Research

SpaceX NASA launch: How to watch live [UPDATE: Scrubbed]

SpaceX NASA launch: How to watch live [UPDATE: Scrubbed]

Today NASA's Commercial Crew Program will launch NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley on a SpaceX Crew Dragon to the ISS. The International Space Station will receive the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft after the 4:33 EDT launch today on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. To participate and watch live, you'll want to take a few steps.

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Astronomers have discovered a new class of cosmic explosion

Astronomers have discovered a new class of cosmic explosion

Astronomers have found a pair of objects that have been added to a strange object discovered in 2018 that combined to constitute a new class of cosmic explosions. The new type of explosion shares some of the characteristics with supernova explosions of massive stars and with the explosions that generate gamma-ray bursts. Despite the similarities, the new class of explosion has distinctive differences from each of the other classes.

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Dinosaur killing asteroid hit the Earth at the “deadliest possible” angle

Dinosaur killing asteroid hit the Earth at the “deadliest possible” angle

New computer simulations from Imperial College London have looked at the asteroid that killed off the dinosaurs. The simulations reveal that the asteroid that struck the Earth hit at the "deadliest possible" angle. Scientists say that the new computer simulations show that the asteroid hit the Earth at an angle of about 60 degrees, maximizing the amount of climate-changing gases thrown into the upper atmosphere.

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Certain exercises linked to improved blood flow in key brain regions

Certain exercises linked to improved blood flow in key brain regions

It's no secret that aerobic exercise can help protect and even improve brain health, and now a new study can potentially explain why. According to researchers with UT Southwestern Medical Center, aerobic exercise may improve blood flow in two key parts of the brain. This may be particularly beneficial for older adults who are risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

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MIT breakthrough makes tissues stretchable and durable

MIT breakthrough makes tissues stretchable and durable

Researchers at MIT have created a new chemical process called ELAST that is used to make tissue used in a laboratory setting stretchable, compressible, and nearly indestructible. It's been a challenge in biomedical research labs around the world to make imaging cells and molecules in the brain and other large tissues easier while making the samples tough enough to last for years of handling in the lab. The team's new chemical ELAST process is an answer to that challenge.

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An AI beat humans in a selfie personality test

An AI beat humans in a selfie personality test

Another study has found that artificial intelligence is able to beat humans -- this time it involves judging selfies to determine the subject's personality traits. The machine was best able to identify one particular trait, at least compared to humans, but it was ultimately able to determine five different personality qualities based on nothing more than a picture of a face.

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Researchers reach world’s fastest Internet speed with an optical chip

Researchers reach world’s fastest Internet speed with an optical chip

We've seen the Internet groan (metaphorically, of course) under the weight of a sudden increase in users and usage in the past months. The global situation proved how ill-prepared our technologies are to support such a scenario, especially if and when it actually becomes the "new normal". Various companies like SpaceX and Amazon are looking to the stars to augment our Internet capabilities but a cross-university team of Australian researchers was able to reach a whopping 44 Tbps data speed with existing optic fiber networks and a new optical chip.

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Antarctic snow is turning green and climate change is to blame

Antarctic snow is turning green and climate change is to blame

Antarctica's iconic white terrain is turning green, and the problem is only going to get worse, scientists warn, as climate change wreaks havoc on some of the most distant areas of the Earth. Green snow algae is proving a stubborn addition to the Antarctic Peninsula coast, a new study has shown, and rising temperatures suggest greater spread is likely.

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Purdue researchers create a smartphone app to help assess anemia

Purdue researchers create a smartphone app to help assess anemia

One of the methods that doctors use to diagnose the condition known as anemia is by looking at the person's eyelid and judging its redness, which indicates the number of red blood cells. The challenge for doctors is that the simple test isn't precise enough to give a diagnosis without drawing a blood sample from the patient. Researchers at Purdue University have developed software that could enable medical staff to take a picture of the inner eyelid of the patient using a smartphone and receive a near-accurate count of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells.

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Researchers find that bumblebees damage plant leaves to accelerate flower production

Researchers find that bumblebees damage plant leaves to accelerate flower production

The bumblebee is a critical part of the pollination process that helps plants and flowers grow. Scientists at ETH have demonstrated an interesting way that bumblebees damage plant leaves to accelerate flower production when pollen is in short supply. The researchers found that bumblebee workers use their mouths to pierce the leaves of plants that haven't flowered yet and that the resulting damage stimulates the production of new flowers that bloom earlier than those in plants the bees haven't damaged the leaves of.

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Biomimetic eye prototype brings cyborgs closer to reality

Biomimetic eye prototype brings cyborgs closer to reality

New research out of Hong Kong brings humanity one step closer to the existence of cyborgs. The study, which was published in the prestigious journal Nature, details the creation of a biomimetic eye prototype that features a hemispherical retina made from a high-density nanowires array that is the machine equivalent of the photoreceptors found in the human eye. The prototype could pay the way for 'super vision' in robots and maybe, eventually, in humans, as well.

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NASA’s parallel universe, backwards time, and a paywall

NASA’s parallel universe, backwards time, and a paywall

This week a report from ANITA (maintained by NASA) showed results of a study that've subsequently been skewed beyond sense. This is largely due to a single report that was partially blocked behind a paywall. Because a great many news sources used this article on the original report, instead of seeking out the original report, they had to assume that what was visible to the public was the whole story - and it most certainly is not.

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