Craig Wright offers proof that he invented Bitcoin

Shane McGlaun - May 2, 2016, 4:30 am CDT
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Craig Wright offers proof that he invented Bitcoin

The first time we talked about a man called Craig Wright and his alleged ties to the cryptocurrency Bitcoin was in December 2015 when word surfaced that Australian police had raided a home that he and his wife had rented. Apparently, Wright and his wife had already moved and the raid reportedly had something to do with missed tax payments, not Bitcoin. Fast forward, several months and Wright has now publically identified himself as the creator of Bitcoin known as Satoshi Nakamoto.

Wright came forward with technical proof that he is in fact the creator of Bitcoin and that proof consisted of coins known to be owned by the creator of the cryptocurrency. Wright also has the support of prominent members of the Bitcoin community as well as members of the core development team to back up his claim. Wright identified himself to three different major media organizations including the BBC, the Economist, and GQ.

Wright was able to digitally sign messages using cryptographic keys created during the early days of Bitcoin development during his meeting with the BBC. The specific keys he used to sign those messages are linked directly to blocks of Bitcoins known to belong to Satoshi Nakamoto. Those same cryptographic keys were used to send 10 Bitcoins to Hal Finney, a cryptographer and one of the engineers who helped develop the Bitcoin protocol, back in 2009 in the first Bitcoin transaction.

Bitcoin Foundation chief scientist Gavin Andresen has stated that he believes Wrights claims stating, “During the London proof sessions, I had the opportunity to review the relevant data along three distinct lines: cryptographic, social, and technical.” He continued stating, “It is my firm belief that Craig Wright satisfies all three categories.” Wright’s admission confirms claims made by Wired and other publications in 2015 that he was a candidate for being the creator of Bitcoin.

SOURCE: BBC


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