Ferroflow – A Lava-lamp made with magnetizable liquid

Radhika Seth - Aug 24, 2015
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Ferroflow – A Lava-lamp made with magnetizable liquid

If we give you terms like Brownian motion, nano technology and ferromagnetic fluid, you’d probably brush them aside as complicated science terms, better kept under the lid. However, if we represent the same as this enigmatic creation by designer Matt Robinson, called the Ferroflow, hopefully we have intrigued your curiosity.

Being inquisitive is a good thing, especially in terms of science, because this has led to a lot more innovations for mankind. For example, the ferromagnetic fluid was a substance invented by NASA for their space research purposes back in 1960s. Today, we are seeing many young innovators take advantage of this technology to create game-changing interior lifestyle objects of art.

Ferroflow is not the first design-centric ferromagnetic fluid lamp to be created and it’s not the first one to go onto a crowd funding campaign, asking for your precious dollars. However, it does bear the distinction of being a more refined version in terms of looks, functionality and user interface. Switching it on is as easy as swiping or touching across the anodized aluminum surface of the lamp.

Once the micro controller comes to life, the rare earth magnets in the fluid get into motion and create enthralling patterns. Add to the fun by using your own personal magnets from the outside and swirl the internal particles to create distinct designs. In short, go crazy with creativity. Thankfully Robinson is using some cost-effective materials in his version, so that the eventual lamp is not too pricy as the current versions.

To brush your science, when solid particles are mixed with liquids, they tend to settle down, but in the case of this NASA invention, nano particles that are lesser than 10 nm, stay suspended in the liquid. Of course NASA had liquid rocket fuel and its purpose in mind, but today’s designers are using it to hypnotise us with ferromagnetic fluid lamps that create interesting patters and designs. And no, we refuse to call it the next lava lamp!


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