research

Sorry, bacteria is faster than the five-second food rule

Sorry, bacteria is faster than the five-second food rule

If you've always followed the so-called 'five second rule' for dropped food, you may want to rethink your dietary habits. According to newly published research from Rutgers University, it doesn't really matter how fast you pick up food because it'll already have germs on it by the time you retrieve it.

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Dolphins recorded having a conversation claim researchers from Russia

Dolphins recorded having a conversation claim researchers from Russia

Researchers from Karadag Nature Reserve Feodosia, Russia claim to have recorded a conversation between a pair of Black Sea bottlenose dolphins called Yasha and Yana. The two dolphins were talking to each other in the pool where they live and the scientists calm that an underwater microphone was able to distinguish the animals' different voices.

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MIT researchers develop camera that can read books without opening them

MIT researchers develop camera that can read books without opening them

You've almost surely heard the phrase "don't judge a book by its cover," but what if you could read a book through its cover? Because that's basically what researchers from MIT and Georgia Tech are able to do with a new imaging system that can read individual pages without opening the cover. In a new study published on Friday, the researchers detail their system that can read the text on a stack of up to nine pages without the need to flip through them.

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Google DeepMind AI achieves near-human level speech capabilities

Google DeepMind AI achieves near-human level speech capabilities

DeepMind, the Google artificial intelligence division behind the champion-defeating AlphaGo bot, has revealed that it's managed to create some of the most realistic, human level speech ever achieved from a machine. Called WaveNet, the new AI is said to act as a deep neural network that's capable of generating speech by sampling real human speech and forming raw audio waveforms.

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Researchers can now identify someone using hair proteins

Researchers can now identify someone using hair proteins

Researchers can now identify someone based on the proteins in their hair, something that may last longer than the DNA prone to degradation. According to the current research — which will be refined in the future — it only takes 185 hair protein markers to identify one person amongst a larger population of a million people. While that may have somewhat limited usage, this method could one day be used to identify a single person in the entire world using one or more strands of hair.

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NASA Osiris-Rex mission launches towards asteroid Bennu

NASA Osiris-Rex mission launches towards asteroid Bennu

Yesterday the NASA Osiris-Rex mission launched without a hitch. This mission is heading to an asteroid called Bennu with plans to take a sample of the asteroid and return it to Earth for study. Osiris-REx is an acronym, which is no surprise when you consider how famous NASA is for acronym names. The name stands for Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer.

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Giant pandas’ status downgraded from ‘endangered’ to ‘vulnerable’

Giant pandas’ status downgraded from ‘endangered’ to ‘vulnerable’

Good news for fans of animals: one of nature's cutest critters, the giant panda, is officially no longer recognized as an endangered species. This announcement comes from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which clarifies, however, that the animals are still considered "vulnerable" to extinction due to the threat of climate change. In other words, the current state of giant pandas is improving, but they're not out of the fire yet.

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Nazi U-boat seen for first time since sinking in 1942

Nazi U-boat seen for first time since sinking in 1942

The German ‘U-boat’ submarine U-576 has been seen for the first time since sinking about 74 years ago. Entombed within are the 45 German sailors who went down with the sub; according to the researchers who discovered it, the hatches are still closed, and most of the other elements — minus the now-rotted wooden deck pieces — are still present. The discovery marks the end of a mission that has been ongoing since 2009, providing an actual look at the vessel that was first 'seen' by sonar in 2014.

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Rosetta finds Philae crammed into a crack on comet surface

Rosetta finds Philae crammed into a crack on comet surface

More than a little drama has happened with the Rosetta mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. Rosetta is the orbiter that circled the comet taking images and recording data while the Philae was a lander that was going to head down to the surface of the comet and send back even more data. The problem was that things didn’t go as planned for Philae.

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LA’s mountain lions could go extinct in the near future

LA’s mountain lions could go extinct in the near future

Mountain lions call the Santa Monica Mountains home, but that could change in the next handful of decades or sooner. According to the National Park Service and a study it did with researchers from UCLA, Utah State University, and UC Davis, LA’s mountain lions may fall victim to their lack of genetic diversity, something stemming from their geographical isolation. The mountain lions' unique location (near such a massive city) has also spurred the development of atypical behaviors.

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Study finds dogs recognize human words regardless of intonation

Study finds dogs recognize human words regardless of intonation

We have all seen the folks who talk to their dogs like they are humans, not that anything is wrong with that. Each time I see someone talking to their dog, I always wonder if the dog actually understands what they are saying. A new study published in the September 2 issue of Science shows that dogs do in fact understand some human words and understand those words regardless of intonation used. The data from the study could provide important insight into how neural networks understand speech.

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NASA says successful DNA sequencing on ISS is major milestone

NASA says successful DNA sequencing on ISS is major milestone

NASA has detailed what it calls a scientific ’game changer’ — the first instance of DNA being successfully sequenced in a microgravity environment. The work was done under the Biomolecule Sequencer experiment on the International Space Station over this past weekend, and was performed by NASA astronaut Kate Rubins. This opens the door for future sequencing of microbes and more on the ISS, and is part of NASA's health-related work as it applies to space and the agency's goal of sending humans to Mars.

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