research

There’s a new giant octopus in town

There’s a new giant octopus in town

You might have thought 2017 was all out of surprises, but here's one more: what we thought was just one giant octopus is actually two distinct species. The Giant Pacific Octopus, or GPO, had already set records as being the largest known example of octopus kind on the planet. Now, scientists have discovered that there's not one type, but two.

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Researchers create patch that can reduce love handles by 30%

Researchers create patch that can reduce love handles by 30%

Researchers from the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have created a novel approach to reducing fat stored around your midsection. The team has come up with a new way to deliver drugs with a micro-needle patch filled with drugs that are able to turn the bad energy-storing white fat in our bodies into energy-burning brown fat.

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Apple was the Christmas 2017 smartphone winner

Apple was the Christmas 2017 smartphone winner

Apple was the Christmas 2017 smartphone and tablet winner, new activations research suggests, comfortably out-pacing Samsung while Google remains in the weeds. Smartphone-makers are generally fairly coy about disclosing sales figures, particularly for individual devices or specific retail periods. However, that doesn't mean the stats can't be fathomed out by roundabout ways.

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Double whirlpool fish-Hyperloop spotted in ocean

Double whirlpool fish-Hyperloop spotted in ocean

Cunning sea life could be using huge, overlapping swirls of ocean water that overlap in unexpected ways to travel great distances with minimal exertion, marine scientists are suggesting. Eddies, the swirls of water motion, are a well known phenomenon in the ocean, and can range in size up to hundreds of miles in diameter. However, something very interesting happens when they coincide.

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This creepy connected speaker hack is the latest IoT security risk

This creepy connected speaker hack is the latest IoT security risk

An odd Sonos and Bose glitch could allow hackers to remotely play audio through their speakers, or even trigger smart home commands. The security loophole - a fairly unusual combination of network settings and connected speaker architecture intended to make configuration easier - is the latest illustration of how fairly innocuous decisions around the Internet of Things can have unforeseen consequences.

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Scientists create the coldest nanoelectric chip ever

Scientists create the coldest nanoelectric chip ever

A team of physicists at the University of Basel have successfully created what they claim to be the coldest temperature a nanoelectric chip has ever been cooled to. The team was successful in cooling the chip to a temperature lower than 3 millikelvins. The scientists are Physicists at the University of Basel working in the department of physics and with help from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and other researchers.

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Amazon’s first-ever hybrid bird confirmed

Amazon’s first-ever hybrid bird confirmed

After extensive research a team have revealed their discovery: the very first hybrid bird species ever found in the Amazon rainforest. This bird is known as the golden-crowned manakin, so called for its crown of yellow feathers. This bird was born of two other birds in the manakin clade - that is, group of creatures with a single common ancestor. This bird is tiny - the meaning of its Middle Dutch root word mannekijn is "little man."

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Oldest fossil ever found dated to 3.5 billion years ago

Oldest fossil ever found dated to 3.5 billion years ago

For humans, 100-years is a long time and it's hard for our minds to comprehend that sort of time. That is a tiny amount of time in the scheme of things for our planet. Humans have been around for what seems to be an eternity dating back 3 million years. Scientists have recently dated what they claim to be the oldest fossils showing that even that 3-million-years is the blink of an eye on a cosmic scale.

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Self-healing glass could make cracked phone screens just a memory

Self-healing glass could make cracked phone screens just a memory

Smartphones are very fragile devices, especially with the shift to glass-metal-glass sandwiches. Fortunately, parts can be replaced or repaired, but at some cost. One of the most expensive components is the screen, which usually comes with glass fused on top of the actual display panel. Glass might not scratch but it does shatter and crack. This glass from the University of Tokyo does as well, but it also does one thing that no other glass can. It can repair those cracks, at room temperature, and with just a small amount of pressure applied.

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Oumuamua may have alien water under a thick carbon crust

Oumuamua may have alien water under a thick carbon crust

In mid-October of this year, researchers discovered what they believe to be an interstellar object that has entered our own sliver of the universe. The object, which has been dubbed 'Oumuamua, is long and slim, relatively speaking, with a shape that some describe as UFO-like. Despite its appearance, though, all signs point toward the object originating from nature, not intelligent life, but its composition remains in question.

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MIT engineers create glowing plants to replace electrical lights

MIT engineers create glowing plants to replace electrical lights

Engineers from MIT have created a new type of plant that glows brightly and could be used to replace electric lights at night. The engineers embedded nanoparticles in the leaves of a watercress plant allowing the plant to give off a dim light for nearly four hours. The team believes that they can improve the technique to make the plant bright enough to illuminate a workspace.

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Stop those annoying phantom traffic jams by not tailgating say researchers

Stop those annoying phantom traffic jams by not tailgating say researchers

We have all been there, sitting in traffic for an hour only to finally get to where traffic is flowing again and realize there is no reason for the jam. A pair of researchers from the MIT Computer Scientists and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has recently shown that we could have fewer of these phantom traffic jams if we just stopped tailgating.

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