March Through Time Fortnite event revisits the life of Martin Luther King

Eric Abent - Aug 26, 2021, 12:21pm CDT
March Through Time Fortnite event revisits the life of Martin Luther King

Fortnite has been home to many events throughout its history, but today, we learned of what is perhaps the most interesting event yet. Epic Games teamed up with Time Magazine to create an interactive experience highlighting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his efforts with the civil rights movement within Fortnite. Dubbed March Through Time, the experience will be going live in Fortnite Creative.

At first blush, it might seem weird to host an interactive experience about the civil rights movement and the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. in Fortnite, but this could also be a good way to get Fortnite‘s player base engaged with the subject matter. As you might imagine, there will be no gunplay or building in the March Through Time mode, as players will instead be transported to “DC 63,” an in-game snapshot of Washington DC as it existed during the March on Washington in 1963.

It’s during the March on Washington that Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his historic 17-minute “I Have a Dream” speech. Players will be able to visit both the Lincoln Memorial and the United States National Mall and participate in activities and mini-game quests as they make their way through the experience.

While this is quite the departure for a game like Fortnite, there are still some challenges to complete. Finishing them will net players the DC 63 spray for use in-game, but that seems to be the only unlockable associated with this event. The in-game reimagining of Washington DC was crafted by Fortnite players ChaseJackman, GQuanoe, XWDFr, and YU7A.

We’re not sure how long the March Through Time event will be live in Fortnite, so be sure to check it out while you can. It’ll be interesting to see if Epic Games hosts more educational events like this in the future because it’s hard to deny the positive effect a game as popular as Fortnite could have when it comes to teaching history.


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