

  3. I really love the hardware, design and build quality of this device. I just hope that they can bring this level of competency and quality their Windows phones.

  4. I preordered this before Christmas. Canceled it after the black Friday remarks by Elop. Spent the following weekend and a good part of this week listening carefully to everything Nokia had to say about Symbian support in the future and the switch to WP. Also reading up on competing devices like the HTC Pro 7 and the rumors off a new iPhone5 with a keyboard. Today I finally got a chance to try the E7 hands on and I was not disappointed! Or to use a less Finnish way of putting it: I was seriously impressed. The phone is everything I hoped it would be slim, sturdy and very quick on its feet. So I’m happy to say I’ve now put the order back in :)

    Nokia has renewed their promise to roll out significant updates for these devices and continue to support them for at least for a few years to come. The first Nokia WP phone look set to hit a different market segment than the business oriented E7, so they won’t perhaps interest me. WP also needs to mature quite a bit before it will truly tempt me. So in buying this I should be able to happily wait for a WP-based replacement sometime in 2012 or thereafter.

  5. Hi everyone.

    Chris,I thought the review was very good and fair. It helped a great deal. There arent really a lot out there for the E7 even though it has been released.

    I’ve tried pretty much every os going. I’ve had the iphone, blackberry storm, nokia e90, nokia n95, htc desire,desire z,desire hd, windows htc hd7 and a few others and have to say that my symbian phones have always been the most reliable to date for call quality, battery life and apps that just work as they should (I know nokia forums can say otherwise lol)

    I am currently the owner of a google nexus one and a htc legend. Both great phones in their own right with amazing looking hardware and a pretty good os to boot as well. The app store and update process is seamless. However they both lack in the core functions of a phone ie call quality (for me anyway lol). All of the OS’s have their advantages and disadvantages, strengths and weaknesses but its not until you try them that you find one that you like.

    I too have been reading all the reviews on the net, youtube and have been looking at the sheer processing power of the next generation of phones coming to market (WMC). Quite a few of the handsets are true monsters in their own right.

    I took the plunge and have actually placed an order for the E7 which fingers crossed should be with me very shortly. Received confirmation it was going out today!!! Cant wait. I asked myself why i would want one and the following came up:

    1.If i want to take good photos i can use my DSLR camera or my sony compact. (nothing beats the
    real thing just yet and each gadget has a purpose. Bought them so dont want to put them out to
    pasture just yet).
    2.If i want to create documents, store music and photos i have my laptop but may also want a
    keyboard on the go to edit for work.
    3.My music collection currently spans approx 125GB. I at present only really listen to about 5
    albums worth of music from it. The USB on the go feature would work a treat as can keep movies on
    a seperate drive leaving important space for pics and music with odd videos and importantly maps
    and apps. Can also output video vai hdmi. good enough for me.
    3.My web surfing is mainly done on my commute to work and back and to be honest pinching to
    zoom isnt too big a deal. If you think about the resolution of laptops and pc monitors when they first
    came out. We still worked on them (not saying i’m that old lol, i’m quite young but love my gadgets
    esp phones). Train lines always disrupt my signal so its not too much of a problem. Theres always
    opera mobile mini for those periods of travel!! and wifi at home and work.
    4. My nokia phones have always been the most robust and actually make good phone calls. That to
    me sells the phone straight away. The amount of times my blackberry couldnt hold a signal to keep
    its “always on” email “on” was frustrating beyond belief lol. Vodafone UK coverage is pretty solid.
    Have just been waiting for a phone which could make good phone calls. Hopefully this is it.
    5. Why not an N8? All the above minus points 2, 3 & 4 lol.

    In all honesty the menu system does look a little dated. I have been looking around on all the forums for hints and tips before considering purchasing and have found that theres always a little tweak here or there which can make it a much nicer experience. I think with all these os’s its about making the phone your own. I’ve had a look at ovi store as well. Have to say app wise its hard to navigate but the core apps are all there and that pretty much sealed my decision.

    Hopefully nokia will continue to update the symbian experience as has been mentioned. People may say the hardware is outdated but i personally think its the apps and os which make the expereince. My HTC legend is just as smooth as my previous htc desire Hd, all that took was a firmware update and then i couldn’t notice a difference bar the real estate of the screen and hence the desire hd had to go.

    I really hope nokia dont give up on symbian 3 just yet. A few fireware updates and im sure the experience will be pretty smooth and on par with may of the big boys. The raw power is still there, its just not been fully tapped into yet. Its no good having all that grunt and a crap os. The iphone isnt spectacularly powerful compared to its rivals but you wouldnt guess by the smoothness of the os.

    i’ve bought the handset now. nokia if you read these posts. Keep with the updates!!

