Research

Why big teams like Apple develop and little ones like OnePlus disrupt

Why big teams like Apple develop and little ones like OnePlus disrupt

A study published this week on the size of teams in science and technology showed how one disrupts while the other tends to develop. I'm using Apple and OnePlus to extrapolate because Apple was, for a while, a disruptor. Now they're not exactly the same company they were a decade ago - they still disrupt the industry, sometimes, but they're far more apt to develop what's already successful. OnePlus, on the other hand, is in a place where they've disrupted the market, recently, and several times over.

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Study finds dementia takes away the ability to daydream

Study finds dementia takes away the ability to daydream

A heartbreaking study out of the University of Sydney has found that people suffering from a type of early-onset dementia lose their ability to daydream and engage in inner monologues. Without the ability to let their mind wander, frontotemporal dementia patients are stuck always living in the moment, unable to anticipate the future or think about their past.

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It’s official: Climate change killed a mammal

It’s official: Climate change killed a mammal

Australian government officials made it official this week: this little creature is extinct. A statement was released by federal Environment Minister Melissa Price, changing the government's status for Bramble Cay melomys (Melomys rubicola) from endangered to extinct. This is the first time in history a mammal was made extinct due directly to human-made climate change. It's a little mouse and it's dead now because of us.

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Japan set to fire projectile at Ryugu asteroid to kick up samples for collection

Japan set to fire projectile at Ryugu asteroid to kick up samples for collection

Japan's space agency, JAXA, has been conducting a mission to the asteroid called Ryugu since the Hayabusa 2 probe launched in 2014. The mission will soon lower the Hayabusa 2 probe to the surface of the asteroid in an attempt to collect samples. Before that probe heads towards the surface of the asteroid, the mission planners will rehearse the mission aiming to fire metal bullets into the surface of Ryugu.

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Lobster underbellies are surprisingly tough and study could lead to flexible body armor

Lobster underbellies are surprisingly tough and study could lead to flexible body armor

Researchers from MIT have been studying creatures from nature for ways to mimic nature to improve all manner of products that humans use every day. One creature that has been studied is the lobster, specifically its underside. The underside of a lobster tail is split into segments that are connected by a flexible translucent membrane.

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This is why you shouldn’t microwave grapes

This is why you shouldn’t microwave grapes

Microwaves are pretty convenient in heating or cooking food, erasing notebooks, and some other odd uses but there are things you shouldn't put inside the device. Metal immediately comes to mind but, oddly enough, grapes are taboo as well. For years, there have been discussions on the hidden perils of putting the fruit in the microwave but now physicists may have finally come up with an answer to that mystery and, like any good scientific puzzle, could even be used for future technologies.

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Super Snow Moon 2019: When to see February’s supermoon

Super Snow Moon 2019: When to see February’s supermoon

Another supermoon will arrive this week following the celestial event late last month. Starting tonight, sky-gazers will get a change to see the brightest moon of 2019, one called the "super snow moon." This supermoon will be at its closest point to Earth tomorrow, February 19, though it will appear notably brighter and larger than usual on the days before and after, as well.

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This stressed asteroid could put a new spin on NASA’s comet blasting plan

This stressed asteroid could put a new spin on NASA’s comet blasting plan

Groundbreaking analysis of a distant, fast-moving comet has revealed new details in how asteroids form, shedding light on the formation of unusual shapes and, potentially, paving the way for more effective protection of the Earth from meteor impacts. The asteroid, Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, is around 2.7 miles across and moving at as much as 84,000 miles per hour, but scientists have long been fascinated by its unusual shape.

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China plans to deploy a solar power station in space

China plans to deploy a solar power station in space

China has announced that it plans to build a solar power station that will orbit the Earth and send power back to Earth for use. China has become with this announcement the first country to plan a solar power station in space. The station would orbit the Earth at 36,000 km.

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Fossilized spider still has the glowing eyes of a night hunter

Fossilized spider still has the glowing eyes of a night hunter

Typically when scientists find a fossil, the fossil is the remains of creatures that have bones. Finding fossils of soft-bodied creatures such as spiders is unusual. The typical discovery of a spider comes in amber.

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NASA to 3D print sensors, wireless circuit on a single silicon

NASA to 3D print sensors, wireless circuit on a single silicon

3D printing has been a real game changer in the modern world. It has made it possible to fabricate all kinds of objects without being subject to the mercy of large production lines. One can even 3D print food to some extent. Now researchers funded by NASA will apply that technology and manufacturing approach to print sensors and even a partial circuitry for wireless communication on a single board that's no larger than your phone.

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Scientists identify honey bee gene that could lead to disease-resistant colonies

Scientists identify honey bee gene that could lead to disease-resistant colonies

It's well-known that bees play an important role around the globe, with their pollination process responsible for the survival of plants that humans rely on. With recent years seeing different bee populations in various regions threatened, it's becoming essential to understand and ensure their health. A recent study has found a specific group of genes in honeybees that could be used to improve their survivability.

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