EPIX’s app allows downloading movies for offline viewing

JC Torres - Sep 16, 2015, 2:30am CDT
EPIX’s app allows downloading movies for offline viewing

EPIX has just recently parted ways with Netflix due to differences in vision. That vision is now taking the network directly to mobile, where it will practically be putting it at odds with Netflix agian. And probably with some EPIX’s new distribution partners as well. EPIX will soon be launching a mobile app that not only will give direct access to its long list of blockbuster films and comedy videos, but will also allow users to download that content on their device for watching later, even without an Internet connection.

This is in stark contrast to the model adopted by many content providers these days, who only allow for streaming content, effectively tethering people to their Internet connections even when on the go. Reasons for these vary, from trying to prevent piracy (which isn’t really that successful), to controlling bandwidth, to serving ads. Bottom line, services like Netflix prioritize control over the distribution of their content.

EPIX, on the other hand, has a different mission, embodied in its “TV Everywhere” campaign. It prides itself to be the first premium network to launch on current and previous gen consoles, as well as on Roku’s streaming devices. It doesn’t mind where or how you watch, as long as you’re watching its content. This philosophy didn’t sit well with Netflix, who preferred to have exclusive distribution right to content. As a result, Netflix no longer renewed its partnership with EPIX.

Later this month, EPIX will roll out its mobile app for iOS and Android, which will give subscribers the ability to download movie titles like the Hunger Games, James Bond, Star Trek, or music videos from Katie Perry, or comedy events from Craig Ferguson. Once downloaded, users will be able to watch any time, anywhere, whether there is a network connection or not. EPIX claims to be the first network to offer this kind of freedom though Google, who technically can’t be considered a network anyway, does allow for downloading videos.

SOURCE: EPIX


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