research

New medical ‘breathalyzer’ detects diseases via a patient’s breath

New medical ‘breathalyzer’ detects diseases via a patient’s breath

A new type of medical technology can detect 17 different diseases by ‘sniffing’ an afflicted patient’s breath, according to the American Chemical Society. The technology was inspired by the now-dated diagnoses method used by doctors before the advent of modern medical labs — sniffing a patient’s breath for signs of a particular disease. The technology is essentially a disease breathalyzer.

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Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy

Researchers develop nanodiscs to deliver personalized cancer therapy

Researchers from the University of Michigan have reported success in cancer research with mice using a new delivery method for therapies called nanodiscs. The researchers were able to use the nanodiscs to deliver a customized therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of colon and melanoma cancer tumors. Personalized immunotherapy is a growing field of research for cancer treatments.

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Self-assembly process builds nanowires with tiny 3-atom wide copper-sulfur crystalline core

Self-assembly process builds nanowires with tiny 3-atom wide copper-sulfur crystalline core

Stanford University researchers with help for the US Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have created a new self-assembly process that that uses something called diamondoids to create tiny nanowires that have a solid core. That solid core inside the tiny nanowires is made from a 3-atom wide copper-sulfur crystalline material and is the smallest core possible. The tiny nanowires have superior electrical properties due to the lack of defects in the solid crystalline core.

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Apple’s first ever AI paper is on how to train your AI

Apple’s first ever AI paper is on how to train your AI

Apple isn't exactly a company you'd immediately associate with artificial intelligence research, but of course it does some. After all, it has Siri and some intelligent object recognition in its camera apps. The reason why you don't hear much about it is that Apple has mostly been secretive about its AI R&D, which has been criticized by the AI community for years. That changed when, earlier this month, Apple promised to start publicly publishing its AI research, the first of which has just finally been revealed.

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Cheetahs are closer to extinction than anyone knew

Cheetahs are closer to extinction than anyone knew

A mere 7,100 cheetahs remain the wild, a new study has confirmed, putting the wild cats perilously close to extinction and spurring demands that they be officially classed as "endangered". The striking big cats, which hold the record as the world's fastest land animal, are currently considered "vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. That, the authors of a new study insist, paints the actual situation in too rosy a way.

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Kissenger Robotic kisser lets you make out from afar

Kissenger Robotic kisser lets you make out from afar

There are people all around the world who are far away from loved ones or in long distance relationships with someone they love. A new device called Kissenger has been developed that aims to allow you to share kisses with your loved ones from afar. This device allows you to send kisses by smashing your lips against a rubber pad that is attached to your smartphone.

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Researchers lambast study associating HPV vaccine with brain damage

Researchers lambast study associating HPV vaccine with brain damage

Vaccines are a hot topic and, unfortunately, the source of ample criticism by those who fear they cause autism and other conditions. The latest vaccine to reach alarm status is the HPV vaccine, which deals with the human papilloma virus and aims to prevent cervical cancer in women. This vaccine is recommended for women and girls, and is also increasingly being given to boys, but a new study has undermined confidence in it, associating it with brain damage in mice.

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Hospitals eliminate bedsores using NASA Mars technology

Hospitals eliminate bedsores using NASA Mars technology

The same technology used for NASA's Mars lander has been used to eliminate the occurrence of bedsores in more than half a dozen hospitals, while other hospitals were able to reduce the instances of bedsores as much as 90-percent. The technology works by detecting damage in the process of developing in a patient’s skin before it becomes a visible ulcer, allowing medical facilities to address and treat it before it grows into a larger problem.

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Edipeel invisible food coating keeps fruit fresh for weeks

Edipeel invisible food coating keeps fruit fresh for weeks

Fresh food is great assuming you live near a suitable market, have a way to properly store the food, and you can consume it all before it goes bad. Things like lettuce, green onions, strawberries, and other fruits and vegetables are prone to going bad relatively quickly after being purchased, though, making it unappealing to many consumers, not to mention the waste that results. One company, fortunately, may have a solution.

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This odd dinosaur changed drastically as it aged

This odd dinosaur changed drastically as it aged

In the Gobi desert a new sort of dinosaur has been discovered which changed drastically from birth to age six. Using a total of 19 sets of bones, paleontologists show how Limusaurus inextricabilis ("mire lizard who could not escape") changed in big ways in the first year of its life. Researchers have shown how baby versions of this dinosaur had teeth, but that these teeth left the dinosaur within a year. But what about reptiles in our modern age that lose and grow several sets of teeth? This research has an answer for that, and other oddities, too.

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Study shows how many bugs are migrating over England (it’s a LOT)

Study shows how many bugs are migrating over England (it’s a LOT)

If you have ever taken a random insect to the face and wondered just how many of the little buggers are in the sky a new study sought to answer that question. The study was published in the journal "Science" and found that there are over three trillion migrating insects flying over south-central England each year. One of the scientists on the study figures that number would expand significantly if you conducted similar research elsewhere.

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Ebola outbreak fears in Africa squashed as new vaccine proves effective

Ebola outbreak fears in Africa squashed as new vaccine proves effective

The last major Ebola outbreak that struck in West Africa several years back may be the last such outbreak in history as a new vaccine has proven effective in preventing infection. During that last outbreak there was no vaccine and over 11,000 people died from the vicious disease among the almost 30,000 people that were infected with Ebola.

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