Motorola dismisses Razr fold test controversy: Official response

Brittany A. Roston - Feb 7, 2020, 7:38 pm CST
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Motorola dismisses Razr fold test controversy: Official response

As it did with the Galaxy Fold, CNET recently conducted a folding test with the Motorola Razr, a recently announced clamshell-style folding smartphone that features a flexible display and hinge. Unlike the Galaxy Fold, Motorola’s new handset only lasted for 27,000 folds before the hinge could no longer close. Now the company has responded and it isn’t worried about the results.

READ: Motorola Razr gives up after being folded 27,000 times

At 27,000 folds, the Motorola Razr would last for around one year of use. However, Motorola says the machine that was used to test the hinge mechanism wasn’t designed to do so properly, the result being stress on the phone that wouldn’t be applied through regular human use. As a consequence of this, the company says, the hinge failed earlier than expected.

In case you missed the video the first time around, it can be found below. The interesting part, as you’d expect, happens toward the end of the video when the phone stops closing properly:

In a statement to SlashGear, Motorola explained:

razr is a unique smartphone, featuring a dynamic clamshell folding system unlike any device on the market. SquareTrade’s FoldBot is simply not designed to test our device. Therefore, any tests run utilizing this machine will put undue stress on the hinge and not allow the phone to open and close as intended, making the test inaccurate. The important thing to remember is that razr underwent extensive cycle endurance testing during product development, and CNET’s test is not indicative of what consumers will experience when using razr in the real-world. We have every confidence in the durability of razr.

You can see an example of the official hinge-testing mechanism used by Motorola to stress test the phone in the video below. Though the phones snap open and closed, the entire process is slower and more gentle than CNET’s test — whether consumers will be similarly gentle is up for debate. Regardless, Motorola is confident that its folding phone can ‘last years.’


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