Research

Scientists develop a new cathode coating to extend lithium-ion battery life

Scientists develop a new cathode coating to extend lithium-ion battery life

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energies Argonne National Laboratory have been working with Hong Kong University of Science and Technology to develop a new particle-level cathode coating for lithium-ion batteries meant to increase their life and safety. The new coating the team created is called PEDOT.

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Scientists find one of the biggest cosmic structures ever dubbed the South Pole Wall

Scientists find one of the biggest cosmic structures ever dubbed the South Pole Wall

Researchers studying 3D maps of the universe and have discovered one of the biggest cosmic structures ever. The structure is a vast wall that stretches 1.4 billion light-years across and contains hundreds of thousands of galaxies. It has been dubbed the South Pole Wall and has been hiding in plain sight.

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Cats were seducing humans for care more than 1,000 years ago

Cats were seducing humans for care more than 1,000 years ago

A popular saying claims that cats choose their people, not the other way around. This feline seduction has been traced back more than 1,000 years thanks to a newly detailed ancient cat skeleton, a new study reports. The skeleton reveals that humans traveling the Silk Road trade routes likely cared for cats along the way, treating them as pets similar to the way humans treat them today.

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OnePlus got into Verizon stores, but it still has a problem

OnePlus got into Verizon stores, but it still has a problem

OnePlus scoring Verizon as an official carrier partner was a big deal back in April, but sales aren't living up to expectations according to a new report. The news that Verizon would offer the OnePlus 8 in-store was seen as evidence that the fan-favorite had hit critical traction for US sales success, but instead we may have had another reminder that the American cellphone market is a tough nut to crack.

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Desk jobs have surprising brain health benefits, but there’s a catch

Desk jobs have surprising brain health benefits, but there’s a catch

Desk and other sedentary jobs are often associated with poorer health, but that's not an entirely accurate picture, according to a new study. Researchers have found that people who work desk-based jobs are less likely to experience cognitive decline as they age compared to others who work physically active jobs. This is good news, but there is a 'catch' when it comes to overall health.

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Animal protein beats plant alternatives for sustaining muscle, study finds

Animal protein beats plant alternatives for sustaining muscle, study finds

When it comes to sustaining the muscles you built up during your younger years, a new study has found that animal-sourced proteins are more effective than protein from soy and wheat, the two most popular plant alternatives. The findings were recently published at The Physiological Society's Future Physiology 2020 conference. The goal of the study was to evaluate the gram-for-gram muscle-sustaining potential of plant proteins compared to animal products.

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Genetically modified corn features antioxidants to cool gut inflammation

Genetically modified corn features antioxidants to cool gut inflammation

A special type of edible corn has been designed to feature high levels of antioxidants that cool down gut bacteria, helping reduce the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) like Crohn's disease. The positive effects were observed in lab mice fed the corn rich in flavonoids, which are plant metabolites with various health-promoting effects.

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Startling white dwarf study joins dots on life’s building block

Startling white dwarf study joins dots on life’s building block

A new theory could explain one of the biggest mysteries about how the Milky Way and other galaxies were created, exploring the role white dwarf stars play in creating the building blocks of the universe. Carbon is an instrumental part of not only galactic formation but life, yet its origins in the Milky Way are still unclear.

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Human cell “membrane on a chip” may help fight coronavirus

Human cell “membrane on a chip” may help fight coronavirus

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have developed a new cell "membrane on-chip" that they say allows the continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with human cells. The scientists believe that the new human cell membrane on a chip will soon be used to test potential drug candidates to fight COVID-19. Scientists behind the project say that testing of this sort is typically done by the pharmaceutical industry using live cells, but their device offers an easier alternative.

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Horror movie fans can better handle pandemic stress, study finds

Horror movie fans can better handle pandemic stress, study finds

The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly increased stress levels among the general public -- the concerns range from unemployment to more extreme things like fears about the breakdown of society or widespread death. New research has found that some people are better able to handle this stress than others, and they're also more likely to love horror movies.

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Microdosing THC confirmed effective for pain relief at minuscule doses

Microdosing THC confirmed effective for pain relief at minuscule doses

The practice of taking very small, sub-perceptual doses of a compound -- microdosing -- is almost exclusively associated with psychedelics. Some medical marijuana users, however, have claimed that microdosing THC has its own benefits, something a new study substantiates. The research comes from Israeli medical technology company Syqe Medical, which reports that microdosing THC may have a profound impact on chronic pain.

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High cholesterol diet study finds carbs, not saturated fat, are key

High cholesterol diet study finds carbs, not saturated fat, are key

If you have high cholesterol levels, you've likely been advised to reduce the amount of saturated fat that you eat. Such recommendations are common but controversial, with some past research having implicated sugars, not fats, as the primary reason some people have too much LDL 'bad' cholesterol. A new study builds upon those, implicating carbohydrates as the primary issue.

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