Research

Analysis uncovers the Twitter accounts behind Harry and Meghan hate

Analysis uncovers the Twitter accounts behind Harry and Meghan hate

Following their exit from the royal life in early 2020, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex Harry and Meghan experienced a considerable amount of hate on social media, among other places, including substantial abuse targeted specifically at the duchess. Bot Sentinel Inc. analyzed the phenomenon to determine what, exactly, was fueling this negativity and whether it was simply the result of organic activity or something more coordinated.

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A blind woman received a brain implant enabling vision

A blind woman received a brain implant enabling vision

One of the senses of the human body that most of us take for granted is vision. Researchers have been working for years to find methods to improve and enable vision in those with blindness or some type of impairment. New research has been published by scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah and Miguel Hernandez University in Spain. The research outlines an experiment that successfully created a type of artificial vision for a woman that relies on a brain implant.

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Sleep deprivation impacts how you walk finds study

Sleep deprivation impacts how you walk finds study

If you ever tried to go to work or school after sleeping only a few hours the night before and had a hard time walking around, there's a reason for that. A new study from MIT has been published showing that sleep deprivation can impact how you walk. According to the MIT study, making up for lost sleep can remedy fatigue-induced clumsiness, even if it's only a few extra hours of sleep on the weekend.

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Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine gets FDA panel recommendation for young kids

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine gets FDA panel recommendation for young kids

The US is one step closer to the anticipated authorization of a COVID-19 vaccine for young kids ages five to 11 years. An independent panel of advisers has recommended the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorize the use of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine in children who fall in this age group, bringing the US closer than ever to a vaccine option that covers the majority of the population.

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Pathfinder mission to study solar energetic particles is ready

Pathfinder mission to study solar energetic particles is ready

NASA is talking about a new joint project it's going to be conducting with the Naval Research Laboratory that's dedicated to studying the origin of solar energetic particles. The mission is called the UVSC Pathfinder, UVSC is short for Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph Pathfinder. The mission is ready to launch and will head into orbit by tagging along with STPSat-6, which is the primary spacecraft in the Space Test Program-3 DoD mission.

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Researchers develop a concept to make rocket fuel on Mars

Researchers develop a concept to make rocket fuel on Mars

The biggest challenge for a sustained human presence on Mars or the moon is how to bring enough supplies to sustain humans. One of the biggest challenges is bringing enough fuel for the rocket transporting the crew to Mars and having enough left over for the return trip. Many scientists believe the answer to that question is to harvest some of the materials needed for a sustained presence on the Red Planet from the planet itself.

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Johns Hopkins to lead first federally-funded psychedelic study in decades

Johns Hopkins to lead first federally-funded psychedelic study in decades

For the first time in around five decades, the US government has issued a federal grant for the study of psychedelics. The funds have been granted to three universities: New York University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The grant is intended to study the psychedelic compound psilocybin as a potential therapeutic tool for addressing addiction.

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New solid-state battery material is sourced from trees

New solid-state battery material is sourced from trees

One of the most abundant renewable resources we have on the planet is trees. Tree farms worldwide grow all types of trees for use in making construction materials, paper, and a litany of other items. Researchers from Brown University are working to create batteries that could be used for electric vehicles and other more efficient and safer products than today's lithium-ion batteries. The problem with lithium-ion batteries today is that they can overheat and catch fire when damaged.

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Study outlines a new way to control light using black phosphorus

Study outlines a new way to control light using black phosphorus

Caltech professor Harry Atwater and a team of co-authors published a new paper describing a new method of controlling light using an extremely thin material. In the research, the scientists used three layers of phosphorus atoms creating material capable of polarizing light that is tunable, precise, and thin. One of the best examples of a common item we are all familiar with that relies on polarized light to create readable characters is the screen of a calculator.

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Residue found in 2.5 billion-year-old ruby linked to ancient life

Residue found in 2.5 billion-year-old ruby linked to ancient life

We know the earliest life that appeared on the surface of our planet wasn't complex life as we know it today. Rather, ancient life would've been much simpler than humans, plants, and various animals. Scientists have made a very interesting discovery while analyzing some of the oldest colored gemstones in the world.

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New research finds humans didn’t cause woolly mammoth extinction

New research finds humans didn’t cause woolly mammoth extinction

The woolly mammoth is an ancient ancestor of modern elephants covered with fur that roamed the ancient Earth alongside early humans. The massive creatures roamed the Earth for 5 million years before going extinct four thousand years ago. Some have speculated that the reason the woolly mammoth went extinct was from overhunting by ancient humans.

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Researchers create a wooden knife much sharper than steel

Researchers create a wooden knife much sharper than steel

Typically, when we see knives built for use in the kitchen, they're made out of metal or ceramic. Sometimes if you get food to go, you might get a knife that's made out of plastic. A group of researchers from the University of Maryland has created a knife using hardwood. The team says their hardwood knife is about three times sharper than a stainless steel dinner knife.

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