research

Researchers teleport an object from Earth to space for the first time

Researchers teleport an object from Earth to space for the first time

It may have only been a single photon, but it represents a huge milestone for researchers. For the first time ever, scientists have successfully teleported an object (the photon) from Earth to space, something facilitated by a sort of quantum network. This was made possible in part by the Micius satellite, which was launched into orbit from the Gobi Desert last year.

Continue Reading

Battery-free cell phone prototype sounds too good to be true

Battery-free cell phone prototype sounds too good to be true

For most of us, a battery-free phone would be an unfathomable dream come true. Imagine being able to use your iPhone 7 or Galaxy S8 all day, everyday without worrying about charging it. Well, researchers from the University of Washington have made the first step, albeit a very tiny one, towards making that a reality. They've managed to create a prototype cell phone that operates without the use of a battery.

Continue Reading

Science says your hands betray your struggle with temptation

Science says your hands betray your struggle with temptation

Researchers have found that a person's hands betray their inner struggle when making decisions, such as when facing temptation and having to choose to resist it. Hand movements during these decision-making processes can indicate whether the person is likely to give in to temptation in the future, all the while revealing to others the kind of struggle that is taking place in their mind. The research helps shed light on the topic of human willpower.

Continue Reading

Antarctica ice shelf is about to break free: here’s what the iceberg will look like

Antarctica ice shelf is about to break free: here’s what the iceberg will look like

Researchers and the public alike have been watching Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf since its massive cracking episode back in January. In the months since the start of the year, we've seen instances where the ice shelf has experienced extensive growth of the fissure that threatens to break it off entirely. According to the latest report from the European Space Agency, the ice shelf is now being held in place by only 3 miles of ice, meaning it could break away at any moment.

Continue Reading

NASA is expanding a faux Mars colony in North Dakota

NASA is expanding a faux Mars colony in North Dakota

North Dakota is the chosen destination for one particular 'Mars colony' that just recently received an expansion. The region, known for its very cold and inhospitable winters, is fitted with several special pods surrounded in an inflatable and soft material. This test site is made possible thanks to both NASA funding and the University of North Dakota's rugby field where the pods are located. The site is currently being used to conduct research.

Continue Reading

Ancient giant crocodile had long, serrated dino teeth

Ancient giant crocodile had long, serrated dino teeth

A gigantic creature called Razanandrongobe sakalavae is the subject of a new research paper, and in it we learn that this beast, which prowled the land 170 million years ago, resembled a crocodile while harboring teeth not unlike the kind possessed by a T-rex. The animal, which is called 'Razana' as a sort of nickname, is the giant ancestor of simple lizards and, during its time, it feasted on dinosaurs.

Continue Reading

Study: you can tell if someone is rich or poor by looking at their face

Study: you can tell if someone is rich or poor by looking at their face

First impressions can tell you a lot about a person, and a new study says those first impressions include whether you're richer or poorer than average. The findings were made by researchers with the University of Toronto's Faculty of Arts and Science; they explain that the determination can be made simply by looking at someone's neutral face without any particular facial expression -- in fact, making an expression like smiling eliminates the ability to make this determination.

Continue Reading

Study: ‘extreme’ Internet use among teens may be harmful to mental health

Study: ‘extreme’ Internet use among teens may be harmful to mental health

A new study coming out the UK has found an association between 'extreme' Internet and, specifically, social media usage among teens and instances of mental health problems. Though the study doesn't conclude that excessive Internet usage may be the cause of the observed mental issues and decreased life satisfaction, the fact stands that spending many hours online is often associated with some type of life dissatisfaction.

Continue Reading

GSK and Exscientia team to develop new drugs using supercomputers

GSK and Exscientia team to develop new drugs using supercomputers

Two companies have teamed up to utilize machine learning for drug development. Exscientia has announced a new collaboration with GSK that will involve using supercomputers to develop new molecules that may one day be used to treat up to ten difference diseases. Exscientia's own artificial intelligence-enabled platform will do the hard work, utilizing GSK 'expertise' in the hunt for 'novel and selective small molecules' designed to address up to ten targets related to diseases of GSK's choice.

Continue Reading

Aztec skull tower reveals big new mystery about ancient culture

Aztec skull tower reveals big new mystery about ancient culture

In 2015, researchers unearthed a huge 'tower' made by the ancient Aztecs out of human skulls. The skulls would, per everything we know about the Aztecs, be ones that had belonged to warrior men from opposing groups who died young as sacrificial victims. Over the past couple years, though, archaeologists have discovered something they didn't expect to find in the tower: skulls belonging to women and children, ushering a big new mystery about what, exactly, the skull tower was for.

Continue Reading

This sensor for wearables, smart homes uses almost no power

This sensor for wearables, smart homes uses almost no power

If the holy grail for smartphones, at least based on recent trends, is bezel-less and foldable screens, the holy grail for wearables is being "unawearable". That's what engineers from UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering call their new tech that reduced a temperature to a size just a little larger than the tip of a No. 2 pencil. And size isn't the only bragging right of this chip. It also uses near zero power, which could make it last ages before running out of juice.

Continue Reading

Gut bacteria pathway may be key to treating obesity: study

Gut bacteria pathway may be key to treating obesity: study

Yet another study has found a link between obesity and gut bacteria, shedding light on a possible treatment option that excludes surgery. The findings were made by researchers with the Cleveland Clinic, which reports that a specific chemical called trimethylamine oxide -- TMAO for short -- is the potential key to this treatment. The chemical results from gut bacteria; mice without it demonstrated obesity protection even when consuming high-calorie diets.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next