MacBook Pro pre-orders might not ship until December at the latest

Ewdison Then - Oct 24, 2021, 11:11pm CDT
MacBook Pro pre-orders might not ship until December at the latest

Apple definitely dropped a bombshell in its “Unleashed” event last week. In addition to delivering on the expected upgrades and changes that had MacBook Pro fans excited, it unveiled a new screen design that has everyone talking like notches were new all over again. Those elements may have helped buyers bite into getting a new MacBook Pro early, but, unfortunately, even the earliest birds might not see their worm delivered to them until November or, worse, December.

There are many things going for the 2021 MacBook Pro, so it’s no surprise there is quite a number that will be interested in it. In addition to finally returning what fans have been asking for, like the return of old port selections and the removal of the Touch Bar, it also added a few new things to the formula. More than just the new Apple M1 Pro and M1 Max Silicon, it also added a notch to give users a bit more screen real estate.

Unfortunately, Apple might be unable to sufficiently supply that demand. The mobile and computing industries continue to face component supply shortages, a situation that might not ease up until the next year or two. While things have been relatively fine in the past few months, it seems that reality will be catching up to Apple as well.

According to AppleInsider, shipping dates for all models of the MacBook Pros have been pushed back, even for those who ordered as early as October 18. Those that pre-ordered the default configuration for the 14-inch MacBook Pro have seen shipping dates between November 16 and November 23. The default 16-inch MacBook Pro, on the other hand, might ship sometime between November 23 and December 1.

The situation with customized configurations, however, is worse, with the latest dates slipping to December 16. The adjustment of shipping dates seems to affect all markets, not just the US, confirming that this may indeed be due to the global semiconductor problem. Unfortunately, it couldn’t have come at a worse time, as many industries try to prepare for the annual shopping season starting next month.


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