    • good points! I really dont know if people actually roam aroudn with tech specs and how good their specs are as compared to others or dfo they actually work with the cell phones. because if one were to work on the symbian 3 its not that bad. sure you’ll miss a ton of apps that’s not in android or the ios. but most of the apps are well ‘crapps’! for a business point of view where im sore with nokia is the edof 8mp cams. they should have gone with a 5mp cam with autofocus – because scanning on the go is SO important! the hdmi out and usb otg are useful features, same with the high speed built in storage from toshiba – most of the times the built storage is crap.

      the fix for symbian 3 is that they should update it frequently, once a month or so, and change the impression from being a lumbering software company like MS. that can change the outlook to a great extent. the E7 is not a bad phone at all! in fact it compares very well with a lot of other top notch phones. the only trouble would be to stay current at the end of this year, when the dual core chips would come in when the performance will really be high. so nokia has until that time to really make a lot of amends with regards to software. at least 15 good apps should be given away free – like gravity for ex. that’ll make a huge impact.

  6. Yet another peice of crap from Nokia. They moan about how hard it is for them, but what do they expect when they release such crap, dated products. Symbian is a rubbish, boring, clunky and unintuitive operating system, the processor and RAM are pathetic, and the screen resolution is terrible for a 4 inch display. Idiots -.-

    • dude stfu!
      you’re a loser and you wont get a phone with such awesome build, and it has the best screen.
      Yes, I said THE BEST!

      • LMFAO BEST SCREEN MY ASS. It doesn’t even come CLOSE to SuperAMOLED Plus which wipes the floor with any screen on the market. nHD resolution IS awful for a 4″ screen. The build is brilliant, and the design stunning, but what is the point of that when it is powered by shit hardware, running shit software? You are just too deluded to realise this is a crap device compared to it’s competitors.

  7. I love it. Its the prettiest most solid quality phone I have seen in the consumer range. ( For real luxury check vertu.com which is the super high luxury division of Nokia. I have had Nokias all my life and as a principle ( I am a Microsoft hater) I would never buy anything Microsoft. Thus Windows Phone 7 is a no no . All other Android phones that I saw until now feel in the hand like cheap plastic and I don’t really need one million applications nor super fast processors that will drain your battery in 3 times. The only drawback for me is the price. It is pricey !!

  8. There’s nothing better that had hit the market till Date like a N6600, which could really do magic with all those apps available 8 years ago.
    Not even one of today’s phones can match its quality, design, features and functionality.
    Just a moment of re-concilliation will prove the above fact.
    I have arrived at the above decision, after having used a 127 phones till date, of almost all major manu’s. Not a N8 or a Omnia or a Android or Apple can still be compared to the 6600.
    If Nokia, re-launched a N6600 on a S60 Platform with the a better screen clarity and size and just a dedicated Voice Processor for better music, bet on it, It will rule the market for another 8 years.

  9. After going around a few of my local cell phone stores I noticed that for some reason the non-working samples of the E7 (that is the dummy devices without any electronics in them) seem to have a much lower quality hinge mechanism and keyboard than the real devices. The hinge mechanism on the dummy device is NOTHING like the real thing – it looks the same, but is horrible in action (you have to rip the screen open). Same goes for the dead rubbery keyboard on the dummy device. Having a prop like that to try and sell your device is just mad (and someone at Nokia should be told off for making such a mistake). But luckily the real thing is quite different :)

    I guess this might not matter anymore as many stores will probably have fully working samples of the E7 by now, but I just thought I’d post this in case someone was baffled by the discrepancy between the good reviews and the way a demo device felt.

  10. After going around a few of my local cell phone stores I noticed that for some reason the non-working samples of the E7 (that is the dummy devices without any electronics in them) seem to have a much lower quality hinge mechanism and keyboard than the real devices. The hinge mechanism on the dummy device is NOTHING like the real thing – it looks the same, but is horrible in action (you have to rip the screen open). Same goes for the dead rubbery keyboard on the dummy device. Having a prop like that to try and sell your device is just mad (and someone at Nokia should be told off for making such a mistake). But luckily the real thing is quite different :)

    I guess this might not matter anymore as many stores will probably have fully working samples of the E7 by now, but I just thought I’d post this in case someone was baffled by the discrepancy between the good reviews and the way a demo device felt.

  11. After going around a few of my local cell phone stores I noticed that for some reason the non-working samples of the E7 (that is the dummy devices without any electronics in them) seem to have a much lower quality hinge mechanism and keyboard than the real devices. The hinge mechanism on the dummy device is NOTHING like the real thing – it looks the same, but is horrible in action (you have to rip the screen open). Same goes for the dead rubbery keyboard on the dummy device. Having a prop like that to try and sell your device is just mad (and someone at Nokia should be told off for making such a mistake). But luckily the real thing is quite different :)

    I guess this might not matter anymore as many stores will probably have fully working samples of the E7 by now, but I just thought I’d post this in case someone was baffled by the discrepancy between the good reviews and the way a demo device felt.

