research

China launches first cargo spacecraft, successfully docks with orbiting station

China launches first cargo spacecraft, successfully docks with orbiting station

A Chinese cargo spacecraft successfully docked with the country's Tiangong-2 space lab on Saturday, marking a significant achievement for the nation's space agency. The Tianzhou-1 cargo ship was launched on April 20th from the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center in Southern China, and is the first such supply delivery mission to the space station. Once the spacecraft arrived, it connected to the station via automated docking process.

Continue Reading

MIT makes apps that teaches language for just a few seconds

MIT makes apps that teaches language for just a few seconds

We have become an "instant" culture, that is, a culture of instant gratification. We expect what we want, from an Internet connection to a reply to a message to that viral cat video, to be there at a push of a button. And it bugs us to no end when they don't. But instead of losing our cool, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory or CSAIL suggest a better use of those precious moments. Meet WaitSuite, a group of micro-learning apps that can teach you language, math, or even medicine while waiting for an elevator or waiting for your device to connect to a Wi-Fi hotspot.

Continue Reading

Study: LSD causes a higher state of consciousness (sort of)

Study: LSD causes a higher state of consciousness (sort of)

Psychedelics -- those who have tried them have a hard time describing what they're like, and those who haven't tried them have no idea what they're missing. Or something like that. Proponents have long described a type of higher consciousness that accompanies drugs like LSD and magic mushrooms, and now a new study have found evidence that this is true. Volunteers who took psychedelics were discovered to experience a higher state of consciousness...but not in the way you're probably thinking.

Continue Reading

Facebook wants you to type with your brain

Facebook wants you to type with your brain

When Facebook poached Regina Dugan from Google, we knew the former DARPA chief would deliver something interesting: "Project: Type with your brain" is the first example of that. Announced at F8 2017 this morning, it's a project to develop a silent speech interface, with the speed and flexibility of voice control, but the privacy of typing text. In effect, it's about reading your mind and typing directly what you're thinking onto the screen in front of you.

Continue Reading

The physical Brexit study: how close to Pangea?

The physical Brexit study: how close to Pangea?

A study has been conducted which shows when England began to break away from Europe physically, creating the Dover Strait. Using bathymetric maps to study the bottom of the sea, scientists have discovered a lot more than what's previously been known about the area and the sequence of events that created today's topography. Britain, it turns out, was connected to the mainland (last time it was connected, that is) via a chalk ridge that kept a giant proglacial lake in check - until disaster struck.

Continue Reading

This common antibiotic may help prevent PTSD

This common antibiotic may help prevent PTSD

Humans are wired to have a fear response to certain things, but in some cases that fear response can go haywire, and the result is an individual afflicted with PTSD. Many researchers have spent many years searching for a suitable treatment that is both effective and easily acquired. According to a new study, the solution may be a common antibiotic called doxycycline, which has been shown to diminish fear response in volunteers.

Continue Reading

Electrical implant allows paralyzed man to move his legs

Electrical implant allows paralyzed man to move his legs

There isn't usually much doctors can do after a spinal cord injury that results in paralysis, but a new breakthrough from Mayo Clinic may give reason to hope. The clinic reports that an electrical implant placed near the site of a spinal cord injury allowed a paralyzed patient to make voluntary movements with his legs, which is a pretty big breakthrough.

Continue Reading

Potato plant successfully grown in simulated Mars environment

Potato plant successfully grown in simulated Mars environment

NASA wants to send people to Mars, but it has some issues to overcome first. One of those issues is how it will feed its astronauts. Researchers have been studying the growth of plants in microgravity environments, among other things, and now a new team has announced the successful growth of a potato plant in Mars-like conditions. It is possible this breakthrough could also aid in growing potatoes in arid regions of Earth.

Continue Reading

Tiny fish foils predators by injecting them with opioid venom

Tiny fish foils predators by injecting them with opioid venom

The tiny fish Meiacanthus nigrolineatus, also known as the fanged blenny fish, doesn't look like much, but it has a secret weapon to keep predators at bay: venom. This venom is used to stop predators in their tracks, causing their blood pressure to drop and their ability to eat the blenny to diminish. While most fang-based venom causes extreme pain in the victim, the blenny fish's venom is different because it contains, among other things, an opioid peptide.

Continue Reading

Milestone brown dwarf star is 250 times purer than the Sun

Milestone brown dwarf star is 250 times purer than the Sun

Researchers have announced the discovery of SDSS J0104+1535, a new milestone brown dwarf star said to have the purest composition of any known similar dwarf, as well as the highest discovered mass. The star is found in the far reaches of our galaxy in a constellation called Pisces, and it is one of many ancient stars that compose that region. The star is thought to be around 10 billion years old.

Continue Reading

Facial recognition successfully used to diagnose rare genetic diseases

Facial recognition successfully used to diagnose rare genetic diseases

Researchers have successfully used facial recognition technology to detect a rare genetic disease called DiGeorge syndrome in patients. This breakthrough could prove to be a new diagnostic tool for doctors who often have trouble diagnosing the disease due to its many symptoms. The condition is estimated to affect one in 3000 to 6000 kids, and causes defects like heart problems and cleft palate.

Continue Reading

Researchers make nanofiber air filter that can be painted onto fabric

Researchers make nanofiber air filter that can be painted onto fabric

Researchers with the National University of Singapore have created a new type of air filter using nanofibers that is about two times more effective than commercial air respirators. This nanofiber air filter is see-through with better airflow than traditionally available air filters, and it also provides some level of UV protection. The air filter is described as eco-friendly and economical.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next