Galaxy Z Flip teardown reveals where the glass and bristles are

JC Torres - Feb 18, 2020, 7:16pm CST
Galaxy Z Flip teardown reveals where the glass and bristles are

Foldable devices are so new and so expensive that, despite companies’ assurances, there will always be fears that they will break at the slightest accident. The Galaxy Z Flip turned out to be a tough nut to crack but it also came short of Samsung’s advertised features. It may be begging for a lawsuit if that was indeed the case and JerryRigEverything dug in deeper to find out where marketing ends and reality begins.

Since the Galaxy Z Flip was already functionally unusable anyway, the YouTuber no longer took care to ensure that the phone would end up in one piece afterward. Accidentally cutting the screen’s cable pretty much also sealed the phone’s fate. Fortunately, Zack Nelson wasn’t afraid to break a few eggs, or in this case glass surfaces, to get to the truth of the matter.

It turns out, there is indeed an ultra-thin glass that sits on top of the flexible AMOLED panel. That, in turn, is covered by the same plastic-like protective layer found on the Galaxy Fold. Unfortunately, that protective layer is still integral to the screen’s operation yet is also still just as easily damaged. In short, the Galaxy Z Flip is only just a bit more durable and resilient than its larger predecessor.

The YouTuber also sought out the bristles that Samsung advertised to protect the phone from destructive dust. Yet again, the company may have oversold the idea since the bristles were found only at the two outer sides of the hinge. Admittedly, that’s also where minute particles are most likely to come in so it’s not ineffective either.

In short, Samsung wasn’t technically lying about the features and technologies it included in the Galaxy Z Flip. It just embellished and exaggerated the delivery to set up consumers’ expectations and perhaps their eventual disappointment. It should perhaps be called out for that but whether Samsung backs down from its marketing is highly unlikely.


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