  12. I purchased E7 last week, and I am very happy with it. All other rivals with qwerty keyboard feels plastic toys, please try it yourself! Handy, light, but strong enough. About symbian: What’s wrong about it? It is ok. at least for me, but if you do like more icon based layout, you can install e.x. n desk from ovi -store, and all are programs are displayed as icons (like in neighbor girl IPhone)….

  13. Finally received my E7 through the mail today! Have to say it has lived upto my expectations. Build quality is amazing. Definitely the best qwerty/phone quality i have ever had.

    The phone really is more compact than the comparison pictures would have you believe. Had it in my pocket for the whole day and cant say i noticed it anymore than i would have my nexus one. The keyboard has a really solid feel to it not only in terms of opening/closing but also typing.

    The screen is great. I miss the higher resolution mainly with web browsing but the games installed, viewing photos and batman the movie look really good. Not tested music quality as yet but dont think i will be disappointed. If you switch off the theme setting , switching between the homescreens is incredibly quick. I personally am struggling to fill 2 so removed one as well.

    If you want a phone which can actually hold a conversation where no other phones can, then this is the phone for you. I work in an office in the lower ground level of a shopping mall and i can still get signal. Before i’d be walking upstairs to grab a bar of signal lol.

    Contacts, email and calender synced seamlessly with exchange mail with my google account. I was a little dubious having read the forums for n8 owners but thankfully it wasnt the case for me.

    Finally the battery life. It arrived at 7:30am with approximately 40% charge this morning and even after messing around with it for the whole day i’ve only just put it on for charge. Havent been able to do that since i last had a symbian phone approx 7-8years ago.

    I personally cant wait for future updates. The web browser is the main weakest link. The camera is passable but i wouldnt expect miracles from it. I find the images indoors look a little washed out and the flash isnt strong enough but i can live with that lol. Opera mini is probably the best for me at the moment as it if a lot faster compared to the stock browser.

    Navigating symbian is pretty easy. Not used it for a while and having read previous reviews was expecting the worst. however, everything is in logical order. Granting having greater customisation of widgets on homescreens would be nicer but i created a fair few folders and devided apps into where i wanted them to be and love the set up at present. I find Symbian to be very versatile.

    I didnt think i’d be going back to symbian so soon but am happy with my purchase and glad i took the plunge. the phone feels like its built to last so hopefully instead of upgrading my phone in the near future i’ll be downgrading my data plan lol

    • Hi Mits, thank you for your feedback of the phone, i have ordered this and next week im getting it hopefully. One quick question, since you have the phone and you have used it pretty much of all the features it has, does it have a FM transmitter? coz some reviews i’ve read says it doesn’t, and some says it does. On youtube i’ve seen a promotional copy of the E7 phone which has FM transmitter. I would greatly appreciate your reply on this. please send me a reply to arnorld_1999@yahoo.com

      • Hi there,

        The E7 does not have an FM transmitter i’m afraid. Also something to note which i found out is not all E7’s have a smart dialler function depending on where the phone is from. I had to install SPB mobile shell on the top to allow me to have this function but its made a great phone even better for me. Nokia are aware of this on their forum and will hopefully issue a patch.
        I havent experienced any slowdowns, freezing or crashes at all. So so far so good a solid phone if that helps. GPS pick up for me is amazing especially with the sports tracker app for running and music qualtiy is pretty good to boot too.

        Hope this helps.

    • Hi. Good review. I checked the E7 out in a store today for about 30 mins and found it great – makes me agree with your views. I love the HDMI output and the ability to connect a pen drive which a lot of other smart phones i have been checking out on lately dont have. What point a biz phone that doesnt take care of all this.

      I have 2 Qs

      1) can the E7 let you print office documents – ppts or worksheets and emails directly – i.e. thru a USB connection to a normal printer – HP/Cannon etc?

      2) does the E7 have an ebook or equivalent app?

      If the ans to the above is a yes and yes, I am buying it w/o waiting for the price to drop. Particularly interested in the ans to Q1

      Thanks!!

    • Hi. Good review. I checked the E7 out in a store today for about 30 mins and found it great – makes me agree with your views. I love the HDMI output and the ability to connect a pen drive which a lot of other smart phones i have been checking out on lately dont have. What point a biz phone that doesnt take care of all this.

      I have 2 Qs

      1) can the E7 let you print office documents – ppts or worksheets and emails directly – i.e. thru a USB connection to a normal printer – HP/Cannon etc?

      2) does the E7 have an ebook or equivalent app?

      If the ans to the above is a yes and yes, I am buying it w/o waiting for the price to drop. Particularly interested in the ans to Q1

      Thanks!!

  14. I think you gave a fair review, but sadly, missed the strength of Symbian, and by comparing it with Windows phone 7, ,actually made me wonder if you you really are as aware.

