research

This is how future Surface tablets and pens should work

This is how future Surface tablets and pens should work

Microsoft's Surface tablets and its Surface Pen appealed to artists and creatives but it was lacking in one aspect that these class of people were used to. It left one hand, the non-pen hand, idle and practically useless. Microsoft addressed that with the Surface Dial, but it was yet another accessory that you could drop, break, or lose. Microsoft Researchers,however, have come up with ways to give that hand something to do, by allowing both pen and finger to be used as the same time, with the finger driving some special UI and actions at the side.

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Crayola announces crayon based on newly-discovered shade of blue

Crayola announces crayon based on newly-discovered shade of blue

Crayon company Crayola revealed back in March that it was retiring the long-running shade of yellow known as Dandelion. Now it has announced that the crayon will be replaced by a new addition to the blue family, and it's based on an entirely new pigment that was only discovered recently, dubbed "YInMn."

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Science says swearing makes you stronger and better able to handle pain

Science says swearing makes you stronger and better able to handle pain

If you've ever stubbed your toe, only to follow it with a string of expletives, you're likely aware of the cathartic effect such verbal spewing can bring. Previous research has found that swearing has a pain relief effect, though the precise reason for that is unclear, and now a new series of experiments have found that dirty language can also make you stronger. The increased strength effect was found during two experiments.

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NASA contest offers cash to anyone who boosts its simulation code

NASA contest offers cash to anyone who boosts its simulation code

NASA has another HeroX contest underway, one that will require interested participants to first sign an application and go through a government check. Those who make it through the process will get access to the space agency's FUN3D software, something that itself is used for 'solving nonlinear partial differential equations.' Why would NASA give you access to such software? So that you can optimize the code to make it run faster.

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This camera is so fast, it makes light stand still

This camera is so fast, it makes light stand still

Sony might boast of a 1,000 fps CMOS and Samsung might flaunt its 240 fps slo-mo on the Galaxy S8. Neither, however, has anything on this camera that could probably even catch The Flash in action. Besting even scientific high-speed cameras and their 100,000 fps rates, this image capturing device developed by Lund University researchers can record video at an mind-blowing rate of five trillion images per second. In short, 5,000,000,000,000 fps.

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New ‘whiplash’ dinosaur species identified from Wyoming skeletal remains

New ‘whiplash’ dinosaur species identified from Wyoming skeletal remains

Back in 1995, a Swiss team of researchers excavated the skeletal remains of a sauropod dinosaur from a site in Wyoming. The remains date back to the Jurassic period and originate from a type of dinosaur that had a long neck and, most notably, a very long whip-like tail. The tail's design is responsible for the term 'whiplash' dinosaur, as the tail itself likely looked like a long, thin whip. The tail is at odds with the dinosaur's otherwise massive body.

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This functional, fiery MIT rocket was 3D printed with plastic

This functional, fiery MIT rocket was 3D printed with plastic

The words "plastic" and "fire-blasting rocket" don't typically go together, but that didn't stop MIT from pulling off the seemingly impossible. The MIT Rocket Team recently demonstrated the successful use of a rocket motor that was 3D printed from plastic, the first time this has ever been accomplished. The successful test was performed at about noon on April 21, and was the culmination of two weeks of parts' design and printing.

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Alzheimer’s Treatment Restores Memory Function : human trials on roadmap

Alzheimer’s Treatment Restores Memory Function : human trials on roadmap

Human trials are now in the conversation with recently famed "repeated scanning ultrasound" (SUS) Alzheimer's disease treatment research. Alzheimer's research saw a jolt of interest over the past year as scanning ultrasounds were found to be effective at memory restoration. In repeated scanning ultrasound treatments of mice brains, positive results of amyloid-β and memory restoration were enough to publish research in AAAS-certified Science Translational Medicine - a publication of good repute.

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Antarctica’s Blood Falls explained (but it’s still super-creepy)

Antarctica’s Blood Falls explained (but it’s still super-creepy)

Blood Falls in Antarctica received its name for a readily apparent reason: it appears to be a stream of blood flowing from the icy landscape. The liquid is somewhat disconcerting to behold, but of course it isn't blood -- researchers have long known it to be some other substance which, at one time, was thought to perhaps be a red algae. A new study sheds light on the possible cause of Blood Falls, though, and the reason is far more interesting: there may be a body of salt water trapped under the glacier that has been there for more than a million years.

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Samsung’s self-driving cars let loose onto public roads

Samsung’s self-driving cars let loose onto public roads

Samsung's self-driving cars are headed to public roads, though the autonomous vehicles will initially only be tested in South Korea. The company announced it was weighing into the driverless vehicle business back in 2015, though its strategy is more about components than a whole vehicle. Don't expect the "Samsung Galaxy Car", but at the same time don't be surprised if the next vehicle you buy has some Samsung components inside.

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Facebook teen mood tracking sparks privacy outrage

Facebook teen mood tracking sparks privacy outrage

Facebook has been accused of tracking emotionally-vulnerable teenagers and opening up that data to advertisers hoping to cash in on insecure kids. The social network has been pushing its advertising platform in recent years, chasing ad revenue that might once have gone straight into Google's pockets. However, while it has access to a whole host of personal information, Facebook has found itself in hot water for how it apparently uses that data.

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NASA showcases inflatable greenhouse for future Mars astronauts

NASA showcases inflatable greenhouse for future Mars astronauts

NASA has published a series of images showcasing the prototype of an inflatable greenhouse that may one day be used to grow food in Earth-like conditions...while on Mars. The greenhouse and others like it would exist to provide food for human astronauts who eventually make their way to the Red Planet. This prototype joins numerous studies conducted by the space agency that evaluate which foods are ideal for space growth and the best ways to encourage their growth in adverse conditions.

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