Nima can test food for gluten on the go in just 2 minutes

JC Torres - Mar 21, 2016
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Nima can test food for gluten on the go in just 2 minutes

Most people probably take it for granted that a portion of the population can’t enjoy all the food we usually eat, either because of allergies or other reasons. Gluten has become one of those most problematic of substances because it is found in a very wide range of ingredients and prepared meals. Making sure food is gluten-free has become an ordeal for those who have celiac disease or similar conditions. That no longer need to be true with Nima, an extremely portable device that can check food for gluten in just 2 minutes.

Considering a traditional lab test usually takes around 15 minutes, that’s definitely a huge time saver. Not to mention you actually can’t bring a whole lab with you. The Nima, on the other hand, you can slip inside something as small as a hand bag. Developed by 65Sensor Lab, Nima was designed to take the drudgery and the fear or dining out.

Using the device is quite simple too. Simply drop in a piece food into the single use capsule and screw the cap on. That action also grinds up the food inside and releases a solution to extract protein. Inserting the capsule inside Nima itself triggers chemicals that reacts to gluten. The amount of gluten is then “recorded” on a strip of paper that Nima analyzes and translates into a smile or a frown, indicating if the food is safely gluten-free or not.

Nima is in pre-order stage right now and the device itself costs $199. However, users will also have to sign up for a subscription that will give them a supply of 12 capsules, delivered on a bi-weekly, monthly, or bi-monthly periods. Since you need to discard each capsule after use, that might eventually add up.

Like any such device these days, Nima also connects to a mobile app. Aside from recording your own test results, you can also upload and share them with others, leaving comments regarding certain foods or restaurants. This way, it will be easier for gluten-conscious eaters to find safe places to eat.

SOURCE: Nima
VIA: IEEE Spectrum


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