The Ax falls on Fry’s Electronics after more than three decades

Shane McGlaun - Feb 24, 2021, 7:08am CST
The Ax falls on Fry’s Electronics after more than three decades

Fry’s Electronics is an electronics retailer that had been in business for 36 years with 31 locations in nine states. This week the company unceremoniously ended all operations and closed all of its stores around the country. The company website has also been closed and in place of the typical website is a simple text message.

The message states that after nearly 36 years in business, the company made the difficult decision to shut down operations and close its business permanently. As for why the electronics company ceased operations, it points the finger directly at challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic and changes in the retail industry. The message posted on the company website says it will implement the shutdown through an “orderly wind down process” that it believes will be in the best interest of the Company, its creditors, and stakeholders.

Operations at Fry’s Electronics ceased effective February 24, 2021, and the wind down process began on that date. Fry’s believes that the wind down process will reduce costs, avoid additional liabilities, minimize the impact on customers, vendors, landlords, and associates while maximizing the value of its remaining assets.

The company is in the process of reaching out to customers with repairs and consignment vendors to outline future steps. Anyone who has a pending repair with the company can get more information on the official Fry’s web page with phone numbers and email addresses listed near the page’s bottom.

The company does warn that they may be slow to respond to emails due to anticipated high volumes of questions. Fry’s Electronics was known for having stores that each had a theme. For instance, locations in the California Bay Area included one in Fremont that was themed on the 1893 Worlds Fair, a location in San Jose had a Mayan theme, while one in Sunnyvale was based on the history of Silicon Valley.


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