LEGO Braille Bricks are awesome and not for the public

Chris Burns - Aug 20, 2020, 4:25pm CDT
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LEGO Braille Bricks are awesome and not for the public

LEGO Braille Bricks were revealed by LEGO as a “pioneering project that will help children with blindness or visual impairment learn Braille in a playful and engaging way.” This system is created with LEGO bricks made with the same materials as standard LEGO bricks, but made specifically to assist in learning and developing an understanding of Braille and associated systems.

The LEGO Braille Bricks system is delivered with a toolkit. Each toolkit contains LEGO Braille Bricks formed and printed upon specifically for the purpose of said kit. Each brick has its own symbol or letter associated with the physical form of the brick’s pegs.

Above you’ll get some idea of how this system of interlocking bricks works. It’s not like they’ve just printed dots on already-existing LEGO bricks. They’ve gone ahead and melded the already established systems of LEGO brick pegs and Braille dots to create a single, hopefully easy to understand and work with system.

At the LEGO Braille Bricks website you’ll find a wide variety of projects that can be initiated with the first LEGO Braille Bricks toolkit.

SIDENOTE: While the projects shown are specifically made for the Braille Bricks set, one could potentially use what’s shown to create new systems with bricks already in one’s own collection. Even if you’re not learning Braille, this website could help you think of new activities to do with your kids with LEGO bricks!

The LEGO Foundation and LEGO Group are both behind this project in which LEGO Braille Bricks will be offered to “select institutions, schools and services catering to the education of blind and visually impaired children.”

LEGO Braille Bricks will not be available to the public. The first toolkit for LEGO Braille Bricks will be available for professionals associated with or operating schools, institutions, education centers, etc, working to educate youngsters with blindness and visual impairment.


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