    True, the touch, and overall user experience may be a bit “uncool”, as compared to the iPhone (and all its clones, such as Android, and the recent Windows Phone 7). But under the layer of interface is the real OS. And thats where the real, measurable, definable difference lyes.
    The ability to install apps from anywhere (A web page, an installable file, besides the Ovi Store)
    The ability to view and manage files through a file manager (not there in Iphone), and even attach SD cards and a pen drive ((again not there in any other device), and view their content in the file manager, does bring it a whole lot closer to a computer, than does any other platform, where all you do is swipe, pinch to zoom!!
    The ability to place multiple wall papers on different home screens (not possible on either Iphone, Android, and definitely not on Windows!)
    The ability to download files from within the browser to a location on the phone/SD card/Pen drive. iPhone doesnt even let you download from a browser.
    And finally, the ability to connect the phone to a TV, where in you get the entire phone’s interface on the TV screen, through a regular AV cable or HDMI. Instead of a USD 50 proprietory cable to get the iphone to even look at a TV!

    So Id say on the contrary, where Symbian devices are open, and let you do a whole lot, on others such as iPhone you need to do most of the things through round about methods.
    here’s a classic example:
    Imagine you took a picture from your Canon, and wanted to mail it to say your friend. True, you’d put the camera’s SD card into your lap top, and attach the pic to a mail, and send it. But hang on, if most smart phones are “closer to a computer”, then shouldnt you be able to do it using them?? Instead of taking the pain of turning on a computer just for this one thing.

    This would let you do it. But the iPhone doesnt even have a reader.

    So, I’d say th next time you review a device, please do so more comprehensively, instead through the prejudiced anti Symbian POV.
    Every platform has its strengths. The iPhone has its (and we all know that). And so does Symbian. If there is one thing I love about it, it is its openness. And you mentoned the apps, just check out the number of reviews on any particular app on OVI store and you’d realise the number of downloads they have. I have yet to find an app I use on my iphone that isnt there. Conversely, there are quite a few on SYmbian that are not there for either iPhone or Android: Micosoft office Communicator is one example.

    • Good review! Some ppl are just too into i-stuffs and android. 1 more thing to add, not all OSses need 1ghz to run smootly. what’s the use of a smartphone if it doesn’t even last you for 1 day of heavy use?

  15. And I forgot one more strength:
    Multitasking: Symbian has, since time memorable, been suppoting multi tasking. even normal phones running Symbian supported it. And we never had “battery issues.
    And here, you have another first: It shows prreviews of open aapps. Not there in iPhone, not there in Android. Sad you didnt even notice it (or find it worth mentioning). I thought thats pretty cool too.

  16. I’m sorry, but a single core 1GHz Cortex A8 processor and 512mb of RAM is NOT too much to ask for, since we’ve had it in phones since the beginning of 2010!!! The display should have also had a qHD resolution, and why the f*ck would Nokia ADD LAG?!!!! WHAT IS THE POINT? ARE THEY STUPID?

    • Symbian OS is very efficient, It doesn’t need 1Ghz to run as smooth as the others do because its so well optimized. The screen resolution I agree on though.

  17. I’m sorry, but a single core 1GHz Cortex A8 processor and 512mb of RAM is NOT too much to ask for, since we’ve had it in phones since the beginning of 2010!!! The display should have also had a qHD resolution, and why the f*ck would Nokia ADD LAG?!!!! WHAT IS THE POINT? ARE THEY STUPID?

  18. The Nokia E7 is a beautifully designed, solidly build phone. I loved its stylish sliding mechanism and its display sits. The E7 uses the brand new symbian 3 OS which has struggled to make the transition from the other Nokia phones to its new role running touchscreen mobiles, but the Symbian still has some things to do if it wants to catch up with the competition. The apps main menu is presented in simple grid format but a few apps were very slow and short on features. All I can say is that it is not fulfilling the expectations.

  19. recently i have buy the Nokia E7 i feel that it is one of the most precious phone. nokia E7 is best phone and good design i love them all about its latest feature of nokia phones.

  20. Funny, I have never read a review of an Android phone that mentioned Nokia or Symbian, but this article kept mentioning Android. Why is that?

  21. After trusting Nokia’s E series for many years I totally lost faith due to the E7. It is unable to stand normal airconditioning use. At least that is what Nokia tells me and they are unwilling to repair in under the warranty. As a faithful user of the E-series my previous E50, E60, E75 all worked perfectly inder these circumstances. The E7 fails to charge within two month. I’m back to my E75 now and lokking for another brand. Sorry Nokia Your E7 is a total waste of a lot of money.

  22. i have one NOKIA E7, but when i exchanged  by bluetooth, some data with NOKIA N8, i lost all my data even phone images, how ican restore it?

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