Minecraft is a rare game that never stops growing

Eric Abent - Sep 16, 2019, 10:37 am CDT
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Minecraft is a rare game that never stops growing

These days, Fortnite tends to dominate discussions about the most popular games around, but even it has some competition in that space. As Fortnite has enjoyed its meteoric rise, Minecraft has been silently amassing even more players, and now – not long after the game celebrated its 10th birthday – its player base is truly massive.

How massive is it? In an interview with Business Insider, Microsoft revealed that the game now has 112 million monthly active players. Keep in mind that this isn’t just the number of people who have played the game at some point over the last 10 years, but rather people who are playing at least once per month.

Those are figures that any game would love to have. While Minecraft may not get as much attention as it once did, its growth doesn’t seem to have slowed down. In fact, Minecraft has added around 20 million players since our last check in on the state of the game back in October 2018, with Microsoft telling Business Insider that it has continued to grow in the five years since the company acquired Mojang, the developer behind Minecraft.

Of course, Microsoft’s efforts in bringing the game to as many platforms as possible hasn’t hurt when it comes to claiming this crown. Microsoft currently offers Minecraft on a wide variety of platforms – PC, all current-generation consoles, and mobile devices as well. It also offers Minecraft through its Xbox Game Pass subscription service and makes an education-focused edition of the game for use in schools.

In short, if you want to play Minecraft, there’s probably a way for you to do so regardless of the gaming hardware you own, which is probably why it has found enduring popularity. It could even grow bigger from here, with the incoming augmented reality game Minecraft Earth potentially renewing interest in Minecraft proper for a lot of lapsed players. We’ll see if Minecraft can continue climbing higher, but at the moment, it seems unstoppable.


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